piles


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piles

 (pīlz)
pl.n.

[Middle English piles, from Medieval Latin pilī, from Latin pila, ball; see pellet.]

piles

(paɪlz)
pl n
(Pathology) a nontechnical name for haemorrhoids
[C15: from Latin pilae balls (referring to the appearance of external piles)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piles - pain caused by venous swelling at or inside the anal sphincterpiles - pain caused by venous swelling at or inside the anal sphincter
hurting, pain - a symptom of some physical hurt or disorder; "the patient developed severe pain and distension"
2.piles - a large number or amountpiles - a large number or amount; "made lots of new friends"; "she amassed stacks of newspapers"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude

piles

plural noun haemorrhoids More women than men suffer from piles.
Translations
hemoroidy
hæmorider
peräpukamat
hemoroidi
치질
hemorrojder
ริดสีดวงทวาร
bệnh trĩ

piles

[paɪlz] NPL (Med) → almorranas fpl, hemorroides fpl

piles

[ˈpaɪlz] npl (= haemorrhoids) → hémorroïdes fpl
to suffer from piles → avoir des hémorroïdespile-up pileup [ˈpaɪlʌp] (US) ncarambolage m
a 54-car pile-up → un carambolage impliquant 54 voitures

piles

plHämorr(ho)iden pl

piles

[paɪlz] npl (Med) → emorroidi fpl

piles

بَواسِير hemoroidy hæmorider Hämorrhoiden αιμορροΐδες almorranas peräpukamat hémorroïdes hemoroidi emorroidi 치질 aambeien hemorroider hemoroidy hemorróidas геморрой hemorrojder ริดสีดวงทวาร basur bệnh trĩ 痔疮

piles

n., pl. almorranas, hemorroides.

piles

npl (ant) hemorroides fpl, almorranas
References in classic literature ?
Beth was there, laying the snowy piles smoothly on the shelves and exulting over the goodly array.
I was tired of school, tired of winter clothes, of the rutted streets, of the dirty drifts and the piles of cinders that had lain in the yards so long.
Over these, nature hath formed passes, that are less difficult than might be expected from a view of such huge piles.
On all sides he beheld vast store of apples: some hanging in oppressive opulence on the trees; some gathered into baskets and barrels for the market; others heaped up in rich piles for the cider-press.
So, bit by bit, the feast takes form--there is a ham and a dish of sauerkraut, boiled rice, macaroni, bologna sausages, great piles of penny buns, bowls of milk, and foaming pitchers of beer.
There were little coats of many a form and pattern, piles of aprons, and rows of small stockings; and even a pair of little shoes, worn and rubbed at the toes, were peeping from the folds of a paper.
There were piles of crutches there which had been left by such people as a testimony.
There was sheds made out of poles and roofed over with branches, where they had lemonade and gingerbread to sell, and piles of watermelons and green corn and such-like truck.
Winter snows, I thought, had drifted through that void arch, winter rains beaten in at those hollow casements; for, amidst the drenched piles of rubbish, spring had cherished vegetation: grass and weed grew here and there between the stones and fallen rafters.
Over a spacious lawn, and behind a black plantation of firs, the rising sun rent its way upward through piles of ragged gray cloud; heavy drops of rain fell few and far between; the March wind shuddered round the corners of the house, and the wet trees swayed wearily.
There were pears and apples, clustered high in blooming pyramids; there were bunches of grapes, made, in the shopkeepers' benevolence to dangle from conspicuous hooks, that people's mouths might water gratis as they passed; there were piles of filberts, mossy and brown, recalling, in their fragrance, ancient walks among the woods, and pleasant shufflings ankle deep through withered leaves; there were Norfolk Biffins, squab and swarthy, setting off the yellow of the oranges and lemons, and, in the great compactness of their juicy persons, urgently entreating and beseeching to be carried home in paper bags and eaten after dinner.
Slimy gaps and causeways, winding among old wooden piles, with a sickly substance clinging to the latter, like green hair, and the rags of last year's handbills offering rewards for drowned men fluttering above high-water mark, led down through the ooze and slush to the ebb-tide.