pike


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pike 1

 (pīk)
n.
A long spear formerly used by infantry.
tr.v. piked, pik·ing, pikes
To attack or pierce with a pike.

[French pique, from Old French, from piquer, to prick; see pique.]

piked adj.

pike 2

 (pīk)
n. pl. pike or pikes
1. A freshwater game and food fish (Esox lucius) of the Northern Hemisphere that has a long snout and attains a length of over 1.2 meters (4 feet). Also called northern pike.
2. Any of various fishes closely related to this fish, such as the muskellunge or the pickerels.
3. Any of various fishes that resemble this fish.

[Middle English, perhaps from Old English pīc, sharp point (from its shape).]

pike 3

 (pīk)
n.
1. A turnpike.
2. Archaic
a. A tollgate on a turnpike.
b. A toll paid.
intr.v. piked, pik·ing, pikes
To move quickly.
Idiom:
come down the pike Slang
To come into prominence: "a policy ... allowing for little flexibility if an important new singer comes down the pike" (Christian Science Monitor).

[Short for turnpike.]

pike 4

 (pīk)
n. Chiefly British
A hill with a pointed summit.

[Middle English, possibly of Scandinavian origin.]

pike 5

 (pīk)
n.
A spike or sharp point, as on the tip of a spear.

[Middle English, from Old English pīc.]

pike 6

 (pīk)
n.
A mid-air position in sports such as diving and gymnastics in which the athlete bends to touch the feet or grab the calves or back of the thighs while keeping the legs together and straight.

[Probably from pike (from the resemblance of the position to the fish's head ).]

pike

(paɪk)
n, pl pike or pikes
1. (Animals) any of several large predatory freshwater teleost fishes of the genus Esox, esp E. lucius (northern pike), having a broad flat snout, strong teeth, and an elongated body covered with small scales: family Esocidae
2. (Animals) any of various similar fishes
[C14: short for pikefish, from Old English pīc point, with reference to the shape of its jaw]

pike

(paɪk)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a medieval weapon consisting of an iron or steel spearhead joined to a long pole, the pikestaff
2. a point or spike
vb
(tr) to stab or pierce using a pike
[Old English pīc point, of obscure origin]

pike

(paɪk)
n
(Civil Engineering) short for turnpike1

pike

(paɪk)
n
(Physical Geography) dialect Northern English a pointed or conical hill
[Old English pīc, of obscure origin]

pike

(paɪk) or

piked

adj
(Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) (of the body position of a diver) bent at the hips but with the legs straight
[C20: of obscure origin]

pike1

(paɪk)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) pike, (esp. for kinds or species) pikes.
1. any of several large, slender, voracious freshwater fishes of the genus Esox, having a long, flat snout.
2. any of various superficially similar fishes, as the walleye or pikeperch.
[1275–1325; Middle English; so called from its pointed snout (see pike5)]

pike2

(paɪk)

n., v. piked, pik•ing. n.
1. a shafted weapon having a pointed head, formerly used by infantry.
v.t.
2. to pierce, wound, or kill with a pike.
[1505–15; < Middle French pique, feminine variant of pic pick2< Germanic. See pike5, pique1]

pike3

(paɪk)

n.
1. a toll road or highway; turnpike.
2. a tollgate.
3. the toll paid at a tollgate.
[1820–30, Amer.; short for turnpike]

pike5

(paɪk)

n.
1. a sharply pointed projection or spike.
2. the pointed end of anything, as of an arrow or a spear.
[before 900; Middle English pik pick, spike, (pilgrim's) staff, Old English pīc pointed tool. See pick2]

pike7

(paɪk)
n.
a midair position assumed by divers and gymnasts in which the torso and head are bent forward and the legs held together with knees straight.
[1955–60; perhaps identical with pike1]

Pike

(paɪk)

n.
Zebulon Montgomery, 1779–1813, U.S. general and explorer.

pike


Past participle: piked
Gerund: piking

Imperative
pike
pike
Present
I pike
you pike
he/she/it pikes
we pike
you pike
they pike
Preterite
I piked
you piked
he/she/it piked
we piked
you piked
they piked
Present Continuous
I am piking
you are piking
he/she/it is piking
we are piking
you are piking
they are piking
Present Perfect
I have piked
you have piked
he/she/it has piked
we have piked
you have piked
they have piked
Past Continuous
I was piking
you were piking
he/she/it was piking
we were piking
you were piking
they were piking
Past Perfect
I had piked
you had piked
he/she/it had piked
we had piked
you had piked
they had piked
Future
I will pike
you will pike
he/she/it will pike
we will pike
you will pike
they will pike
Future Perfect
I will have piked
you will have piked
he/she/it will have piked
we will have piked
you will have piked
they will have piked
Future Continuous
I will be piking
you will be piking
he/she/it will be piking
we will be piking
you will be piking
they will be piking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been piking
you have been piking
he/she/it has been piking
we have been piking
you have been piking
they have been piking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been piking
you will have been piking
he/she/it will have been piking
we will have been piking
you will have been piking
they will have been piking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been piking
you had been piking
he/she/it had been piking
we had been piking
you had been piking
they had been piking
Conditional
I would pike
you would pike
he/she/it would pike
we would pike
you would pike
they would pike
Past Conditional
I would have piked
you would have piked
he/she/it would have piked
we would have piked
you would have piked
they would have piked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pike - a broad highway designed for high-speed trafficpike - a broad highway designed for high-speed traffic
autobahn - an expressway in a German-speaking country
autostrada - an expressway in an Italian-speaking country
carriageway - one of the two sides of a motorway where traffic travels in one direction only usually in two or three lanes
highway, main road - a major road for any form of motor transport
toll road, turnpike - an expressway on which tolls are collected
2.pike - highly valued northern freshwater fish with lean flesh
pike - any of several elongate long-snouted freshwater game and food fishes widely distributed in cooler parts of the northern hemisphere
freshwater fish - flesh of fish from fresh water used as food
muskellunge - flesh of very large North American pike; a game fish
pickerel - flesh of young or small pike
3.pike - a sharp point (as on the end of a spear)
point - sharp end; "he stuck the point of the knife into a tree"; "he broke the point of his pencil"
4.pike - medieval weapon consisting of a spearhead attached to a long pole or pikestaff; superseded by the bayonet
halberd - a pike fitted with an ax head
partizan, partisan - a pike with a long tapering double-edged blade with lateral projections; 16th and 17th centuries
pikestaff - the staff of a pike
spearpoint, spear-point, spearhead - the head and sharpened point of a spear
vouge - a kind of pike used by foot soldiers in the 14th century
weapon, weapon system, arm - any instrument or instrumentality used in fighting or hunting; "he was licensed to carry a weapon"
5.pike - any of several elongate long-snouted freshwater game and food fishes widely distributed in cooler parts of the northern hemisphere
percoid, percoid fish, percoidean - any of numerous spiny-finned fishes of the order Perciformes
Esox, genus Esox - type and only genus of the family Esocidae
Esox lucius, northern pike - voracious piscivorous pike of waters of northern hemisphere
Esox masquinongy, muskellunge - large (60 to 80 pounds) sport fish of North America
pickerel - any of several North American species of small pike
pike - highly valued northern freshwater fish with lean flesh
Translations
سَمَك الكَرَكي، زُنْجور
щука
štikapíka
geddepike
haug
haukipeitsi
štuka
csuka
gedda
lucius
lydeka
līdaka
ştiucă
šťuka
ščuka
štukaштука
gäddapik
turna balığı
щука

pike

1 [paɪk] N (Mil) → pica f

pike

2 [paɪk] N (pike or pikes (pl)) (= fish) → lucio m

pike

[ˈpaɪk] n
(= fish) → brochet m
(= weapon) → pique f
Some of them carried pikes with the heads of their victims on top → Certains d'entre eux portaient les têtes de leurs victimes au bout d'une pique.
(US) to come down the pike → se présenter

pike

1
n (= weapon)Pike f, → Spieß m

pike

2
n (= fish)Hecht m

pike

3
n (US inf: = toll-road) → Mautstraße f; (= barrier)Mautschranke f

pike

1 [paɪk] n (fish) → luccio

pike

2 [paɪk] n (spear) → picca

pike

(paik) plural pike noun
a large fierce fresh-water fish.
References in classic literature ?
They had come to Winesburg from some place in the South and ran a cider mill on the Trunion Pike.
Oh, my name it is Johnny from Pike, I'm h-ll on a spree or a strike" .
Now, der's two roads to de river,--de dirt road and der pike,--which Mas'r mean to take?
My folks was living in Pike County, in Missouri, where I was born, and they all died off but me and pa and my brother Ike.
The chub and the dace and the carp, not to speak of that Chinese pirate the pike, might still look to it, when I came forth armed with rod and line; but for me and my house the trout is henceforth sacred.
He would make them lock him into a courtyard to which they brought a warrior--usually, a man condemned to death-- armed with a long pike and broadsword.
The cock flung himself in after the fish and took the shape of a pike, and for two hours they chased each other up and down under the water, uttering horrible cries, but we could see nothing.
As soon as they come to a place they think convenient to halt at, the officer that commands the vanguard marks out with his pike the place for the King's or viceroy's tent: every one knows his rank, and how much ground he shall take up; so the camp is formed in an instant.
Don Quixote, however, who, as has been said, felt himself relieved and well, was eager to take his departure at once in quest of adventures, as it seemed to him that all the time he loitered there was a fraud upon the world and those in it who stood in need of his help and protection, all the more when he had the security and confidence his balsam afforded him; and so, urged by this impulse, he saddled Rocinante himself and put the pack-saddle on his squire's beast, whom likewise he helped to dress and mount the ass; after which he mounted his horse and turning to a corner of the inn he laid hold of a pike that stood there, to serve him by way of a lance.
After an early breakfast at Morristown, the tobacco pedlar, whose name was Dominicus Pike, had travelled seven miles through a solitary piece of woods, without speaking a word to anybody but himself and his little gray mare.
We'll know before the day is out whether we have caught our big, leanjawed pike, or whether he has got through the meshes.
The man crossed his pike before the minister; but the latter, robust and active, and hurried away, too, by his passion, wrested the pike from the soldier and struck him a violent blow on the shoulder with it.