philanthropist


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phi·lan·thro·py

 (fĭ-lăn′thrə-pē)
n. pl. phi·lan·thro·pies
1. The effort or inclination to increase the well-being of humankind, as by charitable aid or donations.
2. Love of humankind in general.
3. Something, such as an activity or institution, intended to promote human welfare.

[Late Latin philanthrōpia, from Greek, from philanthrōpos, humane, benevolent : phil-, philo-, philo- + anthrōpos, man, mankind.]

phi·lan′thro·pist n.

phi•lan•thro•pist

(fɪˈlæn θrə pɪst)

n.
a person who practices philanthropy.
[1720–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.philanthropist - someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-beingphilanthropist - someone who makes charitable donations intended to increase human well-being
bestower, conferrer, donor, giver, presenter - person who makes a gift of property

philanthropist

noun humanitarian, patron, benefactor, giver, donor, contributor, altruist, almsgiver He is a philanthropist and patron of the arts.
Translations
مُحْسِن، مُحِب للبَشَر
lidumilfilantrop
filantropistvelgører
čovjekoljubacfilantropfilantropkinja
emberbarát
mannvinur; góîgerîarmaîur
filantropľudomil
insansever kimse

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] Nfilántropo/a m/f

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] nphilanthrope m/f

philanthropist

nMenschenfreund(in) m(f), → Philanthrop(in) m(f) (geh)

philanthropist

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪst] nfilantropo/a

philanthropy

(fiˈlanθrəpi) noun
love for mankind, usually as shown by money given to, or work done for, other people. He shows his philanthropy by helping people who have been in prison.
philanthropic (filənˈθropik) adjective
giving money or other help etc to others. a philanthropic person; a philanthropic act.
phiˈlanthropist noun
a philanthropic person.
References in classic literature ?
A GREAT Philanthropist who had thought of himself in connection with the Presidency and had introduced a bill into Congress requiring the Government to loan every voter all the money that he needed, on his personal security, was explaining to a Sunday-school at a railway station how much he had done for the country, when an angel looked down from Heaven and wept.
Instructions were then despatched to the Philanthropist for the departure and arrival, in good time for dinner, of Mr.
I never fancied that you were a budding philanthropist," Aynesworth remarked, lighting a fresh cigarette.
Quale, with large shining knobs for temples and his hair all brushed to the back of his head, who came in the evening, and told Ada he was a philanthropist, also informed her that he called the matrimonial alliance of Mrs.
For though Sir Aaron was a philanthropist, and thus dealt with the darker side of our society, he prided himself on dealing with it in the brightest possible style.
If I can't, I'll save on something else," returned the jocose philanthropist.
I assure you that the most winning woman I ever knew was hanged for poisoning three little children for their insurance-money, and the most repellant man of my acquaintance is a philanthropist who has spent nearly a quarter of a million upon the London poor.
The philanthropist too often surrounds mankind with the remembrance of his own castoff griefs as an atmosphere, and calls it sympathy.
He is a philanthropist," answered the other; "and no doubt his motive in visiting Paris is to compete for the Monthyon prize, given, as you are aware, to whoever shall be proved to have most materially advanced the interests of virtue and humanity.
The melancholy possibility of having to "kill time" (especially for those who did not care for whist or solitaire) was a vision that haunted her as the spectre of the unemployed haunts the philanthropist.
Not that we are philanthropists, but that we need the investors in our big development scheme.
To this section belong economists, philanthropists, humanitarians, improvers of the condition of the working class, organisers of charity, members of societies for the prevention of cruelty to animals, temperance fanatics, hole-and-corner reformers of every imaginable kind.