phenology


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phe·nol·o·gy

 (fĭ-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The scientific study of periodic biological phenomena, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions.
2. The timing of a periodic biological phenomenon in relation to climatic conditions.


phe′no·log′i·cal (fē′nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
phe·nol′o·gist n.

phenology

(fɪˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
the study of recurring phenomena, such as animal migration, esp as influenced by climatic conditions
[C19: from pheno(menon) + -logy]
phenological adj
pheˈnologist n

phe•nol•o•gy

(fɪˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the science dealing with the influence of climate on the recurrence of such annual phenomena of animal and plant life as budding and bird migrations.
[1880–85; syncopated variant of phenomenology, with restriction to climatic phenomena]
phe•no•log•i•cal (ˌfin lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
phe`no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
phe•nol′o•gist, n.

phe·nol·o·gy

(fĭ-nŏl′ə-jē)
The scientific study of cyclical biological events, such as flowering, breeding, and migration, in relation to climatic conditions.

phenology

the branch of biology that studies the relation between variations in climate and periodic biological phenomena, as the migration of birds or the flowering of plants. — phenologist, n. — phenologic, phenological, adj.
See also: Climate
the study of natural phenomena that occur periodically, as migration or blossoming, and their relation to climate and changes of season. — phenologist, n.phenological, adj.
See also: Time
the study of the effects of climate on animal and plant life. — phenologist, phaenologist, n. — phenologic, phaenologic, phenological, phaenological, adj.
See also: Organisms
References in periodicals archive ?
He recommends tracking the phenology (or growth stages) of vines, and describes how to use them to time chores for better results.
We also examined the degree of overlap in habitat preference and flowering phenology by measuring environmental factors such as soil moisture, soil temperature, slope, and aspect along with monitoring the flowering phenology of these species.
Knowledge of peach phenology and agroclimatic variables will confer the potential for local adaptation of peach crops.
These awards will support research to help better detect, understand and predict the effects of phenology, climate and land-use changes on living systems, and also predict the feedbacks to the environment that cross local and continental scales.
Background: Phenology is the study of growth of buds; leaf flushing, anthesis, fruiting and leaf fall in relation to seasons or years with climatic factors.
The SimulArroz model contains a "biological clock" that controls growth and development by calculating the production of leaves and the phenology of the crop (Streck et al.
Educators and managers at the park already have taken note, and have engaged visitors in observing the phenology of key species, including the Gambel oak and Fremont cottonwood, since 2013.
Global climate change may further increase challenges for migratory songbirds by influencing plant phenology and hence timing of food resource availability, especially of arthropod larvae (Bairlein and Hiippop, 2004; Strode, 2003; Both et al.
Without accurate monitoring techniques and current information on distribution, phenology, and abundance, effective management can be challenging.
I can only say how things are shaping up so far, but so far, it's shockingly early," Theresa Crimmins, the assistant director of the National Phenology Network, told Climate Change about spring's early arrival.
Phenology is the study of the timing of natural events such as the appearance of the first apple blossoms.