philosophic


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Related to philosophic: philosophy

phil·o·soph·i·cal

 (fĭl′ə-sŏf′ĭ-kəl) also phil·o·soph·ic (-ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or based on a system of philosophy.
2. Characteristic of a philosopher, as in equanimity, enlightenment, and wisdom.

phil′o·soph′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.philosophic - of or relating to philosophy or philosophers; "philosophical writing"; "a considerable knowledge of philosophical terminology"
2.philosophic - characterized by the attitude of a philosopher; meeting trouble with level-headed detachment; "philosophical resignation"; "a philosophic attitude toward life"
unemotional - unsusceptible to or destitute of or showing no emotion
Translations
رَصين، هادئفَلْسَفي
heimspekilegursem tekur hlutunum meî heimspekilegri ró
filozofický

philosophic

[ˌfɪləˈsɒfɪk] adjphilosophique

philosophic(al)

adjphilosophisch; (fig also)gelassen; to be philosophical about somethingetw philosophisch betrachten

philosophy

(fiˈlosəfi) plural phiˈlosophies noun
1. the search for knowledge and truth, especially about the nature of man and his behaviour and beliefs. moral philosophy.
2. a particular system of philosophical theories. I have a very simple philosophy (=attitude to life) – enjoy life!
phiˈlosopher noun
a person who studies philosophy, especially one who develops a particular set of theories. Rousseau was a famous philosopher.
ˌphiloˈsophical, ˌphiloˈsophic (-ˈso-) adjective
1. of philosophy. a philosophical discussion; philosophical works.
2. (of a person) calm, not easily upset or worried. He's had a lot of bad luck, but he's philosophical about it.
ˌphiloˈsophically adverb
phiˈlosophize, phiˈlosophise verb
to think about or discuss the nature of man, the purpose of life etc. He spends all his time philosophizing and never does any work.
References in classic literature ?
Idealism led him to philosophic anarchy, and his family threw him off.
I wondered if Moxon knew the significance and breadth of his thought--the scope of this momentous generalization; or had he arrived at his philosophic faith by the tortuous and uncertain road of observation?
The medieval chroniclers were mostly mere annalists, brief mechanical recorders of external events, and the few more philosophic historians of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries do not attain the first rank.
He was too philosophic and simple to be vindictive, and he lived too much in the world of mind to miss the creature comforts we were giving up.
He recalled his own criticisms of Tyndall of his complacent satisfaction in the cleverness of his experiments, and for his lack of philosophic insight.
He honestly mistook his sensuality for romantic emotion, his vacillation for the artistic temperament, and his idleness for philosophic calm.
I had four preferences: first, music; second, poetry; third, the writing of philosophic, economic, and political essays; and, fourth, and last, and least, fiction writing.
Then a soul which forgets cannot be ranked among genuine philosophic natures; we must insist that the philosopher should have a good memory?
Had he possessed a perfectly philosophic or scientific temper he would have hesitated.
Now there was left with him, at least, a philosophic acquiescence to the existing order--only a desire to be permitted to exist, with now and then a little whiff of genuine life, such as he was breathing now.
But there are perchance, other readers, who have not found it useless to study the aesthetic and philosophic thought concealed in this book, and who have taken pleasure, while reading "Notre-Dame-de-Paris," in unravelling beneath the romance something else than the romance, and in following
Not only does a good army commander not need any special qualities, on the contrary he needs the absence of the highest and best human attributes- love, poetry, tenderness, and philosophic inquiring doubt.