piggin

piggin

(ˈpɪɡɪn)
n
a small wooden bucket or tub. Also called: pipkin
[C16: origin unknown]
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I told him the dingey was nearly swamped, and he reached me a piggin.
I heard the bows ground in the sand, staved the dingey off the rudder of the big boat with my piggin, and freeing the painter, landed.
Partly to show the indispensableness of this act, it may here be stated, that, in the old Dutch fishery, a mop was used to dash the running line with water; in many other ships, a wooden piggin, or bailer, is set apart for that purpose.
D Whiteley, two-storey side extension and alterations, 1, Highbridge Lane, Skelmanthorpe | David Piggin, construction of single-storey front extensions, alterations to roof and alterations to external elevations, 4, Cliffe Street, Clayton West.
Michael Piggin was held indefinitely under the Mental Health Act in 2014 after an arsenal was found in his bedroom in Loughborough, England.
TEENAGER Michael Piggin, who kept a stash of weapons in his home but denied he was planning a repeat of the Columbine school massacre, has been detained under the Mental Health Act.
Corporate partner Ian Piggin led the Wragge Lawrence Graham & Co 12-strong multidiscipline team.
The second is a piggin string, which you can buy in most feed and ranch supply stores.
Prosecutors said Michael Piggin, 18, kept petrol bombs, air rifles, pistols and armour at his home to use against staff and pupils at his former high school in Loughborough, Leicestershire.
Writing of tensions in Australia, Stuart Piggin uses similar terms: "Pan-Anglicanism" and "Pan-Evangelicalism.
Indeed, they were wise to keep it in the family, otherwise, who outside this triangle would dare engage in a conversation that would be peppered with 'a lot of people don't know this, but', 'Believe it or not', and 'It is a little-known fact that, say, a piggin was an object that fitted tightly over the head of one's interlocutor when the subject of discourse came to useless facts'.
Situating the analysis in a more historical context, Stuart Piggin (1996) goes so far as to suggest that American influence on Australian evangelicalism has produced its finest moment.