phylum


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phy·lum

 (fī′ləm)
n. pl. phy·la (-lə)
1. Biology A taxonomic category of organisms ranking below a kingdom and above a class. In the classification of plants, division often replaces phylum.
2. Linguistics A large division of possibly genetically related families of languages or linguistic stocks.

[New Latin phȳlum, from Greek phūlon, class; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

phylum

(ˈfaɪləm)
n, pl -la (-lə)
1. (Biology) a major taxonomic division of living organisms that contain one or more classes. An example is the phylum Arthropoda (insects, crustaceans, arachnids, etc, and myriapods)
2. (Linguistics) any analogous group, such as a group of related language families or linguistic stocks
[C19: New Latin, from Greek phulon race]

phy•lum

(ˈfaɪ ləm)

n., pl. -la (-lə).
1. the primary subdivision of a taxonomic kingdom, grouping together all classes of organisms that have the same body plan.
2. a category consisting of language stocks that, because of cognates in vocabulary, are considered likely to be related by common origin.
[1875–80; < New Latin < Greek phŷlon group with common ancestry, tribe, akin to phyein to bring forth, produce, be]
phy′lar, adj.

phy·lum

(fī′ləm)
Plural phyla
A group of organisms ranking above a class and below a kingdom. See Table at taxonomy.

phylum

any of the basic divisions of the plant or animal kingdom. Cf. phylon.
See also: Botany
any of the basic divisions of the plant or animal kingdom.
See also: Classification
any of the major subdivisions of the plant or animal kingdom. Cf. phylon. See also linguistics.
See also: Animals

phylum

A major group of organisms that is a subdivision of a kingdom, e.g. mollusks.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.phylum - (linguistics) a large group of languages that are historically related
linguistics - the scientific study of language
social group - people sharing some social relation
2.phylum - (biology) the major taxonomic group of animals and plants; contains classes
phylum Pyrrophyta, Pyrrophyta - a division of lower plants comprising unicellular and biflagellate algae that form starchy compounds
phylum Protozoa, Protozoa - in some classifications considered a superphylum or a subkingdom; comprises flagellates; ciliates; sporozoans; amoebas; foraminifers
Cryptophyta, phylum Cryptophyta - a phylum in the kingdom Protoctista
Chordata, phylum Chordata - comprises true vertebrates and animals having a notochord
Craniata, subphylum Craniata, subphylum Vertebrata, Vertebrata - fishes; amphibians; reptiles; birds; mammals
Arthropoda, phylum Arthropoda - jointed-foot invertebrates: arachnids; crustaceans; insects; millipedes; centipedes
phylum Porifera, Porifera - coextensive with the subkingdom Parazoa: sponges
Cnidaria, Coelenterata, phylum Cnidaria, phylum Coelenterata - hydras; polyps; jellyfishes; sea anemones; corals
Ctenophora, phylum Ctenophora - comb jellies; sea acorns; a small phylum formerly considered a class of Coelenterata
Acanthocephala, phylum Acanthocephala - phylum or class of elongated wormlike parasites that live in the intestines of vertebrates: spiny-headed worms
Chaetognatha, phylum Chaetognatha - arrowworms: a group of small active transparent marine worms
phylum Rotifera, Rotifera - a phylum including: rotifers
Aschelminthes, Nematoda, phylum Aschelminthes, phylum Nematoda - unsegmented worms: roundworms; threadworms; eelworms
Annelida, phylum Annelida - segmented worms: earthworms; lugworms; leeches
Mollusca, phylum Mollusca - gastropods; bivalves; cephalopods; chitons
Phoronida, Phoronidea, phylum Phoronida - small phylum of wormlike marine animals
Bryozoa, phylum Bryozoa, polyzoa - marine or freshwater animals that form colonies of zooids
Ectoprocta, phylum Ectoprocta - coextensive with or a subphylum of Bryozoa
Endoprocta, Entoprocta, phylum Entoprocta - sometimes considered a subphylum of Bryozoa
Cycliophora, phylum Cycliophora - tiny marine organisms each the size of a period found in great numbers on lobsters' lips; identified tentatively in 1995 as a new phylum or as possible link between Entoprocta and Ectoprocta
Brachiopoda, phylum Brachiopoda - marine invertebrates that resemble mollusks
phylum Sipuncula, Sipuncula - peanut worms
Echinodermata, phylum Echinodermata - radially symmetrical marine invertebrates including e.g. starfish and sea urchins and sea cucumbers
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
kingdom - the highest taxonomic group into which organisms are grouped; one of five biological categories: Monera or Protoctista or Plantae or Fungi or Animalia
taxon, taxonomic category, taxonomic group - animal or plant group having natural relations
subphylum - (biology) a taxonomic group ranking between a phylum and a class
class - (biology) a taxonomic group containing one or more orders
division - (botany) taxonomic unit of plants corresponding to a phylum
Translations

phylum

[ˈfaɪləm] N (phyla (pl)) (Bio) → filo m, phylum m

phylum

n pl <phyla> (Biol) → Stamm m
References in periodicals archive ?
Aquellos caracteres constitutivos por los que cada individuo pertenece real y fisicamente a un Phylum determinado, son justo los que constituye la especie: la esencia individual ha quedado especificada" (58.
Estos entes, que habitan los oceanos, tambien llamados tunicates y chorros marinos, corresponden al Phylum Chordata, al cual tambien pertenecemos los seres humanos; son sesiles y se fijan a las piedras o conchas, a diferencia de otros tunicados que nadan libres formando parte del plancton.
They are marine invertebrates from the phylum Echinodermata and are therefore more closely related to sea urchins and sea cucumbers than fish.
Eyes appear in the bilaterally symmetrical animals in the protostome invertebrate branch, including the Phylum Arthropoda (jointed leg animals), Annelida (segmented worms), and Mollusca (bivalves, snails, and cephalopods).
In any case, the observations here stand in stark contrast to some iower Palaeozoic sedimentological work in which marine fossils are lumped together at the class or even phylum level--the palaeontologist winces at this kind of generalization.
The edge of cruelty (malice is his term) Gregory Williams notes in his essay on Trockel's animal houses is the calling card of the machinic phylum.
Each of the resulting cells might have become separated from the cluster to become a phylum mother cell for the evolution of the species in that phylum.
It is caused by the aquatic funguslike organism Pythium insidiosum (kingdom Straminipila, phylum Oomycota, class Oomycetes) (1).
This genome provides a high quality draft sequence of a basidiomycete, a major fungal phylum that includes important plant and animal pathogens.
It is the spontaneous transition from the prototype worm-shaped or soft-bodied form to complex characteristics within each phylum, and it happened in a blink of an eye on the geological time scale.
Most people are familiar with members of the Phylum Arthopoda, which includes insects and crabs, and the Phylum Chordata, which contains animals with backbones like you, me, dogs, and elephants.