physis


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physis

(ˈfaɪsɪs)
n
(Anatomy) anatomy the part of a bone that is responsible for lengthening. Also called: growth plate

physis

1. the principle or concept of growth and change in nature.
2. nature considered as the source of growth and change.
3. something that grows or develops.
See also: Change, Growth, Nature
References in periodicals archive ?
14) In contrast, vertebral osteomyelitis originates from the active physis of the vertebral body in young animals and is more often associated with kyphosis.
It is led by the Spanish Institute of Oceanography based in Mallorca, with participants from the Cyprus Institute of Research, Technology and Innovation, NGO Enalia Physis Environmental Research Centre; Aix-Marseille University -- Mediterranean Institute for Biodiversity & Ecology in France; The Hellenic Centre for Marine Research in Greece; Centre Scientifique de Monaco in Monaco; the National Oceanography Centre in the United Kingdom and the University of Barcelona in Spain.
Disruption of the physis occurs often, leading to permanent growth defects and deformation throughout the patient's life.
Saturday sees premieres of two works at Huddersfield Town Hall -Hector Parra's L'absencia and James Dillon's Physis I & II.
The strong form is a metaphysical hypothesis because it concerns a reality that lies beyond the direct experience of man, and yet which is the physis upon which our experiential cosmos is constructed.
The living tree's development as an unfolding Physis
Unlike the being, the alpha brings the world together in the ultimate sense only through a common origin (genesis, in a sense, imposing the physis thinking), literally only at the beginning, and later the world can live in the fall and war.
Correction by stapling of the medial part of the distal tibial physis.
Lastly, a more horizontal physis is seen in those with almost total head involvement.
Since Aristotle many forms of ethical naturalism have been developed, each with different emphases but with the same basic structure, such as the view on physis and the human good of the Stoics or the Natural Law theory of Aquinas.
The epilogue presents a cautiously optimistic outlook that the technological changes identified in Chapter 1, provided they are accompanied by sufficient ethical analysis, can allow a successful integration of nature and technology - physis and techne.