ray

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ray 1

 (rā)
n.
1.
a. A narrow stream of radiant energy, especially visible light, traveling in a straight or nearly straight line.
b. A narrow stream of particles such as protons traveling in a straight or nearly straight line.
c. A rapidly moving particle traveling in a straight or nearly straight line.
d. rays Sunshine: Let's go to the beach and catch some rays.
2. A small amount; a trace: not a ray of hope left.
3. Mathematics A straight line extending from a point. Also called half-line.
4. A structure or part having the form of a straight line extending from a point, such as:
a. Any of the bright streaks that are seen radiating from some craters on the moon.
b. A ray flower or the strap-shaped portion of the corolla of a ray flower.
c. A branch of an umbel.
d. One of the bony spines supporting the membrane of a fish's fin.
e. One of the arms of a starfish or other radiate animal.
tr.v. rayed, ray·ing, rays
1. To send out as rays; emit.
2. To supply with rays or radiating lines.
3. To cast rays on; irradiate.

[Middle English rai, from Old French, from Latin radius, pointed stick, spoke, radius of a circle, ray of light (from the representation of rays of light as spearlike shafts ), of unknown origin.]

ray 2

 (rā)
n.
1. Any of various cartilaginous fishes of the superorder Batoidea, having ventral gill slits, enlarged pelvic fins that are fused to the sides of the head, and a flattened body, and including the stingrays, skates, and guitarfishes.
2. Any of various members of this superorder having a whiplike tail usually with a stinging spine, such as a stingray, considered in contrast to a guitarfish, sawfish, or skate.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman raie, from Latin raia; possibly akin to Dutch rog and Old English reohhe (both the Latin and the Germanic perhaps ultimately being borrowed from the same European substrate source).]

ray

(reɪ)
n
1. a narrow beam of light; gleam
2. a slight indication, esp of something anticipated or hoped for: a ray of solace.
3. (Mathematics) maths a straight line extending from a point
4. (General Physics) a thin beam of electromagnetic radiation or particles
5. (Zoology) any of the bony or cartilaginous spines of the fin of a fish that form the support for the soft part of the fin
6. (Zoology) any of the arms or branches of a starfish or other radiate animal
7. (Astronomy) astronomy any of a number of bright streaks that radiate from the youngest lunar craters, such as Tycho; they are composed of crater ejecta not yet darkened, and extend considerable distances
8. (Botany) botany any strand of tissue that runs radially through the vascular tissue of some higher plants. See medullary ray
vb
9. (of an object) to emit (light) in rays or (of light) to issue in the form of rays
10. (intr) (of lines, etc) to extend in rays or on radiating paths
11. (Art Terms) (tr) to adorn (an ornament, etc) with rays or radiating lines
[C14: from Old French rai, from Latin radius spoke, radius]

ray

(reɪ)
n
(Animals) any of various marine selachian fishes typically having a flattened body, greatly enlarged winglike pectoral fins, gills on the undersurface of the fins, and a long whiplike tail. They constitute the orders Torpediniformes (electric rays) and Rajiformes
[C14: from Old French raie, from Latin raia]

ray

(reɪ)
n
(Music, other) music (in tonic sol-fa) the second degree of any major scale; supertonic
[C14: see gamut]

Ray

(reɪ)
n
(Placename) Cape Ray a promontory in SW Newfoundland, Canada

Ray

(reɪ)
n
1. (Biography) John. 1627–1705, English naturalist. He originated natural botanical classification and the division of flowering plants into monocotyledons and dicotyledons
2. (Biography) Man, real name Emmanuel Rudnitsky. 1890–1976, US surrealist photographer
3. (Biography) Satyajit (ˈsætjədʒɪt). 1921–92, Indian film director, noted for his Apu trilogy (1955–59)

ray1

(reɪ)

n.
1. a narrow beam of light.
2. a slight manifestation: a ray of hope.
3. radiance.
4.
a. any of the lines or streams in which light appears to radiate from a luminous body.
b. the straight line normal to the wave front in the propagation of radiant energy.
c. a stream of particles all moving in the same straight line. Compare gamma ray, alpha ray.
5.
a. one of a system of straight lines emanating from a point.
b. the part of a straight line considered as originating at a point on the line and as extending in one direction from that point.
6. any of a system of parts radially arranged.
7.
a. one of the branches or arms of a starfish or other radiate animal.
b. one of the bony or cartilaginous rods in the fin of a fish.
8. Bot.
b. one of the branches of an umbel.
9. one of many long, bright streaks radiating from some large lunar craters.
v.i.
10. to emit rays.
11. to issue in rays.
v.t.
12. to send forth in rays.
13. to throw rays upon; irradiate.
14. to subject to the action of rays, as in radiotherapy.
Idioms:
get or grab some rays, Slang. to sunbathe.
[1300–50; Middle English raie, raye < Old French rai < Latin radius]

ray2

(reɪ)

n.
any of numerous elasmobranch fishes having a flattened body and greatly enlarged pectoral fins with the gills on the undersides.
[1275–1325; Middle English raye (< Old French rai) < Latin raia]

Ray

(reɪ)

n.
Man, 1890–1976, U.S. painter and photographer.

ray

(rā)
1. Physics A thin line or narrow beam of light or other radiation.
2. Mathematics A geometric figure consisting of the part of a line that is on one side of a point on the line.
3. Botany A narrow flower resembling a petal, such as one of those surrounding the disk-shaped flower cluster of a daisy or sunflower.

ray

  • shaft - A ray of light.
  • radiate - As an adjective, it means having rays or parts coming out of a center, from Latin radius, "ray, spoke."
  • radio wave - Travels like rays of light, so it takes its name from Latin radius, "spoke of a wheel; ray of light."
  • sol-fa - The sol-fa syllables are doh, ray, mi, fah, sol, lah, te—for the notes of the major musical scale.

Ray(s)

 an order or array of soldiers, 1470.
Examples: rays of chastity, 1634; of comfort, 1781; of divinity, 1674; of genius, 1856; of gold, 1729; of hope, 1838; of horsemen, 1542; of truth, 1732.

ray


Past participle: rayed
Gerund: raying

Imperative
ray
ray
Present
I ray
you ray
he/she/it rays
we ray
you ray
they ray
Preterite
I rayed
you rayed
he/she/it rayed
we rayed
you rayed
they rayed
Present Continuous
I am raying
you are raying
he/she/it is raying
we are raying
you are raying
they are raying
Present Perfect
I have rayed
you have rayed
he/she/it has rayed
we have rayed
you have rayed
they have rayed
Past Continuous
I was raying
you were raying
he/she/it was raying
we were raying
you were raying
they were raying
Past Perfect
I had rayed
you had rayed
he/she/it had rayed
we had rayed
you had rayed
they had rayed
Future
I will ray
you will ray
he/she/it will ray
we will ray
you will ray
they will ray
Future Perfect
I will have rayed
you will have rayed
he/she/it will have rayed
we will have rayed
you will have rayed
they will have rayed
Future Continuous
I will be raying
you will be raying
he/she/it will be raying
we will be raying
you will be raying
they will be raying
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been raying
you have been raying
he/she/it has been raying
we have been raying
you have been raying
they have been raying
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been raying
you will have been raying
he/she/it will have been raying
we will have been raying
you will have been raying
they will have been raying
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been raying
you had been raying
he/she/it had been raying
we had been raying
you had been raying
they had been raying
Conditional
I would ray
you would ray
he/she/it would ray
we would ray
you would ray
they would ray
Past Conditional
I would have rayed
you would have rayed
he/she/it would have rayed
we would have rayed
you would have rayed
they would have rayed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ray - a column of light (as from a beacon)ray - a column of light (as from a beacon)
heat ray - a ray that produces a thermal effect
high beam - the beam of a car's headlights that provides distant illumination
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
moon ray, moonbeam, moon-ray - a ray of moonlight
sunbeam, sunray - a ray of sunlight
laser beam - a beam of light generated by a laser
low beam - the beam of a car's headlights that provides illumination for a short distance
2.ray - a branch of an umbel or an umbelliform inflorescence
pedicel, pedicle - a small stalk bearing a single flower of an inflorescence; an ultimate division of a common peduncle
3.ray - (mathematics) a straight line extending from a point
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
vector - a straight line segment whose length is magnitude and whose orientation in space is direction
4.ray - a group of nearly parallel lines of electromagnetic radiation
cathode ray - a beam of electrons emitted by the cathode of an electrical discharge tube
electromagnetic radiation, electromagnetic wave, nonparticulate radiation - radiation consisting of waves of energy associated with electric and magnetic fields resulting from the acceleration of an electric charge
particle beam - a collimated flow of particles (atoms or electrons or molecules)
5.ray - the syllable naming the second (supertonic) note of any major scale in solmization
solfa syllable - one of the names for notes of a musical scale in solmization
6.ray - any of the stiff bony spines in the fin of a fish
spine - a sharp rigid animal process or appendage; as a porcupine quill or a ridge on a bone or a ray of a fish fin
fin - organ of locomotion and balance in fishes and some other aquatic animals
7.ray - cartilaginous fishes having horizontally flattened bodies and enlarged winglike pectoral fins with gills on the underside; most swim by moving the pectoral fins
elasmobranch, selachian - any of numerous fishes of the class Chondrichthyes characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton and placoid scales: sharks; rays; skates
crampfish, electric ray, numbfish, torpedo - any sluggish bottom-dwelling ray of the order Torpediniformes having a rounded body and electric organs on each side of the head capable of emitting strong electric discharges
sawfish - primitive ray with sharp teeth on each edge of a long flattened snout
guitarfish - primitive tropical bottom-dwelling ray with a guitar-shaped body
stingray - large venomous ray with large barbed spines near the base of a thin whiplike tail capable of inflicting severe wounds
eagle ray - powerful free-swimming tropical ray noted for `soaring' by flapping winglike fins; usually harmless but has venomous tissue near base of the tail as in stingrays
manta ray, manta, devilfish - extremely large pelagic tropical ray that feeds on plankton and small fishes; usually harmless but its size make it dangerous if harpooned
skate - large edible rays having a long snout and thick tail with pectoral fins continuous with the head; swim by undulating the edges of the pectoral fins
Verb1.ray - emit as rays; "That tower rays a laser beam for miles across the sky"
give out, emit, give off - give off, send forth, or discharge; as of light, heat, or radiation, vapor, etc.; "The ozone layer blocks some harmful rays which the sun emits"
2.ray - extend or spread outward from a center or focus or inward towards a center; "spokes radiate from the hub of the wheel"; "This plants radiate spines in all directions"
extend, run, lead, pass, go - stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point; "Service runs all the way to Cranbury"; "His knowledge doesn't go very far"; "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life"; "The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets"
3.ray - expose to radiation; "irradiate food"
bombard - direct high energy particles or radiation against
process, treat - subject to a process or treatment, with the aim of readying for some purpose, improving, or remedying a condition; "process cheese"; "process hair"; "treat the water so it can be drunk"; "treat the lawn with chemicals" ; "treat an oil spill"

ray

noun
1. beam, bar, flash, shaft, gleam, flicker, glint, glimmer The first rays of light spread over the horizon.
2. trace, spark, flicker, glimmer, hint, indication, scintilla I can offer you a slender ray of hope.

ray

noun
A series of particles or waves traveling close together in parallel paths:
Translations
بَصيص، مِقْدار قَليلشُعاع
paprsekpolopřímkazásvit
glimtstråle
rajo
rahtunenrauskusäde
polupravaczračitizrakzraka
rájasugár
sinar
geislivonarglæta
starsrajastariņšstarojums
płaszczkapromień
rază
žarek
rockastråle
ışığıışık demetiışın

ray

1 [reɪ] N
1. [of light, heat, sun] → rayo m
see also X-ray
2. (fig) (= trace) a ray of hopeun rayo de esperanza

ray

2 [reɪ] N (= fish) → raya f
see also stingray

ray

3 [reɪ] N (Mus) → re m

ray

[ˈreɪ] n
[light] → rayon m
a ray of light → un rayon de lumière
the sun's rays → les rayons du soleil
ultraviolet rays → rayons ultraviolets
gamma rays → rayons gamma
[hope, comfort, goodness] → lueur f
a ray of hope → une lueur f d'espoir

ray

1
n
Strahl m; a ray of hopeein Hoffnungsschimmer or -strahl m; a ray of sunshine (fig)ein kleiner Trost
(of fish)Flossenstrahl m; (of starfish)Arm m

ray

2
n (= fish)Rochen m

ray

1 [reɪ] n
a.raggio; (of hope) → barlume m, raggio
a ray of comfort → un po' di conforto
b. (Geom) → semiretta

ray

2 [reɪ] n (fish) → razza

ray

(rei) noun
1. a narrow beam (of light, heat etc). the sun's rays; X-rays; heat-rays; a ray of light.
2. a slight amount (of hope etc).

ray

n. rayo.

ray

n rayo; the sun’s rays..los rayos solares..los rayos del sol