philanthropy


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phi·lan·thro·py

 (fĭ-lăn′thrə-pē)
n. pl. phi·lan·thro·pies
1. The effort or inclination to increase the well-being of humankind, as by charitable aid or donations.
2. Love of humankind in general.
3. Something, such as an activity or institution, intended to promote human welfare.

[Late Latin philanthrōpia, from Greek, from philanthrōpos, humane, benevolent : phil-, philo-, philo- + anthrōpos, man, mankind.]

phi·lan′thro·pist n.

philanthropy

(fɪˈlænθrəpɪ)
n, pl -pies
1. the practice of performing charitable or benevolent actions
2. love of mankind in general
[C17: from Late Latin philanthrōpia, from Greek: love of mankind, from philos loving + anthrōpos man]
phiˈlanthropist, philanthrope n

phi•lan•thro•py

(fɪˈlæn θrə pi)

n., pl. -pies.
1. altruistic concern for human beings, esp. as manifested by donations of money, property, or work to needy persons or to institutions advancing human welfare.
2. a philanthropic act or donation.
3. a philanthropic institution.
[1600–10; earlier philanthropia < Late Latin < Greek philanthrōpía love for mankind. See phil-, anthropo-, -y3]

philanthropy

a deliberate affection for mankind, shown in contributions of money, property, or work for the benefit of others. Cf. misanthropy. — philanthropist, n.philanthropic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
voluntary activity of or disposition towards donating money, property, or services to the needy or for general social betterment. — philanthropic, adj.
See also: Charity
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.philanthropy - voluntary promotion of human welfare
economic aid, financial aid, aid - money to support a worthy person or cause

philanthropy

philanthropy

noun
Translations
حُب البَشَر، إحْسان
filantropielidumilnost
filantropivelgørenhed
filantropija
emberszeretet
mannúî; líknarstarfsemi
filantropasfilantropijafilantropiškas
filantropija
filantropiaľudomilnosť
insanseverlik

philanthropy

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪ] Nfilantropía f

philanthropy

[fɪˈlænθrəpi] nphilanthropie f

philanthropy

philanthropy

[fɪˈlænθrəpɪ] nfilantropia

philanthropy

(fiˈlanθrəpi) noun
love for mankind, usually as shown by money given to, or work done for, other people. He shows his philanthropy by helping people who have been in prison.
philanthropic (filənˈθropik) adjective
giving money or other help etc to others. a philanthropic person; a philanthropic act.
phiˈlanthropist noun
a philanthropic person.
References in classic literature ?
They will have to go north, where labor is the fashion,--the universal custom; and tell me, now, is there enough Christian philanthropy, among your northern states, to bear with the process of their education and elevation?
Won in youth to religion, she has cultivated my original qualities thus:- From the minute germ, natural affection, she has developed the overshadowing tree, philanthropy.
You are too charming to go in for philanthropy, Mr.
This idea will add the inducements of philanthropy to those of patriotism, to heighten the solicitude which all considerate and good men must feel for the event.
Let the advocates of a falsely called Philanthropy plead as they may for the abrogation of the Irregular Penal Laws, I for my part have never known an Irregular who was not also what Nature evidently intended him to be -- a hypocrite, a misanthropist, and, up to the limits of his power, a perpetrator of all manner of mischief.
He was, as this remark shows, a man full of philanthropy, and in every way fit for his office.
I am extremely indebted to your unbounded philanthropy," said Maria, rising and courtseying with great gravity; "do not doubt of its being honourably mentioned at"--
As for the purchase of myself, that was in the way of her commerce; and it is seldom, indeed, that philanthropy can overcome the habits of trade.
Accounts being wound up, and our professional connection disposed of, we both agreed that, as mammon was not our master, nor his service that in which we desired to spend our lives; as our desires were temperate, and our habits unostentatious, we had now abundance to live on--abundance to leave our boy; and should besides always have a balance on hand, which, properly managed by right sympathy and unselfish activity, might help philanthropy in her enterprises, and put solace into the hand of charity.
The scene was one, however, which might easily warm a heart less given to philanthropy than that of Marmaduke Temple.
And philanthropy seems to me to have become simply the refuge of people who wish to annoy their fellow-creatures.
It was in the library that he and May had always discussed the future of the children: the studies of Dallas and his young brother Bill, Mary's incurable indifference to "accomplishments," and passion for sport and philanthropy, and the vague leanings toward "art" which had finally landed the restless and curious Dallas in the office of a rising New York architect.