phlegm


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phlegm

 (flĕm)
n.
1. Thick, sticky, stringy mucus secreted by the mucous membrane of the respiratory tract, as during a cold or other respiratory infection.
2. One of the four humors of ancient and medieval physiology, thought to cause sluggishness, apathy, and evenness of temper.
3. Sluggishness of temperament.
4. Calm self-possession; equanimity.

[Middle English fleume, mucous discharge, the humor phlegm, from Old French, from Medieval Latin phlegma, flegma, from Late Latin phlegma, the humor phlegm, from Greek, heat, the humor phlegm, from phlegein, to burn.]

phlegm′y adj.

phlegm

(flɛm)
n
1. (Physiology) the viscid mucus secreted by the walls of the respiratory tract
2. (Physiology) archaic one of the four bodily humours
3. apathy; stolidity; indifference
4. self-possession; imperturbability; coolness
[C14: from Old French fleume, from Late Latin phlegma, from Greek: inflammation, from phlegein to burn]
ˈphlegmy adj

phlegm

(flɛm)

n.
1. the thick mucus secreted in the respiratory passages and discharged through the mouth, esp. that occurring in the lungs and throat passages, as during a cold.
2. one of the four elemental bodily humors of medieval physiology, regarded as causing sluggishness or apathy.
3. sluggishness or apathy.
4. calmness; composure.
[1350–1400; Middle English fleem < Middle French flemme < Late Latin phlegma < Greek phlégma flame, phlegmatic humor =phlég(ein) to burn + -ma resultative n. suffix]
phlegm′y, adj. phlegm•i•er, phlegm•i•est.

phlegm

(flĕm)
Mucus produced by the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract.

phlegm

- Comes from Latin phlegma, "clammy moisture," and Greek phlegma, "inflammation."
See also related terms for inflammation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phlegm - apathy demonstrated by an absence of emotional reactionsphlegm - apathy demonstrated by an absence of emotional reactions
apathy - an absence of emotion or enthusiasm
2.phlegm - expectorated matter; saliva mixed with discharges from the respiratory passages; in ancient and medieval physiology it was believed to cause sluggishness
mucous secretion, mucus - protective secretion of the mucus membranes; in the gut it lubricates the passage of food and protects the epithelial cells; in the nose and throat and lungs it can make it difficult for bacteria to penetrate the body through the epithelium
3.phlegm - inactivityphlegm - inactivity; showing an unusual lack of energy; "the general appearance of sluggishness alarmed his friends"
inertia, inactiveness, inactivity - a disposition to remain inactive or inert; "he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work"

phlegm

noun
1. mucus, catarrh, sputum, mucous secretion Symptoms include vomiting and excess phlegm.
2. self-control, composure, coolness, cool (informal), calm, coldness, calmness, equanimity, self-assurance, self-possession, sangfroid, frostiness, level-headedness, unflappability (informal), stolidness They're taking it with the apathetic calm which many mistake for British phlegm.

phlegm

noun
Translations
بَلْغَم
hlen
slim
slejm
kvefslím
flegmatiškasskrepliai
krēpas

phlegm

[flem] N
1. (Med) (= mucus) → flema f
2. (= equanimity) → flema f

phlegm

[ˈflɛm] n (= mucus) → flegme m

phlegm

n (= mucus)Schleim m; (obs: = humour) → Phlegma nt; (fig) (= coolness)Gemütsruhe f, → stoische Ruhe; (= stolidness)Trägheit f, → Schwerfälligkeit f, → Phlegma nt

phlegm

[flɛm] nflemma

phlegm

(flem) noun
thick, slimy liquid brought up from the throat by coughing.
phlegmatic (flegˈmatik) adjective
calm; not easily excited. She's very phlegmatic – nothing would ever make her panic.

phlegm

n. flema.
mucus;
uno de los cuatro humores del cuerpo.

phlegm

n flema (frec. pl)
References in classic literature ?
Lotty, with Teutonic phlegm, was calmly eating bread and currant wine, for the jelly was still in a hopelessly liquid state, while Mrs.
Phileas Fogg and Sir Francis Cromarty, plunged to the neck in the peculiar howdahs provided for them, were horribly jostled by the swift trotting of the elephant, spurred on as he was by the skilful Parsee; but they endured the discomfort with true British phlegm, talking little, and scarcely able to catch a glimpse of each other.
At that I opened my mouth to speak, and found a hoarse phlegm choked my voice.
Monsieur de Treville," said the cardinal, with the greatest phlegm, "does not tell your Majesty that this innocent Musketeer, this gallant man, had only an hour before attacked, sword in hand, four commissaries of inquiry, who were delegated by myself to examine into an affair of the highest importance.
The Englishman received his thanks with the phlegm peculiar to his nation; and Morrel, overwhelming him with grateful blessings, conducted him to the staircase.
Paul's telling London it was midnight, and well do I recall the deep, deliberate tones, so full charged with colossal phlegm and force.
Soon the cries of the victims slaughtered in the poultry-yard, the hasty steps of Madame Cropole up that little wooden staircase, so narrow and so echoing, the bounding pace of Pittrino, who only that morning was smoking at the door with all the phlegm of a Dutchman; all this communicated something like surprise and agitation to the traveler.
He's getting on towards the end of his time wi' me," added the dairyman, with a phlegm which unconsciously was brutal; "and so I suppose he is beginning to see about his plans elsewhere.
But there is some obstruction or some excess of phlegm in our constitution, which does not suffer them to yield the due effect.
But in about three minutes she coughed up the phlegm and began to get better right away.
According to medieval physiology there were four chief liquids in the human body, namely blood, phlegm, bile, and black bile, and an excess of any of them produced an undue predominance of the corresponding quality; thus, an excess of phlegm made a person phlegmatic, or dull; or an excess of black bile, melancholy.
These two classes are the plagues of every city in which they are generated, being what phlegm and bile are to the body.