pickled


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pick·led

 (pĭk′əld)
adj.
1. Preserved in or treated with pickle.
2. Slang Intoxicated; drunk.

pickled

(ˈpɪkəld)
adj
1. (Cookery) preserved in a pickling liquid
2. informal intoxicated; drunk

pick•led

(ˈpɪk əld)

adj.
1. preserved or steeped in brine or vinegar.
2. Slang. drunk; intoxicated.
3. (of woodwork) given an antique appearance, as by bleaching.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pickled - (used of foods) preserved in a pickling liquid
preserved - prevented from decaying or spoiling and prepared for future use

pickled

adjective
Slang. Stupefied, excited, or muddled with alcoholic liquor:
Informal: cockeyed, stewed.
Idioms: drunk as a skunk, half-seas over, high as a kite, in one's cups, three sheets in the wind.
Translations
mariniran

pickled

[ˈpɪkld]
A. ADJ
1. [food] → escabechado, encurtido, en conserva
2. to be pickled (= drunk) → estar jumado
B. CPD pickled onions NPLcebollas fpl en vinagre
pickled herrings NPLarenques mpl en escabeche
pickled walnuts NPLnueces fpl adobadas

pickled

[ˈpɪkəld] adj [food] → au vinaigre
Herrings can be salted, smoked or pickled → Les harengs peuvent être salés, fumés ou au vinaigre. pickled onionspickled onions nplpetits oignons mpl au vinaigrepickling onions nploignons mpl grelotspick-me-up [ˈpɪkmiʌp] nremontant mpick 'n' mix pick-and-mix [ˌpɪkənˈmɪks]
n (= sweets) → assortiment m à composer
vi (fig)choisir à la carte
vt (fig)choisir à la carte
modif (fig) [approach] → à la carte

pickled

adj
pred (inf: = drunk) → besoffen (inf), → alkoholisiert (inf)
References in classic literature ?
Why, I owe at least a dozen pickled limes, and I can't pay them, you know, till I have money, for Marmee forbade my having anything charged at the shop.
Anna and Yulka showed me three small barrels; one full of dill pickles, one full of chopped pickles, and one full of pickled watermelon rinds.
However, the masts did not go overboard; and by and bye we scrambled down, so sober, that we had to pass the flip again, though the savage salt spray bursting down the forecastle scuttle, rather too much diluted and pickled it to my taste.
Among them I remember a double set of pigs' trotters, a huge pin-cushion, half a bushel or so of apples, a pair of jet earrings, some Spanish onions, a box of dominoes, a canary bird and cage, and a leg of pickled pork.
We were to have a superb dinner, consisting of a leg of pickled pork and greens, and a pair of roast stuffed fowls.
Foraging about, I found a bottle with some brandy left, for Hands; and for myself I routed out some biscuit, some pickled fruits, a great bunch of raisins, and a piece of cheese.
These several productions of the sea were immediately lowered through the panel to the steward's room, some to be eaten fresh, and others pickled.
The Wandle, the Mole, every little stream, was a heaped mass of red weed, in appearance between butcher's meat and pickled cabbage.
Palfrey, like other geniuses, wrought by instinct rather than by rule, and possessed no receipts--indeed, despised all people who used them, observing that people who pickled by book, must pickle by weights and measures, and such nonsense; as for herself, her weights and measures were the tip of her finger and the tip of her tongue, and if you went nearer, why, of course, for dry goods like flour and spice, you went by handfuls and pinches, and for wet, there was a middle-sized jug-- quite the best thing whether for much or little, because you might know how much a teacupful was if you'd got any use of your senses, and you might be sure it would take five middle-sized jugs to make a gallon.
I've never seen a man die under the lash, but gangrene may set up if the kourbash has been pickled.
You must know that, in a climate so sultry as mine, it is frequently impossible to keep a spirit alive for more than two or three hours; and after death, unless pickled immediately (and a pickled spirit is not good), they will - smell - you understand, eh?
His name was Morton, and he was a Liverpool man long pickled in the Irish quarrels, and doing his duty among them in a sour fashion not altogether unsympathetic.