pietistic


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pi·e·tism

 (pī′ĭ-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Stress on the emotional and personal aspects of religion.
2. Affected or exaggerated piety.
3. Pietism A reform movement in the German Lutheran Church during the 1600s and 1700s, which strove to renew the devotional ideal in the Protestant religion.

[German Pietismus, from Latin pietās, piety; see piety.]

pi′e·tist n.
pi′e·tis′tic adj.
pi′e·tis′ti·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pietistic - of or relating to Pietism; "the Pietistic movement"
2.pietistic - excessively or hypocritically pious; "a sickening sanctimonious smile"
pious - having or showing or expressing reverence for a deity; "pious readings"

pietistic

adjective
Deeply concerned with God and the beliefs and practice of religion:
Translations

pietistic

[paɪəˈtɪstɪk] ADJ (pej) → pietista, beato, mojigato

pietistic

adj (pej)frömmelnd
References in periodicals archive ?
What results is an engaging account of an American evangelical scholar's journey from childhood to mature adulthood, who along the way is rescued by Reformed theology from his pietistic childhood, is nurtured by outstanding teachers at Wheaton College and Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, finds a professional home in Wheaton College's History Department, and lastly moves to the University of Notre Dame.
Chapter five focuses largely on Akbar, his sixteenth-century attempt to amalgamate Islam with other faiths ranging from Hinduism and Buddhism to Christianity, Jainism, and Zoroastrianism, his curiosity about the occult and pietistic ordeals, and the problems that arise when rulers push the boundaries of imperial license.
Thiessen's study of a particular class of Mennonites since the Second World War deepens our understanding of a group long associated with largely self-contained pietistic rural colonies, which embraced pacifism and detached themselves from the secular world.
Martha often retreats to her bedroom to read her mother's diaries that reveal a life lived in a vastly different world of patriarchal privilege and pietistic language.
Three "ideal types" can be distilled from this history: (1) the religious sphere as the sole source of power and authority by which the legitimacy of the political sphere is measured ("theocratic tendency"); (2) the political sphere invested with absolute power, including control over the religious ("Caesaro-papist tendency"); (3) mutual distance, in which either the religious and political spheres are institutionally and legally separated ("secular tendency") or the religious withdraws entirely from the public space into an inner world ("ascetic / mystical / pietistic tendency") (23-24).
He finds them in the rationalism of Comenius's understanding of world, mind, and scripture as complementary sources of revelation, as well as in the apophatic qualities of Zinzendorf's pietistic theology, from which the author develops the principle of "modesty" as the foundation of his own theological project.
In her concluding chapter, observing that the appetite for Amish fiction is hardly blunted today, Weaver-Zercher explores possible future directions in which the genre may move, including a more critical treatment of the Amish, expansion of the genre to other pietistic denominations, increasing competition from secular publishers, and a shift toward Amish non-fiction such as memoirs.
He was also influenced by strands of Dutch pietism, continental rationalism, and British evangelicalism, along with a variety of pietistic movements.
Virginia) has uncovered considerable evidence for an influx of more pietistic and mystically oriented evangelical religion, mostly from within the Anglican ranks.
Within this first room the audience is immediately immersed in the pietistic climate of 17th-century Seville.
But he encouraged pietistic Sufism, even if his opposition to blind obedience to tradition forced him to favour independent reasoning.