pier


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Related to pier: pier foundation

pier

 (pîr)
n.
1.
a. A platform extending from a shore over water and supported by piles or pillars, used to secure, protect, and provide access to ships or boats.
b. Such a structure used predominantly for entertainment.
2. A supporting structure at the junction of connecting spans of a bridge.
3. Architecture Any of various vertical supporting structures, especially:
a. A pillar, generally rectangular in cross section, supporting an arch or roof.
b. The portion of a wall between windows, doors, or other openings.
c. A reinforcing structure that projects from a wall; a buttress.

[Middle English per, bridge support, partly from Norman French pere, piere (from Old French puiere, a support, from puie, from puier, to support, from Vulgar Latin *podiāre, from Latin podium, platform; see podium) and partly from Medieval Latin pera (from Old North French pire, piere, breakwater, possibly from Latin petra, rock, from Greek petrā; see per-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]

pier

(pɪə)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a structure with a deck that is built out over water, and used as a landing place, promenade, etc
2. (Architecture) a pillar that bears heavy loads, esp one of rectangular cross section
3. (Architecture) the part of a wall between two adjacent openings
4. (Architecture) another name for buttress1
[C12 per, from Anglo-Latin pera pier supporting a bridge]

pier

(pɪər)

n.
1. a structure built on posts extending from land out over water, used as a landing place for ships, an entertainment area, etc.
2. (in a bridge or the like) a support for the ends of adjacent spans.
3. a square pillar.
4. a portion of wall between doors, windows, etc.
5. a pillar or post on which a gate or door is hung.
6. a support of masonry, steel, or the like for sustaining vertical pressure.
[before 1150; Middle English pere < Anglo-Latin pera, pēra pier of a bridge, of obscure orig.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pier - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by pilespier - a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats
bitt, bollard - a strong post (as on a wharf or quay or ship for attaching mooring lines); "the road was closed to vehicular traffic with bollards"
levee - a pier that provides a landing place on a river
platform - a raised horizontal surface; "the speaker mounted the platform"
quay - wharf usually built parallel to the shoreline
shipside - the part of a wharf that is next to a ship
2.pier - (architecture) a vertical supporting structure (as a portion of wall between two doors or windows)
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"
wall - an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"
architecture - the discipline dealing with the principles of design and construction and ornamentation of fine buildings; "architecture and eloquence are mixed arts whose end is sometimes beauty and sometimes use"
3.pier - a support for two adjacent bridge spans
bridge, span - a structure that allows people or vehicles to cross an obstacle such as a river or canal or railway etc.
support - any device that bears the weight of another thing; "there was no place to attach supports for a shelf"

pier

noun
1. jetty, wharf, quay, promenade, landing place The lifeboats were moored at the pier.
2. pillar, support, post, column, pile, piling, upright, buttress the cross-beams bracing the piers of the jetty
Translations
دَعامَةرَصيف، جِسْر
molo
molebådebro
laituri
lukobran
bryggja
埠頭
부두
moles
pirsas
dambis, piestātne
mólo
pomol
bryggapir
ท่าเรือ
cầu cảng

pier

[pɪəʳ] N
1. (= amusement centre) paseo marítimo situado como zona de ocio sobre un muelle o malecón; (= landing-stage) → embarcadero m, muelle m
2. (Archit) → pilar m, columna f; [of bridge] → estribo m, pila f

pier

[ˈpɪər] n
(= walkway) → jetée f
[bridge] → pile f

pier

n
Pier m or f; (= landing place)Anlegestelle f, → Pier m or f
(of bridge etc)Pfeiler m

pier

[pɪəʳ] npontile m; (landing stage) → imbarcadero, pontile; (of bridge) → pila

pier

(piə) noun
a platform of stone, wood etc stretching from the shore into the sea, a lake etc, used as a landing-place for boats or as a place of entertainment. The passengers stepped down on to the pier.

pier

دَعامَة molo mole Pier προκυμαία embarcadero laituri jetée lukobran molo 埠頭 부두 pier brygge molo píer, pontão пирс pir ท่าเรือ rıhtım cầu cảng 码头
References in classic literature ?
Damon would have to do would be to meet him at the pier in New York, where they would find all arrangements made.
The rocky island and the two caverns are known to every traveler, since the former sustains the pier of a bridge, which is now thrown across the river, immediately above the fall.
The band on the pier is playing a harsh waltz in good time, and further along the quay there is a Salvation Army meeting in a back street.
Three hours before the Abraham Lincoln left Brooklyn pier, I received a letter worded as follows:
A jetty pier, some two thousand yards along, extended into the roadstead.
The officer leaped to the pier, and offered his hand to Milady.
You first, Musqueton," and he stopped his friends, directing the valets to go first, in order to test the plank leading from the pier to the boat.
Just round the corner, as it were, on a pier defined with stone blocks and wooden piles, a white mast, slender like a stalk of straw and crossed by a yard like a knitting-needle, flying the signals of flag and balloon, watches over a set of heavy dock- gates.
I could scarcely hear his words: and no wonder: he was leaning over the side of a ship, that was miles away from the pier on which I stood.
After the first pier was made they never thought to look down the stream for the body to burn.
The party from Uppercross passing down by the now deserted and melancholy looking rooms, and still descending, soon found themselves on the sea-shore; and lingering only, as all must linger and gaze on a first return to the sea, who ever deserved to look on it at all, proceeded towards the Cobb, equally their object in itself and on Captain Wentworth's account: for in a small house, near the foot of an old pier of unknown date, were the Harvilles settled.
Day, raising his hat at the same time to the little girl, whom he had not yet greeted and who dodged his salute by swinging herself boldly outward to the dangerous side of the pier.