picturization


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picturization

(ˌpɪktʃəraɪˈzeɪʃən) or

picturisation

n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) the act or process of picturizing something
2. (Film) the act or process of picturizing something
References in periodicals archive ?
His naughty facial gestures, bold romanticism and alluring performance style during picturization of songs made him immensely popular.
First, with its upbeat melody and Vijay's comic antics in the picturization, this song is a light-hearted take on the "male gaze," almost a parody.
Saudi Arabia has immense talent in artistic spheres and has the potential to produce more scripts on topics of social importance if it is accorded decent picturization and sound financial backing," said Heba Farahat, a mixed media artist born to a Saudi father and a German mother working in Riyadh.
Every Irish man and woman, every one descended from an Irishman, and everyone who is interested in Ireland, should be sure to see the picturization of this gallant little country's fight for freedom.
The call for national unity was emphasized with the picturization of a song at the spinning wheel.
The promotion of Bollywood music on music channels in which it must compete for attention with non-film music compels Bollywood to adapt the music video idiom in the picturization of its songs and dance.
Two other features of this song picturization are worth noting: first the camera captures the effect of the song on the listener.
In a discussion of "Hollywood imaginings of African-American religion," Weisenfeld commented that "the cumulative effect of constant picturization of this kind is tremendously effective in shaping racial attitudes.
His picturization of the title song of 'Chaudavin ka Chand' mesmerised the audience.
4) My thanks to Niyati Thakur whose paper "Film Songs and the Picturization of Identity in Lagaan" (unpublished, delivered at the 31st Conference on South Asia, October 2002) began to explore the Krishna imagery in the "O Rey Chhori" scene and started my thinking along these lines.
Zakaria charges that Rushdie "opened old wounds" by his "lurid picturization of this incident" (15).