pike

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Related to pikes: Pikes Peak, piles

pike 1

 (pīk)
n.
A long spear formerly used by infantry.
tr.v. piked, pik·ing, pikes
To attack or pierce with a pike.

[French pique, from Old French, from piquer, to prick; see pique.]

piked adj.

pike 2

 (pīk)
n. pl. pike or pikes
1. A freshwater game and food fish (Esox lucius) of the Northern Hemisphere that has a long snout and attains a length of over 1.2 meters (4 feet). Also called northern pike.
2. Any of various fishes closely related to this fish, such as the muskellunge or the pickerels.
3. Any of various fishes that resemble this fish.

[Middle English, perhaps from Old English pīc, sharp point (from its shape).]

pike 3

 (pīk)
n.
1. A turnpike.
2. Archaic
a. A tollgate on a turnpike.
b. A toll paid.
intr.v. piked, pik·ing, pikes
To move quickly.
Idiom:
come down the pike Slang
To come into prominence: "a policy ... allowing for little flexibility if an important new singer comes down the pike" (Christian Science Monitor).

[Short for turnpike.]

pike 4

 (pīk)
n. Chiefly British
A hill with a pointed summit.

[Middle English, possibly of Scandinavian origin.]

pike 5

 (pīk)
n.
A spike or sharp point, as on the tip of a spear.

[Middle English, from Old English pīc.]

pike 6

 (pīk)
n.
A mid-air position in sports such as diving and gymnastics in which the athlete bends to touch the feet or grab the calves or back of the thighs while keeping the legs together and straight.

[Probably from pike (from the resemblance of the position to the fish's head ).]

pike

(paɪk)
n, pl pike or pikes
1. (Animals) any of several large predatory freshwater teleost fishes of the genus Esox, esp E. lucius (northern pike), having a broad flat snout, strong teeth, and an elongated body covered with small scales: family Esocidae
2. (Animals) any of various similar fishes
[C14: short for pikefish, from Old English pīc point, with reference to the shape of its jaw]

pike

(paɪk)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) a medieval weapon consisting of an iron or steel spearhead joined to a long pole, the pikestaff
2. a point or spike
vb
(tr) to stab or pierce using a pike
[Old English pīc point, of obscure origin]

pike

(paɪk)
n
(Civil Engineering) short for turnpike1

pike

(paɪk)
n
(Physical Geography) dialect Northern English a pointed or conical hill
[Old English pīc, of obscure origin]

pike

(paɪk) or

piked

adj
(Swimming, Water Sports & Surfing) (of the body position of a diver) bent at the hips but with the legs straight
[C20: of obscure origin]

pike1

(paɪk)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) pike, (esp. for kinds or species) pikes.
1. any of several large, slender, voracious freshwater fishes of the genus Esox, having a long, flat snout.
2. any of various superficially similar fishes, as the walleye or pikeperch.
[1275–1325; Middle English; so called from its pointed snout (see pike5)]

pike2

(paɪk)

n., v. piked, pik•ing. n.
1. a shafted weapon having a pointed head, formerly used by infantry.
v.t.
2. to pierce, wound, or kill with a pike.
[1505–15; < Middle French pique, feminine variant of pic pick2< Germanic. See pike5, pique1]

pike3

(paɪk)

n.
1. a toll road or highway; turnpike.
2. a tollgate.
3. the toll paid at a tollgate.
[1820–30, Amer.; short for turnpike]

pike5

(paɪk)

n.
1. a sharply pointed projection or spike.
2. the pointed end of anything, as of an arrow or a spear.
[before 900; Middle English pik pick, spike, (pilgrim's) staff, Old English pīc pointed tool. See pick2]

pike7

(paɪk)
n.
a midair position assumed by divers and gymnasts in which the torso and head are bent forward and the legs held together with knees straight.
[1955–60; perhaps identical with pike1]

Pike

(paɪk)

n.
Zebulon Montgomery, 1779–1813, U.S. general and explorer.

pike


Past participle: piked
Gerund: piking

Imperative
pike
pike
Present
I pike
you pike
he/she/it pikes
we pike
you pike
they pike
Preterite
I piked
you piked
he/she/it piked
we piked
you piked
they piked
Present Continuous
I am piking
you are piking
he/she/it is piking
we are piking
you are piking
they are piking
Present Perfect
I have piked
you have piked
he/she/it has piked
we have piked
you have piked
they have piked
Past Continuous
I was piking
you were piking
he/she/it was piking
we were piking
you were piking
they were piking
Past Perfect
I had piked
you had piked
he/she/it had piked
we had piked
you had piked
they had piked
Future
I will pike
you will pike
he/she/it will pike
we will pike
you will pike
they will pike
Future Perfect
I will have piked
you will have piked
he/she/it will have piked
we will have piked
you will have piked
they will have piked
Future Continuous
I will be piking
you will be piking
he/she/it will be piking
we will be piking
you will be piking
they will be piking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been piking
you have been piking
he/she/it has been piking
we have been piking
you have been piking
they have been piking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been piking
you will have been piking
he/she/it will have been piking
we will have been piking
you will have been piking
they will have been piking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been piking
you had been piking
he/she/it had been piking
we had been piking
you had been piking
they had been piking
Conditional
I would pike
you would pike
he/she/it would pike
we would pike
you would pike
they would pike
Past Conditional
I would have piked
you would have piked
he/she/it would have piked
we would have piked
you would have piked
they would have piked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pike - a broad highway designed for high-speed trafficpike - a broad highway designed for high-speed traffic
autobahn - an expressway in a German-speaking country
autostrada - an expressway in an Italian-speaking country
carriageway - one of the two sides of a motorway where traffic travels in one direction only usually in two or three lanes
highway, main road - a major road for any form of motor transport
toll road, turnpike - an expressway on which tolls are collected
2.pike - highly valued northern freshwater fish with lean flesh
pike - any of several elongate long-snouted freshwater game and food fishes widely distributed in cooler parts of the northern hemisphere
freshwater fish - flesh of fish from fresh water used as food
muskellunge - flesh of very large North American pike; a game fish
pickerel - flesh of young or small pike
3.pike - a sharp point (as on the end of a spear)
point - sharp end; "he stuck the point of the knife into a tree"; "he broke the point of his pencil"
4.pike - medieval weapon consisting of a spearhead attached to a long pole or pikestaff; superseded by the bayonet
halberd - a pike fitted with an ax head
partizan, partisan - a pike with a long tapering double-edged blade with lateral projections; 16th and 17th centuries
pikestaff - the staff of a pike
spearpoint, spear-point, spearhead - the head and sharpened point of a spear
vouge - a kind of pike used by foot soldiers in the 14th century
weapon, weapon system, arm - any instrument or instrumentality used in fighting or hunting; "he was licensed to carry a weapon"
5.pike - any of several elongate long-snouted freshwater game and food fishes widely distributed in cooler parts of the northern hemisphere
percoid, percoid fish, percoidean - any of numerous spiny-finned fishes of the order Perciformes
Esox, genus Esox - type and only genus of the family Esocidae
Esox lucius, northern pike - voracious piscivorous pike of waters of northern hemisphere
Esox masquinongy, muskellunge - large (60 to 80 pounds) sport fish of North America
pickerel - any of several North American species of small pike
pike - highly valued northern freshwater fish with lean flesh
Translations
سَمَك الكَرَكي، زُنْجور
щука
štikapíka
geddepike
haug
haukipeitsi
štuka
csuka
gedda
lucius
lydeka
līdaka
ştiucă
šťuka
ščuka
štukaштука
gäddapik
turna balığı
щука

pike

1 [paɪk] N (Mil) → pica f

pike

2 [paɪk] N (pike or pikes (pl)) (= fish) → lucio m

pike

[ˈpaɪk] n
(= fish) → brochet m
(= weapon) → pique f
Some of them carried pikes with the heads of their victims on top → Certains d'entre eux portaient les têtes de leurs victimes au bout d'une pique.
(US) to come down the pike → se présenter

pike

1
n (= weapon)Pike f, → Spieß m

pike

2
n (= fish)Hecht m

pike

3
n (US inf: = toll-road) → Mautstraße f; (= barrier)Mautschranke f

pike

1 [paɪk] n (fish) → luccio

pike

2 [paɪk] n (spear) → picca

pike

(paik) plural pike noun
a large fierce fresh-water fish.
References in classic literature ?
Who gave them out, whence they last came, where they began, through what agency they crookedly quivered and jerked, scores at a time, over the heads of the crowd, like a kind of lightning, no eye in the throng could have told; but, muskets were being distributed--so were cartridges, powder, and ball, bars of iron and wood, knives, axes, pikes, every weapon that distracted ingenuity could discover or devise.
The tramp of horses was now heard, and the Lady Rowena appeared, surrounded by several riders, and a much stronger party of footmen, who joyfully shook their pikes and clashed their brown-bills for joy of her freedom.
Well, if I speak back, pikes will be going in two shakes; if I don't, Silver will see there's something under that, and the game's up.
But the colonel ordered six of the ringleaders to be seized, and thought no punishment so proper as to deliver them bound into my hands; which some of his soldiers accordingly did, pushing them forward with the butt-ends of their pikes into my reach.
And although a complete proof of this latter cannot be shown, nevertheless there was some evidence of it at the battle of Ravenna, when the Spanish infantry were confronted by German battalions, who follow the same tactics as the Swiss; when the Spaniards, by agility of body and with the aid of their shields, got in under the pikes of the Germans and stood out of danger, able to attack, while the Germans stood helpless, and, if the cavalry had not dashed up, all would have been over with them.
The tumult now began to increase; the street was not able to contain the spectators who assembled from every direction; the crowd invaded the space which the dreaded pikes of the guards had till then kept clear between them and the carriage.
Pikes which, perhaps, had been handled by Miles Standish's soldiers, now made their appearance again.
The two sides fought with their double-pointed spears in hand-to-hand encounter-the Trojans from their chariots, and the Achaeans climbing up into their ships and wielding the long pikes that were lying on the decks ready for use in a sea-fight, jointed and shod with bronze.
But they are such only when they seek to gratify the passion of revenge upon their enemies; and I ask whether the mere eating of human flesh so very far exceeds in barbarity that custom which only a few years since was practised in enlightened England:--a convicted traitor, perhaps a man found guilty of honesty, patriotism, and suchlike heinous crimes, had his head lopped off with a huge axe, his bowels dragged cut and thrown into a fire; while his body, carved into four quarters, was with his head exposed upon pikes, and permitted to rot and fester among the public haunts of men!
So Jerry and me pikes off, and once more we prepares to settle down around the board.
There were, moreover, Gothic letters, Hebrew letters, Greek letters, and Roman letters, pell-mell; the inscriptions overflowed at haphazard, on top of each other, the more recent effacing the more ancient, and all entangled with each other, like the branches in a thicket, like pikes in an affray.
So the King went out upon a balcony that overlooked the Great Cavern, where fifty thousand Nomes, all armed with swords and pikes, stood marshaled in military array.