pharisee


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Related to pharisee: Sadducee

phar·i·see

 (făr′ĭ-sē)
n.
1. Pharisee A member of an ancient Jewish sect that emphasized strict interpretation and observance of the Mosaic law in both its oral and written form.
2. A hypocritically self-righteous person.

[Middle English pharise, from Old English fariseus and from Old French pharise, both from Late Latin pharīsaeus, from Greek pharīsaios, from Aramaic pərišayyā, pl. of pəriš, separate, from pəraš, to separate; see prš in Semitic roots.]

Pharisee

(ˈfærɪˌsiː)
n
1. (Judaism) Judaism a member of an ancient Jewish sect that was opposed to the Sadducees, teaching strict observance of Jewish tradition as interpreted rabbinically and believing in life after death and in the coming of the Messiah
2. (often not capital) a self-righteous or hypocritical person
[Old English Farīsēus, ultimately from Aramaic perīshāiyā, pl of perīsh separated]

Phar•i•see

(ˈfær əˌsi)

n.
1. a member of an ancient Jewish sect that differed from the Sadducees chiefly in its strict observance of religious practices, liberal interpretation of the Bible, and adherence to oral laws and traditions.
2. (l.c.) a sanctimonious, self-righteous, or hypocritical person.
[before 900; Middle English Pharise, Farise, Old English Farīsēus < Late Latin Pharīsaeus < Greek Pharīsaîos < Aramaic pərīshayyā, pl. of pərīshā literally, separated]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pharisee - a self-righteous or sanctimonious personpharisee - a self-righteous or sanctimonious person
disagreeable person, unpleasant person - a person who is not pleasant or agreeable
2.Pharisee - a member of an ancient Jewish sect noted for strict obedience to Jewish traditions
Jew, Hebrew, Israelite - a person belonging to the worldwide group claiming descent from Jacob (or converted to it) and connected by cultural or religious ties

pharisee

noun
A person who practices hypocrisy:
Translations

Pharisee

[ˈfærɪsiː] Nfariseo m

Pharisee

n (fig: also pharisee) → Pharisäer(in) m(f)
References in classic literature ?
He was, and is yet most likely, the wearisomest self-righteous Pharisee that ever ransacked a Bible to rake the promises to himself and fling the curses to his neighbours.
LET us hurry to the walls," said Abel-Phittim to Buzi-Ben-Levi and Simeon the Pharisee, on the tenth day of the month Thammuz, in the year of the world three thousand nine hundred and fortyone--let us hasten to the ramparts adjoining the gate of Benjamin, which is in the city of David, and overlooking the camp of the uncircumcised; for it is the last hour of the fourth watch, being sunrise; and the idolaters, in fulfilment of the promise of Pompey, should be awaiting us with the lambs for the sacrifices.
I know a great many sorts of very engaging tricks, which I will teach your goat; for example, to mimic the Bishop of Paris, that cursed Pharisee whose mill wheels splash passers-by the whole length of the Pont aux Meuniers.
Bulstrode's close attention was not agreeable to the publicans and sinners in Middlemarch; it was attributed by some to his being a Pharisee, and by others to his being Evangelical.
He, too, had taken the part of the lowly and oppressed, and against all the established power of priest and pharisee.
Who but a Pharisee can believe that he is better than another?
Between the Mussulman and the Pharisee, commend me to the first
Who denounced in unmeasured terms the exploiters of his own time: 'Woe unto you, scribes and pharisees, hypocrites
The Christianity of America is a Christianity, of whose votaries it may be as truly said, as it was of the ancient scribes and Pharisees, "They bind heavy burdens, and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders, but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers.
They say that the long-nosed, lanky, dyspeptic-looking body-snatchers, with the indescribable hats on, and a long curl dangling down in front of each ear, are the old, familiar, self-righteous Pharisees we read of in the Scriptures.
It was a triumph of irony for that outcast poet to die amid the trappings of vulgar respectability; it reminded Leonard Upjohn of Christ among the Pharisees, and the analogy gave him opportunity for an exquisite passage.
Wizout you, sir, Great Pritain, ze land you lofed so well and zat has requited you so ill, zat land of Pharisees and reptiles, can do nozzing