physiognomy


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

phys·i·og·no·my

 (fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. phys·i·og·no·mies
1. Facial features.
2.
a. The art of judging human character from facial features.
b. Divination based on facial features.
3. Aspect and character of an inanimate or abstract entity: the physiognomy of New England.

[Middle English phisonomie, from Old French phisionomie, from Late Latin physiognōmia, from Greek phusiognōmiā, variant of phusiognōmoniā : phusio-, physio- + gnōmōn, gnōmon-, interpreter; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

(ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
1. a person's features or characteristic expression considered as an indication of personality
2. the art or practice of judging character from facial features
3. the outward appearance of something, esp the physical characteristics of a geographical region
[C14: from Old French phisonomie, via Medieval Latin, from Late Greek phusiognōmia, erroneous for Greek phusiognōmonia, from phusis nature + gnōmōn judge]
physiognomic, ˌphysiogˈnomical adj
ˌphysiogˈnomically adv
ˌphysiˈognomist n

phys•i•og•no•my

(ˌfɪz iˈɒg nə mi, -ˈɒn ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the face or countenance, esp. when considered as an index to the character.
2. the art of determining character or personal characteristics from the form or features of the body, esp. of the face.
[1350–1400; Middle English fis(e)namie, fisnomie < Middle French fisonomie < Medieval Latin phys(i)onomia < Late Greek physiognōmía, Greek physiognōmonía art of judging people by their features; see physio-, gnomon, -y3]
phys`i•og•nom′ic (-ɒgˈnɒm ɪk, əˈnɒm-) phys`i•og•nom′i•cal, adj.
phys`i•og•nom′i•cal•ly, adv.

physiognomy, physiognomics

1. the art of determining character or personal qualities from the features or form of the body, especially the face.
2. divination by examining the features of a face. — physiognomist, n. — physiognomic, physiognomical, adj.
See also: Facial Features

physiognomy

Character analysis using facial features.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
human head - the head of a human being
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
pudding face, pudding-face - a large fat human face
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom

physiognomy

noun face, features, look, clock (Brit. slang), dial (Brit. slang), countenance, visage, phiz (slang), phizog (slang) his thick black hair and bony Irish physiognomy

physiognomy

noun
An outward appearance:
Translations

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] Nfisonomía f

physiognomy

n (= face)Physiognomie f; (= study)Physiognomik f; (fig)äußere Erscheinung, Aussehen nt; the physiognomy of the Labour Partydas Gesicht der Labour Party

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] n (person's features) (Geog) → fisionomia; (art of judging character) → fisiognomia

phys·i·og·no·my

n. fisionomía, semblante, rasgos faciales.
References in classic literature ?
We were then, for reasons which it is not worth while to specify, in the close neighbourhood of Kerguelen Land; and now, when I open an atlas and look at the tiny dots on the map of the Southern Ocean, I see as if engraved upon the paper the enraged physiognomy of that gale.
Physiognomy, like every other human science, is but a passing fable.
That merry scamp's face whose beaming had so often restored serenity to the priest's sombre physiognomy, was now powerless to melt the gloom which grew more dense every day over that corrupted, mephitic, and stagnant soul.
Haply you don't know the physiognomy of the country?
The First Secretary observed this play of physiognomy steadily.
But a fortnight after his departure, to the surprise of those around her, she recovered from her mental sickness just as suddenly and became her old self again, but with a change in her moral physiognomy, as a child gets up after a long illness with a changed expression of face.
the duke, Gaston of Orleans, whose physiognomy, naturally rather majestic, had borrowed on this solemn occasion a fresh luster and a fresh dignity.
But Colbert, approaching him, offered to his eyes a physiognomy so different from that which he had been accustomed to see him wear; he appeared so good, so mild, so easy; his eyes took the expression of an intelligence so noble, that D'Artagnan, a connoisseur in physiognomies, was moved, and almost changed in his convictions.
Not anxious to come in contact with their fangs, I sat still; but, imagining they would scarcely understand tacit insults, I unfortunately indulged in winking and making faces at the trio, and some turn of my physiognomy so irritated madam, that she suddenly broke into a fury and leapt on my knees.
Anne of Austria looked with a sort of terror at the threatening aspect of the cardinal -- his physiognomy in such moments was not destitute of a certain grandeur.
Among the portraits was one of King George III Little Alice clapped her hands, and seemed pleased with the bluff good-nature of his physiognomy.
Indeed, a skilled eye could read so much in their physiognomy.