pigmented

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pig·ment

 (pĭg′mənt)
n.
1. A substance used as coloring.
2. Dry coloring matter, usually an insoluble powder, to be mixed with water, oil, or another base to produce paint and similar products.
3. A substance, such as chlorophyll or melanin, that produces a characteristic color in plant or animal tissue.
tr.v. pig·ment·ed, pig·ment·ing, pig·ments
To color with pigment.

[Middle English, spice, red dye, from Latin pigmentum, from pingere, to paint; see peig- in Indo-European roots.]

pig′men·tar′y (pĭg′mən-tĕr′ē) adj.

pigmented

(pɪɡˈmɛntɪd)
adj
(Biology) biology (in plants, animals, or man) coloured by the presence of pigments
Translations

pigmented

[pɪgˈmentɪd] ADJpigmentado

pigmented

adj pigmentado
References in periodicals archive ?
3,7) To our knowledge, any relationship between pigmented villonodular synovitis and LA has not been reported, although both are proliferative pathologies of the synovium.
The histologic examination revealed sheets of proliferating cells creating fronds protruding the synovial lining, which is compatible with pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) (Fig.
Pigmented villonodular synovitis is a benign proliferative synovial process that is most commonly monoarticular.
Pigmented villonodular synovitis usually affects large areas of the synovial surface.
Key Words: hemarthrosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, synovectomy
A review of the literature and careful analysis of the clinicopathologic features of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint reveal that the vast majority of reported cases were of the extra-articular variant of this disease, which is associated with more aggressive local infiltrative behavior and a higher rate of local recurrence than is the localized type.
Subcutaneous pigmented villonodular synovitis caused by portal contamination during knee arthroscopy and open synovectomy.
Strong to moderate p63 staining was seen in 80% of giant cell tumors of bone (Figure 1, A and B), 70% of chondroblastomas (Figure 2, A and B), 2 cases of aneurysmal bone cyst (Figure 2, C and D), 2 cases of giant cell reparative granulomas, 1 case of tenosynovial giant cell tumor, 2 cases of osteosarcoma (Figure 2, E and F), and 1 case of pigmented villonodular synovitis.
Molecular pathways involved in synovial cell inflammation and tumoral proliferation in diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis.
Case report 348: pigmented villonodular synovitis arising from bursa of the pes anserinus muscle, with secondary involvement of the tibia.
According to the article by Church et al, which of the following statements regarding pigmented villonodular synovitis is false?
Pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS), synovial chondromatosis, RA, intraarticular lipoma, and synovial hemangiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of LA as they usually present with painless synovial thickening and effusion.