pietism


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Related to pietism: Methodism

pi·e·tism

 (pī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Stress on the emotional and personal aspects of religion.
2. Affected or exaggerated piety.
3. Pietism A reform movement in the German Lutheran Church during the 1600s and 1700s, which strove to renew the devotional ideal in the Protestant religion.

[German Pietismus, from Latin pietās, piety; see piety.]

pi′e·tist n.
pi′e·tis′tic adj.
pi′e·tis′ti·cal·ly adv.

pietism

(ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a less common word for piety
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) excessive, exaggerated, or affected piety or saintliness
ˈpietist n
ˌpieˈtistic, ˌpieˈtistical adj

Pietism

(ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzəm)
n
(Historical Terms) history a reform movement in the German Lutheran Churches during the 17th and 18th centuries that strove to renew the devotional ideal
ˈPietist n

Pi•e•tism

(ˈpaɪ ɪˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. a movement in the Lutheran Church in Germany in the 17th century that stressed personal piety over religious formality and orthodoxy.
2. (l.c.) intensity of religious devotion or feeling.
3. (l.c.) exaggeration or affectation of piety.
[1690–1700; < German Pietismus < Latin piet(ās) piety + German -ismus -ism]
Pi′e•tist, n.
pi`e•tis′tic, pi`e•tis′ti•cal, adj.
pi`e•tis′ti•cal•ly, adv.

Pietism

1. a movement, begun in the 17th-century German Lutheran Church, exalting the practice of personal piety over religious orthodoxy and ritual.
2. the principles and practices of the Pietists. Also called Spenerism. — Piëtist, n. — Pietistic, Pietistical, adj.
See also: Protestantism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pietism - 17th and 18th-century German movement in the Lutheran Church stressing personal piety and devotion
religious movement - a movement intended to bring about religious reforms
Deutschland, FRG, Germany, Federal Republic of Germany - a republic in central Europe; split into East Germany and West Germany after World War II and reunited in 1990
2.pietism - exaggerated or affected piety and religious zeal
devoutness, religiousness - piety by virtue of being devout

pietism

noun
A state of often extreme religious ardour:
Translations

pietism

[ˈpaɪətɪzəm] Npiedad f, devoción f (pej) → beatería f, mojigatería f

pietism

n
Pietismder Pietismus
(= piety)Pietät f, → Frömmigkeit f; (pej)Frömmelei f

pietism

[ˈpaɪɪˌtɪzm] npietismo
References in periodicals archive ?
The Halle Orphanage as Scientific Community: Observation, Eclecticism, and Pietism in the Early Enlightenment.
Have we, the silent, consenting majority, too indifferent to what's happening around us as long as 'it isn't me,' too timid to expose our signature on a statement of protest or to join a movement, too ensconced in the safe cocoon of pietism and parochial work or a gratifying charity, those with interests and connections to protect, too busy to 'share' or 'send' the flow of critical commentary from the internet, or just too comfortable to care-have we all become complicit?
Sefer a[cedilla][currency]asidim, the compendium of pietism and ethics that reflects Jewish life in Germany at this time, also acknowledges the role of shadkhanim.
Religion as an Agent of Change: Crusades -- Reformation -- Pietism
Pietism was a movement within Lutheranism that began in the late 17th century, reached its zenith in the mid-18th century, and declined through the 19th century, and had almost vanished in America by the end of the 20th century.
While there are conflicting views on the financial condition of Kant's family during his childhood and youth,2 the strong influence of Pietism and morality remain constant (the first being the religious faith of the family and the second his mother's influence).
An opponent of rationalist mainstream Lutheranism and influenced by Romanticism and Pietism, Lohe called for a renewal of the Christian faith, campaigning for pastoral sensitivity, liturgical renewal, and a global vision for Christianity.
Allan Aubrey Boesak and Curtiss Paul DeYoung, Radical Reconciliation: Beyond Political Pietism and Christian Quietism.
Douglas Shantz begins his new book with a list of seven people, and the fact that you see the names of two Reformed pastors and one Lutheran layman before you get to Philipp Jakob Spener's name, and that you meet two women before August Hermann Francke, and that the name of Nikolaus von Zinzendorf is not there at all suggests that things have changed since Ernest Stoeffier introduced German Pietism to English-speaking audiences in the 1960s and 1970s.
Calvinism came to Ghana by way of Protestantism, German Pietism, and the Basel Mission in 1828.
This book makes a tremendous contribution to filling in part of this gap, chronicling the streams and eddies of German Pietism with special focus on 1670-1727.
5) Although he later severed his connection with the student revival as a movement and came to have critical reservations about Pietism, his involvement with it left lasting effects, such as the centrality of the Bible in his understanding of theology and in his university lectures in the 1920s.