photon


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pho·ton

 (fō′tŏn′)
n.
The elementary particle of light and other electromagnetic radiation; the quantum of electromagnetic energy. The photon is the massless, neutral vector boson that mediates electromagnetic interactions.

pho·ton′ic adj.

photon

(ˈfəʊtɒn)
n
(Atomic Physics) a quantum of electromagnetic radiation, regarded as a particle with zero rest mass and charge, unit spin, and energy equal to the product of the frequency of the radiation and the Planck constant

pho•ton

(ˈfoʊ tɒn)

n.
a quantum of electromagnetic radiation, usu. considered as an elementary particle that is its own antiparticle and that has zero rest mass and charge and a spin of one.
[1926; < Greek phōt- (see phot) + -on1]
pho•ton′ic, adj.

pho·ton

(fō′tŏn′)
The smallest unit of light or other electromagnetic energy, having no mass and no electric charge. Photons behave both as particles and waves. See Note at electromagnetic radiation.

photon

A unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.photon - a quantum of electromagnetic radiation; an elementary particle that is its own antiparticle
gauge boson - a particle that mediates the interaction of two elementary particles
electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic wave, nonparticulate radiation - radiation consisting of waves of energy associated with electric and magnetic fields resulting from the acceleration of an electric charge
Translations

photon

[ˈfəʊtɒn] Nfotón m

photon

[ˈfəʊtɒn] nphoton mphoto opportunity nséance f de photos (pour la presse)photo-sensitive [ˌfəʊtəʊˈsɛnsɪtɪv] adjphotosensiblephoto session nséance f photophoto shoot photo-shoot [ˈfəʊtəʊʃuːt] nséance f photo

photon

nPhoton nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Their model, based on physical principles, puts forth the following scenario: As a single photon moves through the cloud of rubidium atoms, it briefly lands on a nearby atom before skipping to another atom, like a bee flitting between flowers, until it reaches the other end.
But an experiment by a team of scientists from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University has shown that photons can bind together in twos or threes, proof of interaction between them.
Canadian Solar will acquire a 51% shareholding in each of Photon Energy's five project companies in Australia that carry a total of 1.
Typically, physicists monitoring a photon can calculate the odds that it will have a particular characteristic, such as horizontal polarization, when it is measured.
The famous two photon interference was experimentally demonstrated by Hong, Ou and Mandel in 1987, (14) and the first realization of an entangled photon source using parametric down-conversion was demonstrated by Ou and Mandel in 1988.
For this reason, it is hard for a physicist to imagine how the 1 energy unit from the cell tower photon can matter.
As defined by theory, ALPs can turn into photons (and vice versa) in a strong magnetic field, like that in a blazar's core.
When the low-energy photons at the centre of the cavity reached a density of about a trillion photons per cubic centimetre, they began to act as a single photon, shifting in appearance from a blurry glow to a bright point.
The NIST photon detector uses a superconducting material to act as a temperature gauge.
In Ekert-style encryption, a laser device creates pairs of entangled photons and sends (along the fiber-optic cable) one photon from each entangled pair to Alice and the other one to Bob.
The Afshar experiment is one in which it is claimed one can both determine both which path a photon has followed and that the photon self interfered in one and same experiment, violating Bohr's complementarity principle, that complementary aspects of a system cannot simultaneously be measured.
v], and k denote the four-momentum of the neutron, proton, electron, anti-neutrino, and photon, respectively--we denote the photon energy by [omega].