pickerel

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Related to pickerels: Esox americanus, Esox niger, Grass Pickerel

pick·er·el

 (pĭk′ər-əl, pĭk′rəl)
n. pl. pickerel or pick·er·els
1. Any of several North American freshwater game fishes of the genus Esox, especially the chain pickerel.
2. The walleye.
3. Chiefly British A young pike.

[Middle English pikerel, diminutive of pike, pike; see pike2.]

pickerel

(ˈpɪkərəl; ˈpɪkrəl)
n, pl -el or -els
(Animals) any of several North American freshwater game fishes, such as Esox americanus and E. niger: family Esocidae (pikes, walleye, etc)
[C14: a small pike; diminutive of pike1]

pick•er•el

(ˈpɪk ər əl, ˈpɪk rəl)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -el, (esp. for kinds or species) -els.
1. any of several small pikes of the genus Esox.
2. the walleye, blue pike, or pikeperch.
3. Brit. a young pike.
[1300–50; Middle English pickerel. See pike1, -erel]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pickerel - flesh of young or small pikepickerel - flesh of young or small pike  
pike - highly valued northern freshwater fish with lean flesh
2.pickerel - any of several North American species of small pike
pike - any of several elongate long-snouted freshwater game and food fishes widely distributed in cooler parts of the northern hemisphere
chain pickerel, chain pike, Esox niger - common in quiet waters of eastern United States
barred pickerel, Esox americanus, redfin pickerel - small but gamy pickerel of Atlantic coastal states
References in classic literature ?
I don’t know, Benjamin,” returned the sheriff; “a haul of one thousand Otsego bass, without counting pike, pickerel, perch, bull- pouts, salmon-trouts, and suckers, is no bad fishing, let me tell you.
Once, in the winter, many years ago, when I had been cutting holes through the ice in order to catch pickerel, as I stepped ashore I tossed my axe back on to the ice, but, as if some evil genius had directed it, it slid four or five rods directly into one of the holes, where the water was twenty-five feet deep.
I have seen at one time lying on the ice pickerel of at least three different kinds: a long and shallow one, steel-colored, most like those caught in the river; a bright golden kind, with greenish reflections and remarkably deep, which is the most common here; and another, golden-colored, and shaped like the last, but peppered on the sides with small dark brown or black spots, intermixed with a few faint blood-red ones, very much like a trout.