phenomenon


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phe·nom·e·non

 (fĭ-nŏm′ə-nŏn′, -nən)
n. pl. phe·nom·e·na (-nə)
1. An occurrence, circumstance, or fact that is perceptible by the senses.
2. pl. phe·nom·e·nons
a. An unusual, significant, or unaccountable fact or occurrence; a marvel.
b. A remarkable or outstanding person; a paragon. See Synonyms at wonder.
3. Philosophy In the philosophy of Kant, an object as it is perceived by the senses, as opposed to a noumenon.
4. Physics An observable event.

[Late Latin phaenomenon, from Greek phainomenon, from neuter present participle of phainesthai, to appear; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: Phenomenon is the only acceptable singular form of this noun; phenomena is the usual plural. Phenomenons may also be used as the plural in nonscientific writing when the meaning is "extraordinary things, occurrences, or persons": They were phenomenons in the history of music.

phenomenon

(fɪˈnɒmɪnən)
n, pl -ena (-ɪnə) or -enons
1. anything that can be perceived as an occurrence or fact by the senses
2. any remarkable occurrence or person
3. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the object of perception, experience, etc
b. (in the writings of Kant) a thing as it appears and is interpreted in perception and reflection, as distinguished from its real nature as a thing-in-itself. Compare noumenon
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek phainomenon, from phainesthai to appear, from phainein to show]
Usage: Although phenomena is often treated as if it were singular, correct usage is to employ phenomenon with a singular construction and phenomena with a plural: that is an interesting phenomenon (not phenomena); several new phenomena were recorded in his notes

phe•nom•e•non

(fɪˈnɒm əˌnɒn, -nən)

n., pl. -na (-nə) or, esp. for 3, -nons.
1. a fact, occurrence, or circumstance observed or observable: the phenomena of nature.
2. something that is remarkable or extraordinary.
3. a remarkable or exceptional person; prodigy.
4. Philos.
a. an appearance or immediate object of awareness in experience.
b. (in Kantian philosophy) a thing as it appears to and is constructed by the mind, as distinguished from a noumenon, or thing-in-itself.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin phaenomenon < Greek phainómenon appearance, n. use of neuter present participle of phaínesthai to appear, pass. of phaínein to show]
usage: As with other plurals of Latin or Greek origin, there is a tendency to use the plural phenomena as a singular (This phenomena will not be seen again); such use, which is usually criticized by usage guides, occurs infrequently in edited writing. See also criterion, media1.

phenomenon

A phenomenon is something that happens or exists and that can be seen or experienced.

We are witnessing a very significant phenomenon.
Many theories have been put forward to explain this phenomenon.

The plural of 'phenomenon' is phenomena, not 'phenomenons'.

...scientific explanations of natural phenomena.
All of these phenomena required explanation.

Be Careful!
Phenomena is only a plural form. You do not talk about 'a phenomena' or 'this phenomena'.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phenomenon - any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoningphenomenon - any state or process known through the senses rather than by intuition or reasoning
physical process, process - a sustained phenomenon or one marked by gradual changes through a series of states; "events now in process"; "the process of calcification begins later for boys than for girls"
natural phenomenon - all phenomena that are not artificial
levitation - the phenomenon of a person or thing rising into the air by apparently supernatural means
metempsychosis, rebirth - after death the soul begins a new cycle of existence in another human body
consequence, effect, result, upshot, outcome, event, issue - a phenomenon that follows and is caused by some previous phenomenon; "the magnetic effect was greater when the rod was lengthwise"; "his decision had depressing consequences for business"; "he acted very wise after the event"
fortune, hazard, luck, chance - an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that causes an event to result one way rather than another; "bad luck caused his downfall"; "we ran into each other by pure chance"
fortune, luck - an unknown and unpredictable phenomenon that leads to a favorable outcome; "it was my good luck to be there"; "they say luck is a lady"; "it was as if fortune guided his hand"
pulsation - a periodically recurring phenomenon that alternately increases and decreases some quantity
2.phenomenon - a remarkable development
development - a recent event that has some relevance for the present situation; "recent developments in Iraq"; "what a revolting development!"

phenomenon

noun
1. occurrence, happening, fact, event, incident, circumstance, episode scientific explanations of this natural phenomenon
2. wonder, sensation, spectacle, sight, exception, miracle, marvel, prodigy, rarity, nonpareil The Loch Ness monster is not the only bizarre phenomenon that bookmakers take bets on.

phenomenon

noun
1. Something having real, demonstrable existence:
2. One that evokes great surprise and admiration:
Idioms: one for the books, the eighth wonder of the world.
Translations
ظاهِرَه
jevúkazfenomén
fænomen
ilmiö
jelenségtüneménytünetfenomén
fyrirbæri
fenomenalusfenomenas
fenomensparādība
jav
pojav
pojava
fenomen

phenomenon

[fɪˈnɒmɪnən] N (phenomenons or phenomena (pl)) → fenómeno m

phenomenon

[fɪˈnɒmɪnən] [phenomena] [fɪˈnɒmɪnə] (pl) nphénomène m
to be a new phenomenon → être un phénomène nouveau
a natural phenomenon → un phénomène naturel

phenomenon

n pl <phenomena> → Phänomen nt

phenomenon

[fɪˈnɒmɪnən] n (phenomena (pl)) [fɪˈnɒmɪnə]fenomeno

phenomenon

(fəˈnomənən) , ((American) -non) plural pheˈnomena (-nə) noun
a natural fact or event that is seen or happens regularly or frequently. Magnetic attraction is an interesting phenomenon.
pheˈnomenal adjective
very unusual; remarkable. a phenomenal amount of money.
pheˈnomenally adverb

phe·nom·e·non

n. fenómeno.
evento o manifestación de cualquier índole;
síntoma objetivo de una enfermedad.

phenomenon

n fenómeno; Raynaud’s — fenómeno de Raynaud
References in classic literature ?
The unusual spectacle of her busy mother rocking comfortably and reading early in the morning made Jo feel as if some unnatural phenomenon had occurred, for an eclipse, an earthquake, or a volcanic eruption would hardly have seemed stranger.
Another phenomenon, still more strikingly modern, was a package of lucifer matches, which, in old times, would have been thought actually to borrow their instantaneous flame from the nether fires of Tophet.
I know that, to the common apprehension, this phenomenon of whiteness is not confessed to be the prime agent in exaggerating the terror of objects otherwise terrible; nor to the unimaginative mind is there aught of terror in those appearances whose awfulness to another mind almost solely consists in this one phenomenon, especially when exhibited under any form at all approaching to muteness or universality.
Upon this every soul was confounded; for the phenomenon just then observed by Ahab had unaccountably escaped every one else; but its very blinding palpableness must have been the cause.
Haley, who had been imbibing very freely of the staple of the evening, began to feel a sensible elevation and enlargement of his moral faculties,--a phenomenon not unusual with gentlemen of a serious and reflective turn, under similar circumstances.
Within a few years we have witnessed the phenomenon of a southeastward migration, in the settlement of Australia; but this affects us as a retrograde movement, and, judging from the moral and physical character of the first generation of Australians, has not yet proved a successful experiment.
I have sought to impart this relief to the more serious passages in the book, not only because I believe myself to be justified in doing so by the laws of Art -- but because experience has taught me (what the experience of my readers will doubtless confirm) that there is no such moral phenomenon as unmixed tragedy to be found in the world around us.
Thus it was, however; and the last drop of blood having been extracted from the flints, and the last screw of the rack having been turned so often that its purchase crumbled, and it now turned and turned with nothing to bite, Monseigneur began to run away from a phenomenon so low and unaccountable.
As Scrooge looked fixedly at this phenomenon, it was a knocker again.
and from observing that the women-servants who were about the place came out to look and giggle at me as a young phenomenon.
If they had asked me any more questions I should undoubtedly have betrayed myself, for I was even then on the point of mentioning that there was a balloon in the yard, and should have hazarded the statement but for my invention being divided between that phenomenon and a bear in the brewery.
To have sought a medical explanation for this phenomenon would have been held by Silas himself, as well as by his minister and fellow-members, a wilful self-exclusion from the spiritual significance that might lie therein.