physic


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phys·ic

 (fĭz′ĭk)
n.
1. A medicine or drug, especially a cathartic.
2. Archaic The art or profession of medicine.
tr.v. phys·icked, phys·ick·ing, phys·ics
1. To act on as a cathartic.
2. To cure or heal.
3. To treat with or as if with medicine.

[Middle English phisik, from Old French fisique, medical science, natural science, from Latin, natural science, from Greek phusikē, feminine of phusikos, of nature, from phusis, nature; see bheuə- in Indo-European roots.]

physic

(ˈfɪzɪk)
n
1. (Medicine) rare a medicine or drug, esp a cathartic or purge
2. (Medicine) archaic the art or skill of healing
3. (General Physics) an archaic term for physics1
vb, -ics, -icking or -icked
(Medicine) (tr) archaic to treat (a patient) with medicine
[C13: from Old French fisique, via Latin, from Greek phusikē, from phusis nature]
ˈphysicky adj

phys•ic

(ˈfɪz ɪk)

n.
1. a medicine that purges; cathartic; laxative.
2. any medicine.
3. Archaic. the medical art or profession.
[1250–1300; Middle English fisyk(e), phisik(e) (< Old French fisique) < Latin physica natural science (Medieval Latin: medical science) < Greek physikḗ science of nature]

physic


Past participle: physicked
Gerund: physicking

Imperative
physic
physic
Present
I physic
you physic
he/she/it physics
we physic
you physic
they physic
Preterite
I physicked
you physicked
he/she/it physicked
we physicked
you physicked
they physicked
Present Continuous
I am physicking
you are physicking
he/she/it is physicking
we are physicking
you are physicking
they are physicking
Present Perfect
I have physicked
you have physicked
he/she/it has physicked
we have physicked
you have physicked
they have physicked
Past Continuous
I was physicking
you were physicking
he/she/it was physicking
we were physicking
you were physicking
they were physicking
Past Perfect
I had physicked
you had physicked
he/she/it had physicked
we had physicked
you had physicked
they had physicked
Future
I will physic
you will physic
he/she/it will physic
we will physic
you will physic
they will physic
Future Perfect
I will have physicked
you will have physicked
he/she/it will have physicked
we will have physicked
you will have physicked
they will have physicked
Future Continuous
I will be physicking
you will be physicking
he/she/it will be physicking
we will be physicking
you will be physicking
they will be physicking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been physicking
you have been physicking
he/she/it has been physicking
we have been physicking
you have been physicking
they have been physicking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been physicking
you will have been physicking
he/she/it will have been physicking
we will have been physicking
you will have been physicking
they will have been physicking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been physicking
you had been physicking
he/she/it had been physicking
we had been physicking
you had been physicking
they had been physicking
Conditional
I would physic
you would physic
he/she/it would physic
we would physic
you would physic
they would physic
Past Conditional
I would have physicked
you would have physicked
he/she/it would have physicked
we would have physicked
you would have physicked
they would have physicked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physic - a purging medicine; stimulates evacuation of the bowels
aloes, bitter aloes - a purgative made from the leaves of aloe
castor oil - a purgative extracted from the seed of the castor-oil plant; used in paint and varnish as well as medically
Epsom salts - (used with a singular noun) hydrated magnesium sulfate used as a laxative
laxative - a mild cathartic
medicament, medication, medicinal drug, medicine - (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease
milk of magnesia - purgative consisting of a milky white liquid suspension of magnesium hydroxide; used as a laxative and (in smaller doses) as an antacid
Rochelle powder, Seidlitz powder, Seidlitz powders - an effervescing salt containing sodium bicarbonate and Rochelle salt and tartaric acid; used as a cathartic

physic

noun
An agent used to restore health:
verb
To administer or add a drug to:
Informal: dope (up).
Translations

physic

(archaic) [ˈfɪzɪk] Nmedicina f

physic

n (obs)Arznei f; (cathartic) → Purgativ nt

phys·ic

n. medicamento, esp. un catártico o purgante.
References in classic literature ?
THERE is a wisdom in this; beyond the rules of physic: a man's own observation, what he finds good of, and what he finds hurt of, is the best physic to preserve health.
The case of the lady was in the other extreme from that of her husband: for as he was past all the assistance of physic, so in reality she required none.
On the contrary, I believe, if the number of those who recover by physic could be opposed to that of the martyrs to it, the former would rather exceed the latter.
In answer to this query, a rumour gained ground -- and however absurd, was entertained by some very sensible people -- that Heaven had wrought an absolute miracle, by transporting an eminent Doctor of Physic from a German university bodily through the air and setting him down at the door of Mr.
It the graveyard, originally Isaac Johnson's home- field, on one side, and so was well adapted to call up serious reflections, suited to their respective employments, in both minister and man of physic.
He is compounded of meat and wine and sparkle, of sun-mote and world- dust, a frail mechanism made to run for a span, to be tinkered at by doctors of divinity and doctors of physic, and to be flung into the scrap-heap at the end.
There could not be anything worse than that," said Lady Chettam, with so vivid a conception of the physic that she seemed to have learned something exact about Mr.
This book has grown out of an attempt to harmonize two different tendencies, one in psychology, the other in physics, with both of which I find myself in sympathy, although at first sight they might seem inconsistent.
I think that what has permanent value in the outlook of the behaviourists is the feeling that physics is the most fundamental science at present in existence.
In the early days after his return from Moscow, whenever Levin shuddered and grew red, remembering the disgrace of his rejection, he said to himself: "This was just how I used to shudder and blush, thinking myself utterly lost, when I was plucked in physics and did not get my remove; and how I thought myself utterly ruined after I had mismanaged that affair of my sister's that was entrusted to me.
But as soon as I had acquired some general notions respecting physics, and beginning to make trial of them in various particular difficulties, had observed how far they can carry us, and how much they differ from the principles that have been employed up to the present time, I believed that I could not keep them concealed without sinning grievously against the law by which we are bound to promote, as far as in us lies, the general good of mankind.
He was professor of physics in the high school, possessor of a large family, a meagre salary, and a select fund of parrot-learned knowledge.