pileated woodpecker

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pileated woodpecker

n.
A large North American woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) having black and white plumage and a bright red crest.

pi′leated wood′pecker


n.
a large, black-and-white North American woodpecker, Dryocopus pileatus, having a prominent red crest.
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Back on the path, three pileated woodpeckers, each a foot and a half tall, flash across the trail just a few yards away.
During the height of recent searches for the Ivory-billed Woodpecker (Campephilus principalis), this flight characteristic of large woodpeckers was sometimes hailed as characteristic of Ivory-billed Woodpeckers and a means to distinguish them from Pileated Woodpeckers (D.
Birding -- Bald eagles, numerous waterfowl and species such as pileated woodpeckers call Consumers Energy hydro property home.
Many people reside in Eugene because of the famed rivers that flow through it, the wildlands on the fringe of the city and the critters - such as pileated woodpeckers, great horned owls and cougars - that reside in the southern end of the Willamette Valley.
We also see turkeys, grouse, and Pileated woodpeckers.
You know," I said, "I've been thinking that we're going to see a lot more of the pileated woodpeckers.
For folks into birds (the kind you won't be eating later) now's prime time for buffleheads and mergansers, eagles, pileated woodpeckers, and if the weather holds, a flock of nearly 20 noisy parrots roosting in the trees on the east lip of the loop.
He enjoys seeing pileated woodpeckers outside his office window and quadrennially prognosticating about the summer Olympics using nothing more than economics.
Above Sam's head, almost out of the picture, is a cavity that had an active family of nesting pileated woodpeckers.
Those birds are almost certainly the more common and humanity-tolerant pileated woodpeckers, says refuge spokeswoman Connie Dickard, but she takes it as a good sign that the refuge's neighbors are interested.
Further, it is proposed that recent observations of pileated woodpecker (Dryocopus pileatus) destruction of red-cockaded woodpecker cavities may be related to the exclusion of fire, which has increased the number of snags and pileated woodpeckers.
A green tree and snag retention strategy focuses on protecting large snags that may be used by species such as Vaux's swift (Chaetura vauxi), pileated woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus), and myotis bats.