pietism


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Related to pietism: Methodism

pi·e·tism

 (pī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Stress on the emotional and personal aspects of religion.
2. Affected or exaggerated piety.
3. Pietism A reform movement in the German Lutheran Church during the 1600s and 1700s, which strove to renew the devotional ideal in the Protestant religion.

[German Pietismus, from Latin pietās, piety; see piety.]

pi′e·tist n.
pi′e·tis′tic adj.
pi′e·tis′ti·cal·ly adv.

pietism

(ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a less common word for piety
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) excessive, exaggerated, or affected piety or saintliness
ˈpietist n
ˌpieˈtistic, ˌpieˈtistical adj

Pietism

(ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzəm)
n
(Historical Terms) history a reform movement in the German Lutheran Churches during the 17th and 18th centuries that strove to renew the devotional ideal
ˈPietist n

Pi•e•tism

(ˈpaɪ ɪˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. a movement in the Lutheran Church in Germany in the 17th century that stressed personal piety over religious formality and orthodoxy.
2. (l.c.) intensity of religious devotion or feeling.
3. (l.c.) exaggeration or affectation of piety.
[1690–1700; < German Pietismus < Latin piet(ās) piety + German -ismus -ism]
Pi′e•tist, n.
pi`e•tis′tic, pi`e•tis′ti•cal, adj.
pi`e•tis′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Pietism

1. a movement, begun in the 17th-century German Lutheran Church, exalting the practice of personal piety over religious orthodoxy and ritual.
2. the principles and practices of the Pietists. Also called Spenerism. — Piëtist, n. — Pietistic, Pietistical, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pietism - 17th and 18th-century German movement in the Lutheran Church stressing personal piety and devotion
religious movement - a movement intended to bring about religious reforms
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
2.pietism - exaggerated or affected piety and religious zeal
devoutness, religiousness - piety by virtue of being devout

pietism

noun
A state of often extreme religious ardour:
Translations

pietism

[ˈpaɪətɪzəm] Npiedad f, devoción f (pej) → beatería f, mojigatería f

pietism

n
Pietismder Pietismus
(= piety)Pietät f, → Frömmigkeit f; (pej)Frömmelei f

pietism

[ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzm] npietismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Three other essays examine Luther reception in the later Reformation and Protestant Orthodoxy, as well as in Pietism and the Enlightenment, and in the Luther Renaissance.
Allan Aubrey Boesak and Curtiss Paul DeYoung, Radical Reconciliation: Beyond Political Pietism and Christian Quietism.
He was also influenced by strands of Dutch pietism, continental rationalism, and British evangelicalism, along with a variety of pietistic movements.
Calvinism came to Ghana by way of Protestantism, German Pietism, and the Basel Mission in 1828.
This book makes a tremendous contribution to filling in part of this gap, chronicling the streams and eddies of German Pietism with special focus on 1670-1727.
5) Although he later severed his connection with the student revival as a movement and came to have critical reservations about Pietism, his involvement with it left lasting effects, such as the centrality of the Bible in his understanding of theology and in his university lectures in the 1920s.
I worried how pietism and pride can bend logic for its own purposes.
He then looks more closely at the work of the Jesuits, the rise of Pietism, the Anglican and Protestant effort centred in Britain, and finally the effect of these efforts on the people and societies being evangelised (a fascinating section).
While Beachy acknowledges some of the excesses associated with "keeping order'" he is more concerned about the influence of Protestant individualism as found in Pietism and evangelicalism.
This provides an original analysis of the gendering of religious language up to the advent of Pietism.
The rest is a mishmash of superstition, pietism, a sugary sentimentalism, a streak of Puritanism, and a bleak authoritarianism borrowed from Victorian England.