philosophise


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philosophise


Past participle: philosophised
Gerund: philosophising

Imperative
philosophise
philosophise
Present
I philosophise
you philosophise
he/she/it philosophises
we philosophise
you philosophise
they philosophise
Preterite
I philosophised
you philosophised
he/she/it philosophised
we philosophised
you philosophised
they philosophised
Present Continuous
I am philosophising
you are philosophising
he/she/it is philosophising
we are philosophising
you are philosophising
they are philosophising
Present Perfect
I have philosophised
you have philosophised
he/she/it has philosophised
we have philosophised
you have philosophised
they have philosophised
Past Continuous
I was philosophising
you were philosophising
he/she/it was philosophising
we were philosophising
you were philosophising
they were philosophising
Past Perfect
I had philosophised
you had philosophised
he/she/it had philosophised
we had philosophised
you had philosophised
they had philosophised
Future
I will philosophise
you will philosophise
he/she/it will philosophise
we will philosophise
you will philosophise
they will philosophise
Future Perfect
I will have philosophised
you will have philosophised
he/she/it will have philosophised
we will have philosophised
you will have philosophised
they will have philosophised
Future Continuous
I will be philosophising
you will be philosophising
he/she/it will be philosophising
we will be philosophising
you will be philosophising
they will be philosophising
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been philosophising
you have been philosophising
he/she/it has been philosophising
we have been philosophising
you have been philosophising
they have been philosophising
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been philosophising
you will have been philosophising
he/she/it will have been philosophising
we will have been philosophising
you will have been philosophising
they will have been philosophising
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been philosophising
you had been philosophising
he/she/it had been philosophising
we had been philosophising
you had been philosophising
they had been philosophising
Conditional
I would philosophise
you would philosophise
he/she/it would philosophise
we would philosophise
you would philosophise
they would philosophise
Past Conditional
I would have philosophised
you would have philosophised
he/she/it would have philosophised
we would have philosophised
you would have philosophised
they would have philosophised
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.philosophise - reason philosophically
cerebrate, cogitate, think - use or exercise the mind or one's power of reason in order to make inferences, decisions, or arrive at a solution or judgments; "I've been thinking all day and getting nowhere"
Translations
يُفَلْسِف
velta vöngum

philosophy

(fiˈlosəfi) plural phiˈlosophies noun
1. the search for knowledge and truth, especially about the nature of man and his behaviour and beliefs. moral philosophy.
2. a particular system of philosophical theories. I have a very simple philosophy (=attitude to life) – enjoy life!
phiˈlosopher noun
a person who studies philosophy, especially one who develops a particular set of theories. Rousseau was a famous philosopher.
ˌphiloˈsophical, ˌphiloˈsophic (-ˈso-) adjective
1. of philosophy. a philosophical discussion; philosophical works.
2. (of a person) calm, not easily upset or worried. He's had a lot of bad luck, but he's philosophical about it.
ˌphiloˈsophically adverb
phiˈlosophize, phiˈlosophise verb
to think about or discuss the nature of man, the purpose of life etc. He spends all his time philosophizing and never does any work.
References in classic literature ?
But not being at that time in a disposition to philosophise upon this phenomenon, I rather chose to observe what course the island would take, because it seemed for awhile to stand still.
All this was only a matter of habit, of course, because the Mugger had come ashore for pleasure; but a crocodile is never quite full, and if the Jackal had been deceived by the likeness he would not have lived to philosophise over it.
Not that the parting speech caused Amelia to philosophise, or that it armed her in any way with a calmness, the result of argument; but it was intolerably dull, pompous, and tedious; and having the fear of her schoolmistress greatly before her eyes, Miss Sedley did not venture, in her presence, to give way to any ebullitions of private grief.