piety


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Related to piety: pious

pi·e·ty

 (pī′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. pi·e·ties
1. The state or quality of being pious, especially:
a. Religious devotion and reverence.
b. Devotion and reverence to parents and family: filial piety.
2. A devout act, thought, or statement.
3.
a. A position held conventionally or hypocritically.
b. A statement of such a position: "the liberated pieties of people who believe that social attitudes have kept pace with women's aspirations" (Erica Abeel).

[Middle English piete, mercy, pity, from Old French, from Latin pietās, dutiful conduct, from pius, dutiful.]

piety

(ˈpaɪɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) dutiful devotion to God and observance of religious principles
2. the quality or characteristic of being pious
3. a pious action, saying, etc
4. rare devotion and obedience to parents or superiors
[C13 piete, from Old French, from Latin pietās piety, dutifulness, from pius pious]

pi•e•ty

(ˈpaɪ ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. reverence for God or devout fulfillment of religious obligations.
2. the quality or state of being pious.
3. dutiful respect or regard for parents, homeland, etc.: filial piety.
4. a pious act, remark, belief, or the like.
[1275–1325; Middle English piete < Middle French < Latin pietās=pi(us) + -etās, variant (after i) of -itās; see pious, -ity]
pity, piety - Pity and piety shared the meanings "compassion" and "dutifulness, reverence" for a while.
See also related terms for pity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piety - righteousness by virtue of being pious
righteousness - adhering to moral principles
devoutness, religiousness - piety by virtue of being devout
dutifulness - piety by virtue of devotion to duty
godliness - piety by virtue of being a godly person
impiety, impiousness - unrighteousness by virtue of lacking respect for a god

piety

noun holiness, duty, faith, religion, grace, devotion, reverence, sanctity, veneration, godliness, devoutness, dutifulness, piousness a woman later to be canonized for her piety

piety

noun
A state of often extreme religious ardour:
Translations
تَقْوى، وَرَع
zbožnost
fromhed
hurskauskunnioitustekopyhyys
áhitatájtatoskodásjámborságkegyességvallásosság
guîrækni
dindarlıksofuluk

piety

[ˈpaɪətɪ] Npiedad f, devoción f; (= affected piety) → beatería f

piety

[ˈpaɪɪti] npiété f

piety

n
Pietät f, → Frömmigkeit f; filial pietyRespekt mgegenüber den Eltern
pieties pl (pej)Frömmeleien pl (pej)

piety

[ˈpaɪətɪ] npietà, devozione f

pious

(ˈpaiəs) adjective
having or showing strong religious feelings, reverence for or devotion to God etc. a pious woman/attitude.
ˈpiously adverb
piety (ˈpaiəti) noun
References in classic literature ?
Horses turned loose Preparations for winter quarters Hungry times Nez Perces, their honesty, piety, pacific habits, religious ceremonies Captain Bonneville's conversations with them Their love of gambling
Wonder at such unaffected tenderness and piety, where it was least to have been sought, contended in all our bosoms with shame and confusion, at receiving such pure and wholesome instructions from creatures so far below us in the arts and comforts of life.
Atheism leaves a man to sense, to philosophy, to natural piety, to laws, to reputation; all which may be guides to an outward moral virtue, though religion were not; but superstition dismounts all these, and erecteth an absolute monarchy, in the minds of men.
He lived greatly respected for his piety, and not a little distinguished as a sectary; was intrusted by his associates with many important political stations; and died just in time to escape the knowledge of his own poverty.
Nor can piety itself, at such a shameful sight, completely stifle her upbraidings against the permitting stars.
Most of the soldiers and sailors were desirous of going with us, some from real principles of piety, and a desire of sharing the labours and merits of the mission, others upon motives very different, the hopes of raising a fortune.
Monsieur Isidore-Charles-Thomas Baudoyer, representing one of the oldest bourgeois families of Paris, and head of a bureau in the late Monsieur de la Billardiere's division, has lately recalled the old traditions of piety and devotion which formerly distinguished these great families, so jealous for the honor and glory of religion, and so faithful in preserving its monuments.
She felt sure that she would have accepted the judicious Hooker, if she had been born in time to save him from that wretched mistake he made in matrimony; or John Milton when his blindness had come on; or any of the other great men whose odd habits it would have been glorious piety to endure; but an amiable handsome baronet, who said "Exactly" to her remarks even when she expressed uncertainty,--how could he affect her as a lover?
It is said to have been drawn, several years before the present anti-slavery agitation began, by a north- ern Methodist preacher, who, while residing at the south, had an opportunity to see slaveholding mor- als, manners, and piety, with his own eyes.
Whether from diffidence or shame, or a touch of anger, or mere procrastination, or because (as we have seen) he had no skill in literary arts, or because (as I am sometimes tempted to suppose) there is a law in human nature that prevents young men - not otherwise beasts - from the performance of this simple act of piety - months and years had gone by, and John had never written.
They seem never to have thought of questioning either the morality or piety of war.
It is to the filial piety of Victor Lavalle that we owe the two volumes consecrated to the ground-life of his father, so full of the holy intimacies of the domestic hearth.