pietistic


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pi·e·tism

 (pī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Stress on the emotional and personal aspects of religion.
2. Affected or exaggerated piety.
3. Pietism A reform movement in the German Lutheran Church during the 1600s and 1700s, which strove to renew the devotional ideal in the Protestant religion.

[German Pietismus, from Latin pietās, piety; see piety.]

pi′e·tist n.
pi′e·tis′tic adj.
pi′e·tis′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pietistic - of or relating to Pietism; "the Pietistic movement"
2.pietistic - excessively or hypocritically pious; "a sickening sanctimonious smile"
pious - having or showing or expressing reverence for a deity; "pious readings"

pietistic

adjective
Deeply concerned with God and the beliefs and practice of religion:
Translations

pietistic

[paɪəˈtɪstɪk] ADJ (pej) → pietista, beato, mojigato

pietistic

adj (pej)frömmelnd
References in periodicals archive ?
The answer is not to be found in pietistic appeals to victims to avoid 'hate language' and divisive attributions.
He sets the bar on leadership for his brother bishops all over the world, one that is moral but not moralistic, spiritual but not pietistic," added David.
It is unfortunate that the Indian public is enamoured of more pietistic tendencies rather than living in the genuine world of spirituality.
German Baptists, a religious minority with pietistic sentiments and no direct ties to the state, although facing some limitations, were able to function under the Nazi regime.
But the sometimes edgy, occasionally nude, figures do not go over well in many pietistic church circles, who prefer a Jesus with a more beatific face and his mother without curves.
In the first half, Joshua Hendrick crafts a cautiously critical portrait of the formation and expansion of the Gulen movement, which morphed from Sufism and the Nurcu pietistic movement of Said Nursi.
In Judson's description, she "emphasized, simple, modest, and pietistic virtue, while avoiding the overtly emotional excesses of baroque ritual practice.
First, Western Christianity has been co-opted by powers and second, Western Christianity has linked Christian doctrines to pietistic understandings, which lead to privatization of all theological themes, like the cross and salvation.
First, he points out that during the time he spent studying in Baghdad, "al-Shafi'i encountered two contrary but immensely important trends in the legal thought of the late second/eighth centuries: the pietistic commitment to Prophetic hadith-reports as the primary evidence for Prophetic Practice and thus as the primary guide to personal religious practice, and the attempt to make the law rationally consistent by testing the interrelationship of rules by means of analogical reasoning and dialectics" (p.
What results is an engaging account of an American evangelical scholar's journey from childhood to mature adulthood, who along the way is rescued by Reformed theology from his pietistic childhood, is nurtured by outstanding teachers at Wheaton College and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, finds a professional home in Wheaton College's History Department, and lastly moves to the University of Notre Dame.
Thiessen's study of a particular class of Mennonites since the Second World War deepens our understanding of a group long associated with largely self-contained pietistic rural colonies, which embraced pacifism and detached themselves from the secular world.
Martha often retreats to her bedroom to read her mother's diaries that reveal a life lived in a vastly different world of patriarchal privilege and pietistic language.