pierid

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Related to pierids: Lycaenidae, Satyridae, Nymphalidae

pierid

(ˈpaɪərɪd)
n
(Animals) any pieridine butterfly
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pierid - any of numerous pale-colored butterflies having three pairs of well-developed legspierid - any of numerous pale-colored butterflies having three pairs of well-developed legs
butterfly - diurnal insect typically having a slender body with knobbed antennae and broad colorful wings
family Pieridae, Pieridae - arthropod family including cabbage butterflies; sulphur butterflies
cabbage butterfly - white butterfly whose larvae (cabbageworms) feed on cabbage
References in periodicals archive ?
rapae means its density on the landscape as a whole is also likely to be lower, which should help reduce its parasitism rates to native pierids such as Pieris oleracea Harris (Her lihy 2012).
The data collected on the foraging visits of butterflies of each family showed that Nymphalids made 63%, Lycaenids 18%, Papilionids 9%, Pierids 7%, and Hesperiids 3% of total visits (Fig.
The total number of butterfly species probably exceeds 400, with high rates of Satyridae, Lycaenidae and Pierids families.
epaphus, Actinote anteas, and the pierids Eurema salome and Phoebis sennae.
pilumnus), and 14 of 27 pierids are new records for Guanajuato (Anteos clorinde, Phoebis a.
Sympatric species of pierids often show less differentiation, and the question of the degree of genetic isolation between them is a natural one, both here and in many such groups of organisms.
Other pierid butterflies with similar life histories are readily recaptured at distances greater than 1 km (Baker 1968; Jones et al.
Although there appear to be no adapted aquatic herbivores in North America, emergent watercress is subject to attack by both aquatic shredders and terrestrial specialists such as pierids and chrysomelids (R.
rubecula is host specific, it rarely attacks native pierids in the field (Van Driesche et al.
rapae) and lessening the damage to non-target native pierids from C.
Euphorbiaceae) are planted, and these flowers were very attractive to pierids (larger species) and swallowtails; however, regular visits to the boundary between both areas, crop fields or even roadsides provided unusual butterfly records.