pile

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pile 1

 (pīl)
n.
1. A quantity of objects stacked or thrown together in a heap. See Synonyms at heap.
2. Informal
a. A large accumulation or quantity: a pile of work to do.
b. A large amount of money: made a pile in the real estate boom.
3. A nuclear reactor.
4. A voltaic pile.
5. A very large building or complex of buildings.
6. A funeral pyre.
v. piled, pil·ing, piles
v.tr.
1.
a. To place or lay in a pile or heap: piled books onto the table.
b. To load (something) with a heap or pile: piled the table with books.
2. To add or increase to abundance or to a point of burdensomeness: piled homework on the students.
v.intr.
1. To form a heap or pile.
2. To move in, out, or forward in a disorderly mass or group: pile into a bus; pile out of a car.
Phrasal Verbs:
pile on
1. To leap onto an existing pile of people, especially football players.
2. To add or increase (something, such as criticism) abundantly or excessively.
pile up
1. To accumulate: Work is piling up.
2. Informal To undergo a serious vehicular collision.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pīla, pillar.]

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pile2

pile 2

 (pīl)
n.
1. A heavy post of timber, concrete, or steel, driven into the earth as a foundation or support for a structure.
2. Heraldry A wedge-shaped charge pointing downward.
3. A Roman javelin.
tr.v. piled, pil·ing, piles
1. To drive piles into.
2. To support with piles.

[Middle English, from Old English pīl, shaft, stake, from Latin pīlum, spear, pestle.]

pile 3

 (pīl)
n.
1.
a. Cut or uncut loops of yarn forming the surface of certain fabrics, such as velvet, plush, and carpeting.
b. The surface so formed.
2. Soft fine hair, fur, or wool.

[From Middle English piles(attested only in plural) downy hair, downy plumage, partly from Anglo-Norman peil, pil, hair, coat (as of a horse), cloth with a thick nap, and partly from Latin pilus, hair (Anglo-Norman, from Latin).]

piled adj.

pile

(paɪl)
n
1. a collection of objects laid on top of one another or of other material stacked vertically; heap; mound
2. informal a large amount of money (esp in the phrase make a pile)
3. (often plural) informal a large amount: a pile of work.
4. a less common word for pyre
5. a large building or group of buildings
6. (General Physics) short for voltaic pile
7. (General Physics) physics a structure of uranium and a moderator used for producing atomic energy; nuclear reactor
8. (Metallurgy) metallurgy an arrangement of wrought-iron bars that are to be heated and worked into a single bar
9. (Archery) the point of an arrow
vb
10. (often foll by up) to collect or be collected into or as if into a pile: snow piled up in the drive.
11. (intr; foll by in, into, off, out, etc) to move in a group, esp in a hurried or disorganized manner: to pile off the bus.
12. (Military) pile arms to prop a number of rifles together, muzzles together and upwards, butts forming the base
13. pile it on informal to exaggerate
[C15: via Old French from Latin pīla stone pier]

pile

(paɪl)
n
1. (Civil Engineering) a long column of timber, concrete, or steel that is driven into the ground to provide a foundation for a vertical load (a bearing pile) or a group of such columns to resist a horizontal load from earth or water pressure (a sheet pile)
2. (Heraldry) heraldry an ordinary shaped like a wedge, usually displayed point-downwards
vb (tr)
3. (Civil Engineering) to drive (piles) into the ground
4. (Civil Engineering) to provide or support (a structure) with piles
[Old English pīl, from Latin pīlum]

pile

(paɪl)
n
1. (Textiles) textiles
a. the yarns in a fabric that stand up or out from the weave, as in carpeting, velvet, flannel, etc
b. one of these yarns
2. (Textiles) soft fine hair, fur, wool, etc
[C15: from Anglo-Norman pyle, from Latin pilus hair]

pile1

(paɪl)

n., v. piled, pil•ing. n.
1. an assemblage of things laid or lying one upon the other: a pile of papers.
2. a large number, quantity, or amount of anything: a pile of work.
3. a heap of wood on which a dead body, a living person, or a sacrifice is burned; pyre.
4. a lofty or large building or group of buildings: the noble pile of Windsor Castle.
5. Informal. a large accumulation of money.
v.t.
8. to lay or dispose in a pile: to pile up leaves.
9. to accumulate or store (often fol. by up): to pile up money.
10. to cover or load with a pile.
v.i.
11. to accumulate, as money, debts, evidence, etc. (usu. fol. by up).
12. to move as a group in a more or less disorderly cluster.
13. to gather or rise in a pile (often fol. by up).
[1350–1400; < Middle French < Latin pīla pillar, mole of stone]

pile2

(paɪl)

n., v. piled, pil•ing. n.
1. a cylindrical or flat member of wood, steel, concrete, etc., hammered vertically into soil to form part of a foundation or retaining wall.
2. a triangular heraldic charge.
3. the sharp head or striking end of an arrow.
v.t.
4. to drive piles into.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English pīl shaft < Latin pīlum javelin]

pile3

(paɪl)

n.
1. a surface or thickness of soft hair, down, wool, or other pelage.
2. a soft or brushy surface on cloth, rugs, etc., formed by upright yarns that have been cut straight across or left standing in loops.
[1300–50; Middle English piles hair, plumage < Latin pilus hair]
piled, adj.

pile4

(paɪl)

n. Usu., piles.
[1375–1425; late Middle English pyles (pl.) < Latin pilae literally, balls. See pill1]

Pile

 a disordered heap of things; a large clump or collection of things; a heap of wood or faggots; a lofty mass of buildings.
Examples: pile of dead carcasses, 1656; of clothes, 1440; of clouds, 1812; of conjectures, 1835; of faggots, 1902; of islands; of justice, 1770; of letters and packages, 1891; of money, 1876; of shot; of stones; of trees, 1854; of wealth, 1613; of weapons, 1608; of wood, 1744.

heap

stackpile
1. 'heap'

A heap of things is usually untidy, and often has the shape of a hill or mound.

The building collapsed into a heap of rubble.
2. 'stack'

A stack is usually tidy, and often consists of flat objects placed directly on top of each other.

...a neat stack of dishes.
Eric came out of his room with a small stack of CDs in his hands.
3. 'pile'

A pile of things can be tidy or untidy.

...a neat pile of clothes.
He reached over to a pile of newspapers and magazines

pile


Past participle: piled
Gerund: piling

Imperative
pile
pile
Present
I pile
you pile
he/she/it piles
we pile
you pile
they pile
Preterite
I piled
you piled
he/she/it piled
we piled
you piled
they piled
Present Continuous
I am piling
you are piling
he/she/it is piling
we are piling
you are piling
they are piling
Present Perfect
I have piled
you have piled
he/she/it has piled
we have piled
you have piled
they have piled
Past Continuous
I was piling
you were piling
he/she/it was piling
we were piling
you were piling
they were piling
Past Perfect
I had piled
you had piled
he/she/it had piled
we had piled
you had piled
they had piled
Future
I will pile
you will pile
he/she/it will pile
we will pile
you will pile
they will pile
Future Perfect
I will have piled
you will have piled
he/she/it will have piled
we will have piled
you will have piled
they will have piled
Future Continuous
I will be piling
you will be piling
he/she/it will be piling
we will be piling
you will be piling
they will be piling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been piling
you have been piling
he/she/it has been piling
we have been piling
you have been piling
they have been piling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been piling
you will have been piling
he/she/it will have been piling
we will have been piling
you will have been piling
they will have been piling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been piling
you had been piling
he/she/it had been piling
we had been piling
you had been piling
they had been piling
Conditional
I would pile
you would pile
he/she/it would pile
we would pile
you would pile
they would pile
Past Conditional
I would have piled
you would have piled
he/she/it would have piled
we would have piled
you would have piled
they would have piled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pile - a collection of objects laid on top of each otherpile - a collection of objects laid on top of each other
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
compost heap, compost pile - a heap of manure and vegetation and other organic residues that are decaying to become compost
muckheap, muckhill, dunghill, midden - a heap of dung or refuse
scrapheap - pile of discarded metal
shock - a pile of sheaves of grain set on end in a field to dry; stalks of Indian corn set up in a field; "corn is bound in small sheaves and several sheaves are set up together in shocks"; "whole fields of wheat in shock"
slagheap - pile of waste matter from coal mining etc
stack - an orderly pile
funeral pyre, pyre - wood heaped for burning a dead body as a funeral rite
woodpile - a pile or stack of wood to be used for fuel
stockpile - a storage pile accumulated for future use
2.pile - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extentpile - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "see the rest of the winners in our huge passel of photos"; "it must have cost plenty"; "a slew of journalists"; "a wad of money"
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
deluge, flood, inundation, torrent - an overwhelming number or amount; "a flood of requests"; "a torrent of abuse"
haymow - a mass of hay piled up in a barn for preservation
3.pile - a large sum of money (especially as pay or profit)pile - a large sum of money (especially as pay or profit); "she made a bundle selling real estate"; "they sank megabucks into their new house"
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
money - wealth reckoned in terms of money; "all his money is in real estate"
4.pile - fine soft dense hair (as the fine short hair of cattle or deer or the wool of sheep or the undercoat of certain dogs)
hair - a covering for the body (or parts of it) consisting of a dense growth of threadlike structures (as on the human head); helps to prevent heat loss; "he combed his hair"; "each hair consists of layers of dead keratinized cells"
lanugo - the fine downy hair covering a human fetus; normally shed during the ninth month of gestation
5.pile - battery consisting of voltaic cells arranged in seriespile - battery consisting of voltaic cells arranged in series; the earliest electric battery devised by Volta
electric battery, battery - a device that produces electricity; may have several primary or secondary cells arranged in parallel or series
6.pile - a column of wood or steel or concrete that is driven into the ground to provide support for a structurepile - a column of wood or steel or concrete that is driven into the ground to provide support for a structure
pillar, column - (architecture) a tall vertical cylindrical structure standing upright and used to support a structure
sheath pile, sheet pile, sheet piling - a pile in a row of piles driven side by side to retain earth or prevent seepage
7.pile - the yarn (as in a rug or velvet or corduroy) that stands up from the weavepile - the yarn (as in a rug or velvet or corduroy) that stands up from the weave; "for uniform color and texture tailors cut velvet with the pile running the same direction"
thread, yarn - a fine cord of twisted fibers (of cotton or silk or wool or nylon etc.) used in sewing and weaving
8.pile - a nuclear reactor that uses controlled nuclear fission to generate energypile - a nuclear reactor that uses controlled nuclear fission to generate energy
nuclear reactor, reactor - (physics) any of several kinds of apparatus that maintain and control a nuclear reaction for the production of energy or artificial elements
Verb1.pile - arrange in stacks; "heap firewood around the fireplace"; "stack your books up on the shelves"
arrange, set up - put into a proper or systematic order; "arrange the books on the shelves in chronological order"
rick - pile in ricks; "rick hay"
cord - stack in cords; "cord firewood"
heap up, stack up, pile up - arrange into piles or stacks; "She piled up her books in my living room"
2.pile - press tightly together or crampile - press tightly together or cram; "The crowd packed the auditorium"
crowd together, crowd - to gather together in large numbers; "men in straw boaters and waxed mustaches crowded the verandah"
3.pile - place or lay as if in a pile; "The teacher piled work on the students until the parents protested"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"

pile

1
noun
2. (Informal) (often plural) lot(s), mountain(s), load(s) (informal), oceans, wealth, great deal, stack(s), abundance, large quantity, oodles (informal), shedload (Brit. informal) I've got piles of questions for you.
4. (Informal) fortune, bomb (Brit. slang), pot, packet (slang), mint, big money, wad (U.S. & Canad. slang), big bucks (informal, chiefly U.S.), top dollar (informal), megabucks (U.S. & Canad. slang), tidy sum (informal), pretty penny (informal) He made a pile in various business ventures.
verb
1. load, stuff, pack, stack, charge, heap, cram, lade He was piling clothes into the case.
2. crowd, pack, charge, rush, climb, flood, stream, crush, squeeze, jam, flock, shove They all piled into the car.
pile something up
1. collect, gather (up), assemble, stack (up), mass, heap (up), load up Bulldozers piled up huge mounds of dirt.
2. collect, accumulate, gather in, pull in, amass, hoard, stack up, store up, heap up Their aim is to pile up the points and aim for a qualifying place.
pile up accumulate, collect, gather (up), build up, amass Her mail had piled up inside the front door.

pile

2
noun foundation, support, post, column, piling, beam, upright, pier, pillar wooden houses set on piles along the shore

pile

3
noun nap, fibre, down, hair, surface, fur, plush, shag, filament the carpet's thick pile

pile

noun
1. A group of things gathered haphazardly:
2. Informal. A great deal:
Informal: barrel, heap, lot, pack, peck.
Regional: power, sight.
3. Slang. A large sum of money:
4. A usually permanent construction, such as a house or store:
verb
1. To put into a disordered pile.Also used with up:
2. To make or become full; put as much into as can be held:
3. To fill to overflowing:
4. To leave one's bed:
Informal: turn out.
phrasal verb
pile up
1. To bring together so as to increase in mass or number:
2. Informal. To undergo wrecking:
Informal: crack up.
Translations
ثَرْوَه، مِقْدار كَبير من المالرَكيزَه، عَمود، خازوقزَغَبكَوْمَةكَوْمَه، عُرْمَه
hromadakůlmořenaskládatstoh
bunkedyngeluvpælpille
pinokasa
gomila
halom
burîarstólpifloshrúgaógrynnistafla
積み重ね
퇴적물
čupakaudzekraut kaudzēpūkasuzkārsums
hromadanaukladať/dať na kopuvlas
kopičitikopičiti sekup
hög
กอง
yığınyığmakbir yığınbüyük kazıkhav
đống

pile

1 [paɪl]
A. N
1. (= heap) [of books, clothes] → montón m
to put things in a pileamontonar cosas, juntar cosas en un montón
the building was reduced to a pile of rubbleel edificio quedó reducido a un montón or una pila de escombros
2. (= large amount) → montón m
I've got piles of work to dotengo un montón or tengo montones de trabajo que hacer
3. (= fortune) → dineral m, fortuna f
he made a pile on this dealganó un dineral or una fortuna con el trato, se hizo de oro con el trato
he made his pile in oilhizo su fortuna con el petróleo
4. (= building) → mole f (hum)
some stately pile in the countryuna mole de casa or un caserón en el campo
5. (Phys) → pila f
see also atomic
B. VTamontonar, apilar
he piled the plates onto the trayamontonó or apiló los platos en la bandeja
we piled more coal on the fireechamos más carbón al fuego
the tables were piled high with fooden las mesas había montones or montañas de comida
her hair was piled high on her headllevaba el pelo recogido con un tocado alto
I piled the children into the carmetí a los niños apretujados en el coche
C. VI
1. (= squeeze)
we all piled into the carnos metimos todos apretujados en el coche
we piled off the bussalimos en avalancha or en tropel del autobús
they piled onto the busse metieron apretujados en el autobús
2. (= attack)
they piled into himse abalanzaron sobre él
3. (= crash)
his car piled into the treesu coche se estrelló contra el árbol
12 cars had piled into each other12 coches se habían estrellado en cadena
pile in VI + ADV
1. (= get in) pile in!¡súbanse como puedan!
2. (= intervene) → lanzarse al ataque
pile off VI + ADV [people] → salir en avalancha or en tropel
pile on
A. VI + ADV (= crowd on) → meterse a empujones, meterse apretujados
B. VT + ADV he piled on more branchesechó más ramas
they really pile the work on, don't they?te dan muchísimo trabajo, ¿verdad?
to pile on the agonymultiplicar el martirio
he does rather pile it ones un exagerado
they were piling it onestaban exagerando
see also pressure A2
pile out VI + ADV [people] → salir en avalancha or en tropel
pile up
A. VI + ADV
1. (= accumulate) [work] → amontonarse, acumularse
black clouds were piling up on the horizonel horizonte se estaba cargando or se llenaba de nubes negras
2. (= crash) [vehicle] → estrellarse, chocar; [vehicles] → estrellarse en cadena, chocar en cadena
B. VT + ADV
1. (= put in heap) [+ books, clothes] → apilar, amontonar
2. (= accumulate) [+ possessions] → acumular; [+ debts] → acumular, llenarse de

pile

2 [paɪl]
A. N (Constr) → pilote m, pilar m
B. CPD pile driver Nmartinete m
pile dwelling N (Hist) → vivienda f construida sobre pilotes

pile

3 [paɪl] N [of carpet, cloth] → pelo m
see also shag 4

pile

[ˈpaɪl]
n
(= neat stack) → pile f
in a neat pile → soigneusement empilés
The clothes were folded and in a neat pile → Les vêtements étaient pliés et soigneusement empilés.
to put sth in a pile → empiler qch
to be stacked in a pile → être empilé
The dirty plates had been stacked in a pile on the table → Les assiettes sales avaient été empilées sur la table.
to be at the bottom of the pile (fig)être en bas de l'échelle
to be at the top of the pile (fig)être en haut de l'échelle
(= heap) → tas m
a little pile of crumbs → un petit tas de miettes
in a pile → en tas
Her clothes lay in a pile beside the bed → Ses habits gisaient en tas au pied du lit.
[carpet] → velours m
(= lots) piles of sth → des tas de qch
I've got piles of questions for you → J'ai des tas de questions à vous poser.
to have piles of money → avoir des masses d'argent
a pile of sth → un tas de qch
I've got a pile of work to do → J'ai un tas de travail à faire.
(= fortune) to make one's pile → faire son beurre
(also atomic pile) → pile f atomique
(= impressive house) → résidence f
(= supporting post) piles → pilotis m
on piles → sur pilotis
vt
(= stack) → empiler
She piled the newspapers in a corner of the room → Elle empila les journaux dans un coin de la pièce.
He was piling clothes into the case → Il empilait les vêtements dans la valise.
piled with sth
Tables were piled high with local produce → Les produits du terroir s'empilaient sur les tables.
trucks piled with luggage → des camions où s'empilent les bagages
pile in
vis'entasser
The gates have opened and the crowd are piling in → Les portes se sont ouvertes et la foule s'entasse.
My uncle had a Transit van and we'd all pile in → Mon oncle avait une camionnette et nous nous y entassions tous.
pile into
vt fus
(= enter in a disorganized way) → s'entasser dans
They all piled into his car → Ils se sont tous entassés dans sa voiture.
(= crash into) [vehicle] → s'encastrer
pile on
vt sep
to pile it on → en faire des tonnes
I know you wanted a bit of sympathy, but you were really piling it on → Je sais que tu recherchais un peu de compassion, mais tu en faisais vraiment des tonnes.
to pile on the pounds → accumuler les kilos
pile out
visortir pêle-mêle
A fleet of police cars arrived and dozens of officers piled out → Une escouade de voitures de police arriva et des dizaines d'agents en sortirent pêle-mêle.
pile out of
vt fus (= leave in a disorganized way) → sortir pêle-mêle de
We pulled into a parking lot and piled out of the car → Nous nous sommes arrêtés dans un parking et sommes sortis de la voiture pêle-mêle.
pile up
vt sep (= stack) → entasser
vi
(= form a pile) [papers, mail] → s'entasser
(= mount up) [work, debts, problems] → s'accumuler
The debts just kept piling up → Les dettes continuaient à s'accumuler.

pile

:
pile bridge
n(Pfahl)jochbrücke f
pile-driver
nRamme f
pile dwelling
nPfahlbau m

pile

1
n
(= heap)Stapel m, → Stoß m; to put things in a pileetw (auf)stapeln; her things lay or were in a pileihre Sachen lagen auf einem Haufen; he made a pile of the bookser stapelte die Bücher aufeinander; at the bottom/top of the pile (fig)untenan/obenauf
(inf: = large amount) → Haufen m, → Menge f, → Masse f; a great pile of workeine Menge or Masse (inf)Arbeit; piles of money/trouble/foodeine or jede Menge (inf)Geld/Ärger/Essen; a pile of things to domassenhaft zu tun (inf)
(inf: = fortune) → Vermögen nt; to make a pileeinen Haufen Geld verdienen; to make one’s pilesein Vermögen machen
(= funeral pile)Scheiterhaufen m
(liter, hum, = building) → ehrwürdiges Gebäude
(= atomic pile)Atommeiler m
vtstapeln; a table piled high with booksein Tisch mit Stapeln von Büchern; the sideboard was piled high with presentsauf der Anrichte stapelten sich die Geschenke

pile

2
n (= post)Pfahl m

pile

3
n (of carpet, cloth)Flor m

pile

1 [paɪl]
1. n
a. (heap, of books, records) → pila; (less tidy) → mucchio, cumulo
he put his things in a pile → ha ammucchiato le sue cose
b. (fam) (large amount) → mucchio, sacco
piles of → un mucchio di
a pile of → una montagna di
c. (fam) (fortune) → fortuna
my brother made a pile selling videos → mio fratello ha fatto una barca di soldi vendendo video
2. vt (stack) → impilare; (heap) → ammucchiare
a table piled high with books → un tavolo coperto da pile di libri
3. vi (fam) pile in!salta su!
to pile into a car → stiparsi or ammucchiarsi in una macchina
to pile on/off a bus → far ressa per salire sull'autobus/scendere dall'autobus
pile on vt + adv to pile on the pressure (fam) → fare pressione
to pile it on (fam) → esagerare, drammatizzare
to pile work on sb → caricare qn di lavoro
pile up
1. vi + adv (also) (fig) → accumularsi, ammucchiarsi
2. vt + advammucchiare, accumulare

pile

2 [paɪl] n (of carpet, cloth) → pelo

pile

3 [paɪl] n (Constr) → palo

pile1

(pail) noun
1. a (large) number of things lying on top of each other in a tidy or untidy heap; a (large) quantity of something lying in a heap. There was a neat pile of books in the corner of the room; There was pile of rubbish at the bottom of the garden.
2. a large quantity, especially of money. He must have piles of money to own a car like that.
verb
to make a pile of (something); to put (something) in a pile. He piled the boxes on the table.
ˈpile-up noun
an accident or crash involving usually several vehicles. There has been a serious pile-up on the motorway, involving three cars and a lorry.
pile up
to make or become a pile; to accumulate. He piled up the earth at the end of the garden; The rubbish piled up in the kitchen.

pile2

(pail) noun
a large pillar or stake driven into the ground as a foundation for a building, bridge etc. The entire city of Venice is built on piles.
ˈpile-driver noun
a machine for driving piles into the ground.

pile3

(pail) noun
the thick soft surface of carpets and some kinds of cloth eg velvet. The rug has a deep/thick pile.

pile

كَوْمَة hromada stak Haufen σωρός pila pino pile gomila pila 積み重ね 퇴적물 hoop stabel stos pilha стопка hög กอง yığın đống