physics


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Related to physics: quantum physics

phys·ics

 (fĭz′ĭks)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) The science of matter and energy and of interactions between the two, grouped in traditional fields such as acoustics, optics, mechanics, thermodynamics, and electromagnetism, as well as in modern extensions including atomic and nuclear physics, cryogenics, solid-state physics, particle physics, and plasma physics.
2. (used with a pl. verb) Physical properties, interactions, processes, or laws: the physics of supersonic flight.
3. (used with a sing. verb) Archaic The study of the natural or material world and phenomena; natural philosophy.

[From Latin physica, from Greek (ta) phusika, (the things) of nature, from neuter pl. of phusikos; see physic.]

physics

(ˈfɪzɪks)
n (functioning as singular)
1. (General Physics) the branch of science concerned with the properties of matter and energy and the relationships between them. It is based on mathematics and traditionally includes mechanics, optics, electricity and magnetism, acoustics, and heat. Modern physics, based on quantum theory, includes atomic, nuclear, particle, and solid-state studies. It can also embrace applied fields such as geophysics and meteorology
2. (General Physics) physical properties of behaviour: the physics of the electron.
3. (General Physics) archaic natural science or natural philosophy
[C16: from Latin physica, translation of Greek ta phusika natural things, from phusis nature]

phys•ics

(ˈfɪz ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
the science that deals with matter, energy, motion, and force.
[1580–90]

phys·ics

(fĭz′ĭks)
The scientific study of matter and energy and the relations between them.

Physics


the state or quality of having different properties along different axes. See also botany. — anisotropic, adj.
the condition of constant, uninterrupted variability of direction or position. — astatic, adj.
the theory of atoms.
the branch of physics that deals with living things. — biophysicist, n.biophysical, adj.
the study of heat and electricity.
the science that studies crystallization and the forms and structures of crystals. — crystallographer, n.crystallographic, crystallographical, adj.
a property of certain materials of being repelled by both poles of a magnet, thus taking a position at right angles to the magnet’s lines of influence.
the measurement of energy used in doing work. — dynamometer, n.dynamometric, dynamometrical, adj.
orientation in relation to a current of electricity. — electrotropic, adj.
the branch of physics that studies energy and its transformation. — energeticist, n.energeticistic, adj.
a doctrine that asserts that certain phenomena can be explained in terms of energy. — energist, n.
the application of alternating electrical current for therapeutic purposes. — faradic, adj.
the determination of focal length. — focimetric, adj.
static electricity. Also called Franklinic electricity.
a direct electrical current, especially one produced by chemical action. — galvanic, adj.
a work on the production of electric current by chemical means. — galvanologist, n.galvanological, adj.
the measurement of the strength of electric currents, by means of a galvanometer. — galvanometric, galvanometrical, adj.
the physics of the earth, including oceanography, volcanology, seismology, etc. — geophysicist, n.geophysical, adj.
the study of the behavior of rotating solid bodies. — gyrostatic, adj.gyrostatically, adv.
Chemistry. the study of salts. Also called halotechny.
the similarity of the crystalline forms of substances that have different chemical compositions. — homeomorphous, adj.
1. the science concerned with the laws governing water and other liquids in motion and their engineering applications.
2. applied or practical hydrodynamics.
the study of forces that act on or are produced by liquids. Also called hydromechanics. — hydrodynamic, hydrodynamical, adj.
the branch of hydrodynamics dealing with the laws of gases or liquids in motion. — hydrokinetic, adj.
hydrodynamics. — hygrometric, hygrometrical, adj.
the study of the equilibrium and pressure of liquids. — hydrostatician, n.hydrostatic, hydrostatical, adj.
the branch of physics concerned with the measurement of moisture in the air. — hygrometric, hygrometrical, adj.
close similarity between the forms of different crystals. See also biology. — isomorph, n.isomorphic, adj.
the branch of mechanics that deals with motion without reference to force or mass. — kinematic, kinematical, adj.
the study of magnets and magnetism.
the state exhibited by a crystal, having three unequal axes with one oblique intersection; the state of being monoclinic. See also biology. — monosymmetric, monosymmetrical, adj.
the technology of optical instruments and apparatus.
the study of the wave-forms of changing currents, voltages, or any other quantity that can be translated into electricity, as light or sound waves. — oscillographic, adj.
the measurement of osmotic pressure, or the force a dissolved substance exerts on a semipermeable membrane through which it cannot pass when separated by it from a pure solvent. — osmometric, adj.
the doctrine that explains the universe in physical terms.
the science that studies matter and energy in terms of motion and force. — physicist, n.physical, adj.
the theory that nature contains no vacuums. Cf. vacuism.plenist, n.
a property of some crystals of showing variation in color when viewed in transmitted light or from different directions. Also called pleochromatism, polychroism, polychromatism. — pleochroic, pleochromatic, adj.
pleochroism.
the study of fire and heat, especially with regard to chemical analysis.
the measurement of radiant energy by means of a radiometer, an instrument composed of vanes which rotate at speeds proportionate to the intensity of the energy source. — radiometric, adj.
the transformation of radiant energy into sound.
measurement of the distribution of energy in a spectrum by means of a spectrobolometer, an instrument combining a bolometer and a spectroscope. — spectrobolometric, adj.
the branch of mechanics or physics that deals with matter and forces in equilibrium. — statical, adj.
an apparatus for illustrating in graphic form the composition of two simple harmonic motions at right angles.
the science of operating or controlling mechanisms by remote control, especially by radio.
the science or study of the emission of electrons from substances at high temperatures. — thermionic, adj.
the science or study of the equilibrium of heat.
the science and technology of friction, lubrication, and wear.
a property, peculiar to certain crystals, of transmitting light of three different colors when viewed from three different directions. Also called trichromatism. — trichroic, adj.
1. the condition of having, using, or combining three colors.
2. trichroism. — trichromatic, adj.
Rare. the science of rotary motion. — trochilic, adj.
the theory that nature permits vacuums. Cf. plenism.vacuist, n.
electricity generated by chemical means, as in a cell or battery; galvanism.

physique

physics
1. 'physique'

Your physique (/fɪziːk/) is the shape and size of your body.

...a good-looking lad with a fine physique.
2. 'physics'

You do not use 'physique ' to refer to the scientific study of such things as heat, light, sound, and electricity. The word you use is physics (/fɪzɪks/).

...nuclear physics.

physics

The study of matter and energy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactionsphysics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
phase space - (physics) an ideal space in which the coordinate dimensions represent the variables that are required to describe a system or substance; "a multidimensional phase space"
containment - (physics) a system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material from a reactor
hodoscope - (physics) scientific instrument that traces the path of a charged particle
magnet - (physics) a device that attracts iron and produces a magnetic field
meniscus - (physics) the curved upper surface of a nonturbulent liquid in a vertical tube
nuclear reactor, reactor - (physics) any of several kinds of apparatus that maintain and control a nuclear reaction for the production of energy or artificial elements
metastability - the quality of a physical system that persists in its existing equilibrium when undisturbed (or only slightly disturbed) but able to pass to a more stable equilibrium when sufficiently disturbed
isotropy, symmetry - (physics) the property of being isotropic; having the same value when measured in different directions
wave-particle duality, duality - (physics) the property of matter and electromagnetic radiation that is characterized by the fact that some properties can be explained best by wave theory and others by particle theory
absorption factor, absorptivity - (physics) the property of a body that determines the fraction of the incident radiation or sound flux absorbed or absorbable by the body
reluctivity - (physics) the resistance of a material to the establishment of a magnetic field in it
rest mass - (physics) the mass of a body as measured when the body is at rest relative to an observer, an inherent property of the body
relativistic mass - (physics) the mass of a body in motion relative to the observer: it is equal to the rest mass multiplied by a factor that is greater than 1 and that increases as the magnitude of the velocity increases
gravitational mass - (physics) the mass of a body as measured by its gravitational attraction for other bodies
inertial mass - (physics) the mass of a body as determined by the second law of motion from the acceleration of the body when it is subjected to a force that is not due to gravity
mass energy - (physics) the mass of a body regarded relativistically as energy
flux density, flux - (physics) the number of changes in energy flow across a given surface per unit area
absorbance, optical density, photographic density, transmission density - (physics) a measure of the extent to which a substance transmits light or other electromagnetic radiation
quantum - (physics) the smallest discrete quantity of some physical property that a system can possess (according to quantum theory)
attracter, attractor - (physics) a point in the ideal multidimensional phase space that is used to describe a system toward which the system tends to evolve regardless of the starting conditions of the system
Bose-Einstein statistics - (physics) statistical law obeyed by a system of particles whose wave function is not changed when two particles are interchanged (the Pauli exclusion principle does not apply)
Dalton's law of partial pressures, law of partial pressures, Dalton's law - (chemistry and physics) law stating that the pressure exerted by a mixture of gases equals the sum of the partial pressures of the gases in the mixture; the pressure of a gas in a mixture equals the pressure it would exert if it occupied the same volume alone at the same temperature
Boltzmann distribution law, Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution law - (physics) a law expressing the distribution of energy among the molecules of a gas in thermal equilibrium
Fermi-Dirac statistics - (physics) law obeyed by a systems of particles whose wave function changes when two particles are interchanged (the Pauli exclusion principle applies)
Charles's law, Gay-Lussac's law, law of volumes - (physics) the density of an ideal gas at constant pressure varies inversely with the temperature
Hooke's law - (physics) the principle that (within the elastic limit) the stress applied to a solid is proportional to the strain produced
Kirchhoff's laws - (physics) two laws governing electric networks in which steady currents flow: the sum of all the currents at a point is zero and the sum of the voltage gains and drops around any closed circuit is zero
law of gravitation, Newton's law of gravitation - (physics) the law that states any two bodies attract each other with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them
law of thermodynamics - (physics) a law governing the relations between states of energy in a closed system
mass-energy equivalence - (physics) the principle that a measured quantity of mass is equivalent (according to relativity theory) to a measured quantity of energy
Planck's law - (physics) the basis of quantum theory; the energy of electromagnetic waves is contained in indivisible quanta that have to be radiated or absorbed as a whole; the magnitude is proportional to frequency where the constant of proportionality is given by Planck's constant
2.physics - the physical properties, phenomena, and laws of something; "he studied the physics of radiation"
natural science - the sciences involved in the study of the physical world and its phenomena
acoustics - the study of the physical properties of sound

physics

noun

Physics

Branches of physics  acoustics, aerodynamics, aerostatics, applied physics, astrophysics, atomic physics, biophysics, condensed-matter physics or solid-state physics, cosmology, cryogenics or low-temperature physics, dynamics, electromagnetism, electronics, electrostatics, geophysics, harmonics, high-energy physics or particle physics, kinetics, macrophysics, magnetics or magnetism, magnetostatics, mechanics, mesoscopics, microphysics, nuclear physics, nucleonics, optics, photometry, pneumatics, quantum mechanics, quantum physics, rheology, solar physics, sonics, spectroscopy, statics, statistical mechanics, superaerodynamics, theoretical physics, thermodynamics, thermometry, thermostatics, ultrasonics
Physics terms  acceleration, alternating current, ampere, amplifier, angstrom, anion, antimatter, atom, baryon, becquerel, Boyle's law, Brownian motion, cacion, calorie, capacitance, cathode ray, centre of gravity, centrifugal force, centripetal force, charge, Charles' law, conductor, convection, cosmic ray, coulomb, current, cyclotron, decibel, density, diffraction, diffusion, diode, direct current, Doppler effect, earth, electricity, electromotive force, electron, energy, farad, field, fission, fluorescence, force, frequency, friction, fuse, fusion, gamma ray, generator, gravity, half-life, hertz, hyperon, impetus, inductance, inertia, infrared, joule, kelvin, kinetic energy, laser, lens, lepton, luminescence, mass, matter, meson, microwave, moment, momentum, muon, neutrino, neutron, newton, nucleon, nucleus, ohm, Ohm's law, particle, pascal, Planck constant or Planck's constant, potential difference, potential energy, proton, quantum, radiation, radioactivity, radio wave, red shift, reflection, refraction, relativity, resistance, rutherford, semiconductor, simple harmonic motion, spectrum, static electricity, subatomic particle, superconductivity, superfluidity, surface tension, tau particle, tension, terminal velocity, thermostat, transformer, transistor, ultraviolet, vacuum, velocity, viscosity, volt, watt, wave, wavelength, x-ray
Physicists  Ernst Abbe (German), Jean Le Rond Alembert (French), Hannes Olaf Gösta Alfvén (Swedish), Luis Walter Alvarez (U.S.), André Marie Ampère (French), Carl David Anderson (U.S.), Elizabeth Garrett Anderson (English), Philip Warren Anderson (U.S.), Anders Jonas Ångström (Swedish), Edward Appleton (English), Archimedes (Greek), Svante August Arrhenius (Swedish), Francis William Aston (English), Pierre Auger (French), Amedeo Avogadro (Italian), Jacques Babinet (French), John Bardeen (U.S.), Heinrich Georg Barkhausen (German), Charles Glover Barkla (English), Nikolai Basov (Russian), Antoine Henri Becquerel (French), Georg von Békésy (U.S.), Daniel Bernoulli (Swiss), Hans Albrecht Bethe (U.S.), Gerd Binnig (German), Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett (English), Felix Bloch (U.S.), Aage Niels Bohr (Danish), Niels (Henrik David) Bohr (Danish), Ludwig Boltzmann (Austrian), Max Born (British), Jagadis Chandra Bose (Indian), Satyendra Nath Bose (Indian), Walter Bothe (German), Robert Boyle (Irish), Walter Houser Brattain (U.S.), Karl Ferdinand Braun (German), Auguste Bravais (French), David Brewster (Scottish), Percy Bridgman (U.S.), Maurice Broglie (French), Nicolas Leonard Sadi Carnot (French), Henry Cavendish (English), James Chadwick (English), Owen Chamberlain (U.S.), Jacques Charles (French), Pavel Alekseyevich Cherenkov (Soviet), Frederick Alexander Lindemann Cherwell (English), Rudolf Clausius (German), John Douglas Cockcroft (English), Arthur Holly Compton (U.S.), Leon Cooper (U.S.), Charles Augustin de Coulomb (French), James Watson Cronin (U.S.), William Crookes (English), Marie Curie (French), Pierre Curie (French), John Dalton (English), Clinton Joseph Davisson (U.S.), Peter Joseph Wilhelm Debye (Dutch), James Dewar (Scottish), Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac (British), C.J. Doppler (Austrian), Arthur Stanley Eddington (English), Albert Einstein (German-U.S.), Roland von Eötvös (Hungarian), Charles Fabry (French), Gabriel Daniel Fahrenheit (German), Michael Faraday (British), Gustav Fechner (German), Enrico Fermi (Italian), Richard Feynman (U.S.), Jean Bernard Léon Foucault (French), William Henry Fox Talbot (English), James Franck (U.S.), Joseph von Fraunhofer (German), Augustin Fresnel (French), Otto Frisch (Austrian-British), Klaus Fuchs (German-British), Galileo (Galilei) (Italian), William Gilbert (English), Donald Arthur Glaser (U.S.), Robert Hutchings Goddard (U.S.), Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (French), Hans Geiger (German), Murray Gell-Man (U.S.), Josiah Willard Gibbs (U.S.), Pierre Gassendi (French), Thomas Graham (English), Otto von Guericke (German), Otto Hahn (German), Stephen William Hawking (English), Oliver Heaviside (English), Werner Karl Heisenburg (German), Walter Heitler (German), Hermann Ludwig Ferdinand von Helmholtz (German), Joseph Henry (U.S.), Gustav Hertz (German), Heinrich Rudolph Hertz (German), Victor Francis Hess (U.S.), Robert Hooke (English), Christiaan Huygens (Dutch), Vladimir Nikolaievich Ipatieff (U.S.), James Hopwood Jeans (English), Brian David Josephson (English), James Prescott Joule (English), Heike Kamerlingh-Onnes (Dutch), Piotr Leonidovich Kapitza (Russian), William Thomson Kelvin (English), John Kerr (Scottish), Gustav Kirchhoff (German), Willis Eugene Lamb (U.S.), Lev Davidovich Landau (Soviet), Samuel Pierpont Langley (U.S.), Pierre Simon Laplace (French), Max Theodor Felix von Laue (German), Ernest Orlando Lawrence (U.S.), Tsung-Dao Lee (U.S.), Frederick Lindemann (German-British), Gabriel Lippman (French), Oliver Lodge (English), Hendrik Antoon Lorentz (Dutch), Edwin McMillan (U.S.), Guglielmo Marconi (Italian), Ernst Mach (Austrian), James Clerk Maxwell (Scottish), Julius Robert von Mayer (German), Lise Meitner (Austrian), Albert Michelson (U.S.), Robert Milikin (U.S.), Henry Gwyn-Jeffreys Moseley (English), Robert Sanderson Mullikin (U.S.), Louis Néel (French), Isaac Newton (English), Georg Simon Ohm (German), Mark Laurence Elwin Oliphant (Australian-British), J(ulius) Robert Oppenheimer (U.S.), Blaise Pascal (French), Wolfgang Pauli (U.S.), Roger Penrose (English), Jean Baptiste Perrin (French), Auguste Piccard (Swiss), Max (Karl Ernst Ludwig) Planck (German), Jules Henri Poincaré (French), Alexander Stepanovich Popov (Russian), Celic Powell (English), Ludwig Prandtl (German), Edward Mill Purcell (U.S.), Isidor Isaac Rabi (U.S.), John William Strutt Rayleigh (English), Owen Willans Richardson (English), Burton Richter (U.S.), Wilhelm Konrad Roentgen (German), Ernest Rutherford (British), Andrei Sakharov (Soviet), Erwin Schrödinger (Austrian), Glenn Seaborg (U.S.), Emilio Sègre (U.S.), William Bradfield Shockley (U.S.), Kai Siegbahn (Swedish), C.P. Snow (English), Johannes Stark (German), Joseph Wilson Swan (English), Leo Szilard (U.S.), Edward Teller (U.S.), Benjamin Thomson (Anglo-American), George Paget Thomson (English), Joseph John Thomson (English), Samuel Chao Chung Ting (U.S.), Evangelista Torricelli (Italian), Charles Hard Townes (U.S.), John Tyndall (Irish), James Van Allen (U.S.), R.J. Van de Graaff (U.S.), Johannes Diderik van der Waals (Dutch), Alessandro Volta (Italian), Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (Irish), Robert Alexander Watson-Watt (Scottish), Wilhelm Eduard Weber (German), Steven Weinberg (U.S.), John Archibald Wheeler (U.S.), Wilhelm Wien (German), Eugene Paul Wigner (U.S.), Charles Thomson Rees Wilson (Scottish), Chen Ning Yang (U.S.), Thomas Young (English), Hideki Yukawa (Japanese), Fritz Zwicky (Swiss), Vladimir Kosma Zworykin (U.S.)
Translations
fisika
فيزياءفِيزْياء
fyzika
fysik
füüsika
fysiikka
fizika
fizika
eðlisfræðieîlisfræîi
物理学
물리학
fizikafizikas
fizika
fyzika
fizika
fysik
ฟิสิกส์วิชาฟิสิกส์
vật lý

physics

[ˈfɪzɪks] NSINGfísica f

physics

[ˈfɪzɪks]
nphysique f
She teaches physics → Elle enseigne la physique.
modif [student] → en physique; [teacher, department, laboratory] → de physique

physics

n (sing: = subject) → Physik f; the physics of this are quite complexdie physikalischen Zusammenhänge sind hierbei ziemlich komplex

physics

[ˈfɪzɪks] nsgfisica

physics

(ˈfiziks) noun singular
the study of natural phenomena such as heat, light, sound, electricity, magnetism etc but not usually chemistry or biology. Physics is his main subject at university.
ˈphysicist (-sist) noun
a person who studies, or is an expert in, physics.

physics

فِيزْياء fyzika fysik Physik φυσική física fysiikka physique fizika fisica 物理学 물리학 natuurkunde fysikk fizyka física физика fysik วิชาฟิสิกส์ fizik vật lý 物理学
References in classic literature ?
He was so thorough that, when he became a Bell lawyer, he first spent an entire summer at his country home in Petersham, studying the laws of physics and electricity.
But as soon as I had acquired some general notions respecting physics, and beginning to make trial of them in various particular difficulties, had observed how far they can carry us, and how much they differ from the principles that have been employed up to the present time, I believed that I could not keep them concealed without sinning grievously against the law by which we are bound to promote, as far as in us lies, the general good of mankind.
Alas, my boy," said he, "human knowledge is confined within very narrow limits; and when I have taught you mathematics, physics, history, and the three or four modern languages with which I am acquainted, you will know as much as I do myself.
All these antique naturalists stood in advance of their centuries, yet were imbued with some of their credulity, and therefore were believed, and perhaps imagined themselves to have acquired from the investigation of Nature a power above Nature, and from physics a sway over the spiritual world.
The earth and the heavenly bodies, physics, and chemistry, we sensually treat, as if they were self-existent; but these are the retinue of that Being we have.
Moreover, his father, who was a man of thorough instruction, omitted no opportunity to consolidate this keen intelligence by serious studies in hydrography, physics, and mechanics, along with a slight tincture of botany, medicine, and astronomy.
Since we are talking about errors," said the king's procurator, "I have just been studying the figures on the portal below before ascending hither; is your reverence quite sure that the opening of the work of physics is there portrayed on the side towards the Hôtel-Dieu, and that among the seven nude figures which stand at the feet of Notre-Dame, that which has wings on his heels is Mercurius?
We shall not even take the trouble to demonstrate this, for it is an axiom in morals, as in physics.
The highest wisdom is not founded on reason alone, not on those worldly sciences of physics, history, chemistry, and the like, into which intellectual knowledge is divided.
Just as in physics the greater body draws to itself the lesser, would we not feel an overpowering attraction from that vast body of humanity which had passed into the unknown?
He was professor of physics in the high school, possessor of a large family, a meagre salary, and a select fund of parrot-learned knowledge.
Logic and physics were no part of his mental make-up.

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