physiognomy


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phys·i·og·no·my

 (fĭz′ē-ŏg′nə-mē, -ŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. phys·i·og·no·mies
1. Facial features.
2.
a. The art of judging human character from facial features.
b. Divination based on facial features.
3. Aspect and character of an inanimate or abstract entity: the physiognomy of New England.

[Middle English phisonomie, from Old French phisionomie, from Late Latin physiognōmia, from Greek phusiognōmiā, variant of phusiognōmoniā : phusio-, physio- + gnōmōn, gnōmon-, interpreter; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

phys′i·og·nom′ic (-ŏg-nŏm′ĭk, -ə-nŏm′ĭk), phys′i·og·nom′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
phys′i·og·nom′i·cal·ly adv.
phys′i·og′no·mist n.

physiognomy

(ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
1. a person's features or characteristic expression considered as an indication of personality
2. the art or practice of judging character from facial features
3. the outward appearance of something, esp the physical characteristics of a geographical region
[C14: from Old French phisonomie, via Medieval Latin, from Late Greek phusiognōmia, erroneous for Greek phusiognōmonia, from phusis nature + gnōmōn judge]
physiognomic, ˌphysiogˈnomical adj
ˌphysiogˈnomically adv
ˌphysiˈognomist n

phys•i•og•no•my

(ˌfɪz iˈɒg nə mi, -ˈɒn ə mi)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the face or countenance, esp. when considered as an index to the character.
2. the art of determining character or personal characteristics from the form or features of the body, esp. of the face.
[1350–1400; Middle English fis(e)namie, fisnomie < Middle French fisonomie < Medieval Latin phys(i)onomia < Late Greek physiognōmía, Greek physiognōmonía art of judging people by their features; see physio-, gnomon, -y3]
phys`i•og•nom′ic (-ɒgˈnɒm ɪk, əˈnɒm-) phys`i•og•nom′i•cal, adj.
phys`i•og•nom′i•cal•ly, adv.

physiognomy, physiognomics

1. the art of determining character or personal qualities from the features or form of the body, especially the face.
2. divination by examining the features of a face. — physiognomist, n. — physiognomic, physiognomical, adj.
See also: Facial Features

physiognomy

Character analysis using facial features.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)physiognomy - the human face (`kisser' and `smiler' and `mug' are informal terms for `face' and `phiz' is British)
human head - the head of a human being
face, human face - the front of the human head from the forehead to the chin and ear to ear; "he washed his face"; "I wish I had seen the look on his face when he got the news"
pudding face, pudding-face - a large fat human face
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom

physiognomy

noun face, features, look, clock (Brit. slang), dial (Brit. slang), countenance, visage, phiz (slang), phizog (slang) his thick black hair and bony Irish physiognomy

physiognomy

noun
An outward appearance:
Translations

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] Nfisonomía f

physiognomy

n (= face)Physiognomie f; (= study)Physiognomik f; (fig)äußere Erscheinung, Aussehen nt; the physiognomy of the Labour Partydas Gesicht der Labour Party

physiognomy

[ˌfɪzɪˈɒnəmɪ] n (person's features) (Geog) → fisionomia; (art of judging character) → fisiognomia

phys·i·og·no·my

n. fisionomía, semblante, rasgos faciales.
References in classic literature ?
The truth was,--and it is Phoebe's only excuse,--that, although Judge Pyncheon's glowing benignity might not be absolutely unpleasant to the feminine beholder, with the width of a street, or even an ordinary-sized room, interposed between, yet it became quite too intense, when this dark, full-fed physiognomy (so roughly bearded, too, that no razor could ever make it smooth) sought to bring itself into actual contact with the object of its regards.
Physiognomy, like every other human science, is but a passing fable.
He was dressed in a coat of buffalo-skin, made with the hair outward, which gave him a shaggy and fierce appearance, perfectly in keeping with the whole air of his physiognomy.
Not anxious to come in contact with their fangs, I sat still; but, imagining they would scarcely understand tacit insults, I unfortunately indulged in winking and making faces at the trio, and some turn of my physiognomy so irritated madam, that she suddenly broke into a fury and leapt on my knees.
What my aunt saw, or did not see, I defy the science of physiognomy to have made out, without her own consent.
Provis (I resolved to call him by that name), who reserved his consent to Herbert's participation until he should have seen him and formed a favourable judgment of his physiognomy.
Indeed, now I could see that the petticoat was nothing short of a portrait of her, and that any one learned in the physiognomy of clothes would have been able to pick Sylvia out of a thousand by that spirited, spoilt, and petted garment.
Other attendants there were of a different description; two or three large and shaggy greyhounds, such as were then employed in hunting the stag and wolf; as many slow-hounds of a large bony breed, with thick necks, large beads, and long ears; and one or two of the smaller dogs, now called terriers, which waited with impatience the arrival of the supper; but, with the sagacious knowledge of physiognomy peculiar to their race, forbore to intrude upon the moody silence of their master, apprehensive probably of a small white truncheon which lay by Cedric's trencher, for the purpose of repelling the advances of his four-legged dependants.
heart, or a shilling for a pair of chromolithographic pictures or delft figures to place on his mantelboard, suffered greater privation for the sake of possessing a work of art than the great landlord or shareholder who paid a thousand pounds, which he was too rich to miss, for a portrait that, like Hogarth's Jack Sheppard, was only interesting to students of criminal physiognomy.
He saw, the history says, the very countenance, the very face, the very look, the very physiognomy, the very effigy, the very image of the bachelor Samson Carrasco
But in spite of this bettering of his circumstances, he made no change in his life, manners, or appearance, except that the red ribbon made a fine effect on his maroon-colored coat, and completed, so to speak, the physiognomy of a gentleman.
I had now an opportunity of observing him, and found him of a very marked physiognomy.