pictorialist


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pictorialist

(pɪkˈtɔːrɪəlɪst)
n
(Photography) photog a follower or believer in the pictorialism movement
References in periodicals archive ?
Her early art photographs were Pictorialist in style, characterized by soft focus and allegorical themes.
Beginning in the 1880s and concluding in the 1930s, Impressionist to Modernist illustrates the progression of photography from the painterly, Impressionistic work of the Pictorialist movement, through the 20th century rise of "straight" photography-a Modernist approach that advocated that photographs be nothing more than direct representation of the world, free from artificial manipulation of the image through lenses, tinting, or processing.
Accompanied by an extensive catalogue, this exhibition of some 250 photographs and three films spans Strand's career, from his Pictorialist origins and brilliant experiments of the 1910s and '2Us through the extended portraits of places--from Mexico to Ghana--that occupied him from the '30s through the '60s.
In her study of Parnassian poetry in France and Russia, Maria Rubins explains that no other group of European poets produced more pictorialist and ekphrastic poetry, and Machado was well aware of this.
Influenced by the Pictorialist arts movement, Curtis's photos were characterized by soft-focus, shadowed lighting and sentimental staging to evince highly evocative and romanticized images.
Mr Hunter decided to use a pinhole camera to connect to the early history of photography and the Pictorialist movement, whose members experimented with chemical processes and printing techniques in an effort to elevate their pictures to an art form equal to painting.
the pictorialist composition has been a characteristic of landscapes at
The resulting effects are visually similar to the soft-focus and richly textured carbon and gum bichromate prints produced at the end of the 19th century by pictorialist photographers such as Robert Demachy (1859-1936), Frank Eugene (1865-1936), and Anne Brigman (1869-1950), who enlisted painterly techniques to elevate the medium of photography into the realm of fine art.
The pictorialist landscapes, in which all references to industrial society and social unrest were kept out of frame, can be read as reassuring images in the salons of a bourgeoisie that suffered from a fundamental anxiety about the social changes that were on their way (see Melon 279).
This represents a pictorialist tradition of cartography in which maps are envisioned as platforms that are used to psychologically or emotionally express a map maker's view or perspective.
He tends to undervalue the poem's visual effects: "What is achieved, though it works by way of the visible, is no picture of the thing glimpsed" (185); he notes that the poem delivers "post-Symbolist poetry from its pictorialist impasse" (185); the power of the poem comes from the "mind's invisible action" (186).