phenomenology

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phe·nom·e·nol·o·gy

(fĭ-nŏm′ə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. A philosophy or method of inquiry concerned with the perception and experience of objects and events as the basis for the investigation of reality.
2. A philosophical movement based on this, originated by Edmund Husserl around 1905.

phe·nom′e·no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
phe·nom′e·no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
phe·nom′e·nol′o·gist n.

phenomenology

(fɪˌnɒmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
1. (Philosophy) the movement founded by Husserl that concentrates on the detailed description of conscious experience, without recourse to explanation, metaphysical assumptions, and traditional philosophical questions
2. (Philosophy) the science of phenomena as opposed to the science of being
phenomenological adj
pheˌnomenoˈlogically adv
pheˌnomeˈnologist n

phe•nom•e•nol•o•gy

(fɪˌnɒm əˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. the study of phenomena as distinct from ontology.
2. the branch of a field of study that classifies phenomena relevant to itself.
3. the system of Husserl and his followers stressing the description of phenomena.
[1790–1800]
phe•nom`e•no•log′i•cal (-nlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
phe•nom`e•no•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
phe•nom`e•nol′o•gist, n.
ontology, phenomenology - Ontology is the branch of metaphysics concerned with the nature or essence of being or existence, the opposite of phenomenology, the science of phenomena.
See also related terms for phenomena.

phenomenology

1. the study of phenomena.
2. the philosophical system of Edmund Husserl and his followers, especially the careful description of phenomena in all areas of experience. — phenomenologist, n.phenomenologic, phenomenological, adj.
See also: Philosophy

phenomenology

A philosophical doctrine established by Husserl; the science of appearances.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phenomenology - a philosophical doctrine proposed by Edmund Husserl based on the study of human experience in which considerations of objective reality are not taken into account
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations

phenomenology

[fɪˈnɒmɪˈnɒlədʒɪ] Nfenomenología f

phenomenology

References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are two phenomenologists do not disagree, the new phenomenology of carrying forward, Arakawa and Gins: the organism-person-environment process, time's dependence on space: Kant's statements and Heidegger's misconstrual of them, and the responsive order: a new empiricism.
And, it is for this, and numerous other highly significant differences in meaning and intent that, unlike the great majority of existential phenomenologists who view Kierkegaard as a genuine, if not 'the first', full-fledged existentialist, I do not think it appropriate to place his writings within an existential phenomenological tradition.
With this systematic intent, Taipale works through Husserl's contribution to this topic, which should be of highest interest to phenomenologists and other philosophers interested in the phenomenon of consciousness alike, in three parts: Part I on "Selfhood and the Lived-Body," Part II on "Intersubjectivity," and Part III on "Normality and Objective Reality.
Gordillo, from a theoretical perspective, draws from diverse sources connecting the conceptualizations of materialists such as Marx, Adorno, Lefebvre, or even Badiou, with those of phenomenologists, like Merleau-Ponty, hermeneutics, such as Heidegger, or current post-structural thinkers, like Tsing, Stoler, or Latour.
Phenomenologists acknowledge each of us lives in a specific context.
Some authors of this volume place Augustine in the company of French phenomenologists Jean-Luc Marion and Jean-Louis Chretien, philosopher Charles Taylor, and even novelist Cormac McCarthy.
Even the most stoic of cognitivists and phenomenologists will find Brinkema's readings compelling.
He instead deploys a double strategy: Gallagher seeks to characterize canonical phenomenologists of the likes of Merleau-Ponty as having been engaged in philosophical projects that were not, strictly speaking, pure transcendental phenomenology, and he also outlines how phenomenology today can interact with contemporary empirical science without being reduced to it.
In this way the transcendentalists foreshadow the pragmatists and phenomenologists.
His invocation of the covenant draws out the point that the phenomenologists have overlooked.
But the study's lasting value resides in its author's creative application of insights derived from a deep acquaintance with the ideas of the phenomenologists Husserl and (particularly) Heidegger, thinkers who, for all their points of disagreement, insisted that the world we find ourselves in and our experience of it cannot be adequately addressed by empiricism on the one hand nor a priori reasoning on the other.
The infamous political affiliations of some phenomenologists have only strengthened such a negative image of phenomenology.