photonovel


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photonovel

(ˈfəʊtəʊˌnɒvəl)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) a story, usually based on a film or TV episode, consisting of chronological photographs or film stills with dialogue enclosed in balloons, as in the style of a comic book
Translations
photoroman
References in periodicals archive ?
One year after the publication of Andre Breton's novel Nadja the Finnish author Hagar Olsson published her novel In the Kanaan Express Train (1929), a caleidoscopical composition, which "Knut Brynhildsvoll has called a photonovel.
Whether he finds himself swept along in an occupation, rallies the "proletariat" with an improvised speech that unfolds into a motivational exercise, sympathizes with the Evita depicted in a photonovel, or makes a narrow escape from the police, MarronA[c] emerges as a fascinating character whose intelligence combines with luck.
Some other terms that are used to describe this technique are photo novella, foto novella, and photonovel (Wang & Burris, 1997; Weaks, 1976).
The photonovel on gestational diabetes will be the premier novela for launching the national Teach-With-Stories (TWS) Free Publication Network.
The final photonovel reflects four cycles of field-testing and revisions based on feedback from Hispanic women in the community.
Their stories became an important objective and balancing point for the photonovel, i.
Unique design features, such as a bilingual, side-by-side layout, numbered dialog boxes, and a glossary with words linked to the story, make this photonovel a versatile teaching tool for English and Spanish.
This AIDS education photonovel is designed to convey AIDS prevention information to young black and Latino teens.
However, he never left the theater, going at it for three full years, learning from the masters, who had connections with "Fotonovelas," romantic photonovels consisting of still photographs and captions, often starring well-known television and movie stars.
In this way, they are able to distinguish intermedial (multimodal) photonovels, popular in many French- and Spanish-speaking countries and where photographs are arranged in sequence and combined with words presented in captions or speech balloons and that work similarly to television soap-operas and monomedial photonovels where the photo-sequences lack word-captions or speech balloons and images lay exposed to readers' interpretation.
In this second example, photonovels do not provide sufficient clues to allow spectators to establish a specific story exemplify a "radically indeterminate narrativity" (181).
Illustrating the nonnarative series, photonovels without words that do not provide sufficient clues to allow spectators to establish a specific story exemplify a "radically indeterminate narrativity" (181).