piazza


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pi·az·za

 (pē-ăz′ə, -ä′zə)
n.
1. A public square, especially in an Italian town.
2. A roofed and arcaded passageway; a colonnade.
3. New England & Southern Atlantic US A veranda.

[Italian, from Latin platēa, street, from Greek plateia (hodos), broad (way), feminine of platus, broad; see plat- in Indo-European roots.]

piazza

(pɪˈætsə; -ˈædzə; Italian ˈpjattsa)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a large open square in an Italian town
2. (Architecture) chiefly Brit a covered passageway or gallery
[C16: from Italian: marketplace, from Latin platēa courtyard, from Greek plateia; see place]

pi•az•za

(piˈæz ə, -ˈɑ zə or, for 1,3, piˈæt sə, -ˈɑt-)

n., pl. pi•az•zas, It. piaz•ze (ˈpyɑt tsɛ)
1. an open public square in a city or town, esp. in Italy.
2. Chiefly New Eng. and Southern U.S. a large porch; veranda.
[1575–85; < Italian < Latin platēa courtyard < Greek plateîa]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piazza - a public square with room for pedestrianspiazza - a public square with room for pedestrians; "they met at Elm Plaza"; "Grosvenor Place"
public square, square - an open area at the meeting of two or more streets
Translations

piazza

[pɪˈætsə] N (US) → pórtico m, galería f; (= square) → plaza f

piazza

[piˈætsə] npiazza f

piazza

nPiazza f, → (Markt)platz m; (US: = veranda) → (überdachte) Veranda
References in classic literature ?
The parlor windows were closed and curtained, no picture of the pretty wife sewing on the piazza, in white, with a distracting little bow in her hair, or a bright-eyed hostess, smiling a shy welcome as she greeted her guest.
I wanted one downstairs that opened on the piazza and had roses all over the window, and such pretty old-fashioned chintz hangings
It was one of those spacious farmhouses, with high- ridged but lowly sloping roofs, built in the style handed down from the first Dutch settlers; the low projecting eaves forming a piazza along the front, capable of being closed up in bad weather.
For my humor's sake, I shall preserve the style in which I once narrated it at Lima, to a lounging circle of my Spanish friends, one saint's eve, smoking upon the thick-gilt tiled piazza of the Golden Inn.
Now, with elated step, they pace the planks in twos and threes, and humorously discourse of parlors, sofas, carpets, and fine cambrics; propose to mat the deck; think of having hangings to the top; object not to taking tea by moonlight on the piazza of the forecastle.
He could see the quaint little figure sitting on the piazza at North Riverboro and watch it disappear in the lilac bushes when he gave the memorable order for three hundred cakes of Rose-Red and Snow-White soap.
I am going to breakfast with one of these fellows who is at the Piazza Hotel, in Covent Garden.
Others crowded round the swinging doors of the coffee-house in the piazza.
As it is no inconsiderable affair to spend the Carnival at Rome, especially when you have no great desire to sleep on the Piazza del Popolo, or the Campo Vaccino, they wrote to Signor Pastrini, the proprietor of the Hotel de Londres, Piazza di Spagna, to reserve comfortable apartments for them.
Under this pretence he took Ramiro, and one morning caused him to be executed and left on the piazza at Cesena with the block and a bloody knife at his side.
The coach rumbled up to the piazza of the tavern, followed by a thousand people; for if any man had been minding his own business till then, he now left it at sixes and sevens, to hear the news.
I have been ploughing and sowing and raising and printing and praying, and now begin to come out upon a less bristling time, and to enjoy the calm prospect of things from a fair piazza at the north of the old farmhouse here.