pillage


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pil·lage

 (pĭl′ĭj)
v. pil·laged, pil·lag·ing, pil·lag·es
v.tr.
1. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; plunder.
2. To take as spoils.
v.intr.
To take spoils by force.
n.
1. The act of pillaging.
2. Something pillaged; spoils.

[From Middle English, booty, from Old French, from piller, to take (by ruse), plunder, manhandle, from Vulgar Latin *pīliāre, perhaps originally meaning "to deprive (someone) of his felt cap" and derived from Latin pilleus, pīleus, felt cap (given to an ancient Roman freedman as a symbol of his emancipation); perhaps akin to Greek pīlos, felt.]

pil′lag·er n.

pillage

(ˈpɪlɪdʒ)
vb
to rob (a town, village, etc) of (booty or spoils), esp during a war
n
1. the act of pillaging
2. something obtained by pillaging; booty
[C14: via Old French from piller to despoil, probably from peille rag, from Latin pīleus felt cap]
ˈpillager n

pil•lage

(ˈpɪl ɪdʒ)

v. -laged, -lag•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to strip ruthlessly of money or goods by open violence, as in war; plunder.
2. to take as booty.
v.i.
3. to rob with open violence; take booty.
n.
4. the act of plundering, esp. in war.
5. booty.
[1350–1400; Middle English pilage < Middle French pillage, derivative of piller to pillage, orig., to abuse, tear]
pil′lag•er, n.

pillage

1. the act of plundering or large scale robbery, usually accompanied by violence as in wartime.
2. plundered property; booty.
See also: Theft, War

pillage


Past participle: pillaged
Gerund: pillaging

Imperative
pillage
pillage
Present
I pillage
you pillage
he/she/it pillages
we pillage
you pillage
they pillage
Preterite
I pillaged
you pillaged
he/she/it pillaged
we pillaged
you pillaged
they pillaged
Present Continuous
I am pillaging
you are pillaging
he/she/it is pillaging
we are pillaging
you are pillaging
they are pillaging
Present Perfect
I have pillaged
you have pillaged
he/she/it has pillaged
we have pillaged
you have pillaged
they have pillaged
Past Continuous
I was pillaging
you were pillaging
he/she/it was pillaging
we were pillaging
you were pillaging
they were pillaging
Past Perfect
I had pillaged
you had pillaged
he/she/it had pillaged
we had pillaged
you had pillaged
they had pillaged
Future
I will pillage
you will pillage
he/she/it will pillage
we will pillage
you will pillage
they will pillage
Future Perfect
I will have pillaged
you will have pillaged
he/she/it will have pillaged
we will have pillaged
you will have pillaged
they will have pillaged
Future Continuous
I will be pillaging
you will be pillaging
he/she/it will be pillaging
we will be pillaging
you will be pillaging
they will be pillaging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pillaging
you have been pillaging
he/she/it has been pillaging
we have been pillaging
you have been pillaging
they have been pillaging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pillaging
you will have been pillaging
he/she/it will have been pillaging
we will have been pillaging
you will have been pillaging
they will have been pillaging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pillaging
you had been pillaging
he/she/it had been pillaging
we had been pillaging
you had been pillaging
they had been pillaging
Conditional
I would pillage
you would pillage
he/she/it would pillage
we would pillage
you would pillage
they would pillage
Past Conditional
I would have pillaged
you would have pillaged
he/she/it would have pillaged
we would have pillaged
you would have pillaged
they would have pillaged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pillage - goods or money obtained illegallypillage - goods or money obtained illegally  
stolen property - property that has been stolen
cut - a share of the profits; "everyone got a cut of the earnings"
2.pillage - the act of stealing valuable things from a placepillage - the act of stealing valuable things from a place; "the plundering of the Parthenon"; "his plundering of the great authors"
aggression, hostility - violent action that is hostile and usually unprovoked
banditry - the practice of plundering in gangs
rapine, rape - the act of despoiling a country in warfare
looting, robbery - plundering during riots or in wartime
despoilation, despoilment, despoliation, spoilation, spoliation, spoil - the act of stripping and taking by force
ravaging, devastation - plundering with excessive damage and destruction
depredation, predation - an act of plundering and pillaging and marauding
sack - the plundering of a place by an army or mob; usually involves destruction and slaughter; "the sack of Rome"
Verb1.pillage - steal goods; take as spoils; "During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
deplume, displume - strip of honors, possessions, or attributes

pillage

verb
1. plunder, strip, sack, rob, raid, spoil (archaic), rifle, loot, ravage, ransack, despoil, maraud, reive (dialect), depredate (rare), freeboot, spoliate Soldiers went on a rampage, pillaging stores and shooting.
noun
1. plundering, sacking, robbery, plunder, sack, devastation, marauding, depredation, rapine, spoliation There were no signs of violence or pillage.

pillage

verb
To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: harrow, spoil.
noun
Goods or property seized unlawfully, especially by a victor in wartime:
booty, loot, plunder, spoil (used in plural).
Slang: boodle.
Nautical: prize.
Translations
rüüstamarüüstamine
ryöstää
plundra

pillage

[ˈpɪlɪdʒ]
A. Npillaje m, saqueo m
B. VT & VIsaquear

pillage

[ˈpɪlɪdʒ]
vtpiller
vipiller
npillage m

pillage

n (= act)Plünderung f; (= booty)Beute f
vtiplündern

pillage

[ˈpɪlɪdʒ]
1. vtsaccheggiare
2. vidarsi al saccheggio
References in classic literature ?
I was surprised to find corruption grown so high and so quick in that empire, by the force of luxury so lately introduced; which made me less wonder at many parallel cases in other countries, where vices of all kinds have reigned so much longer, and where the whole praise, as well as pillage, has been engrossed by the chief commander, who perhaps had the least title to either.
Some obtain these testimonials with good intentions, others put them to a cunning use; for when they go to pillage on Christian territory, if they chance to be cast away, or taken prisoners, they produce their certificates and say that from these papers may be seen the object they came for, which was to remain on Christian ground, and that it was to this end they joined the Turks in their foray.
The consequence is that he permits the bashaws or governors of provinces to pillage the people without mercy; and, in turn, squeezes out of them the sums of which he stands in need, to satisfy his own exigencies and those of the state.
He had shown no emotion of any kind, either at Philippe's danger, or at the fight which ended in the pillage of the carriage and their expulsion from it.
But suppose the Hindoos or Indians pull up the rails," replied Stuart; "suppose they stop the trains, pillage the luggage-vans, and scalp the passengers
The enemy's army extended from Cassel to Courtray; and as there was no species of violence or pillage it did not commit, the poor people on the frontier quitted their isolated dwellings and fled for refuge into the strong cities which held out a shelter to them.
The habits of trade and the avidity of gain have their corrupting effects even in the wilderness, as may be instanced in the members of this aboriginal emporium; for the same journalist denounces them as "saucy, impudent rascals, who will steal when they can, and pillage whenever a weak party falls in their power.
The founder of this house did something which his fellow ruffians very seldom did; something that had to be hushed up even in the anarchy of the pillage of the monasteries.
After a thousand scenes of pillage, of vexation, and attacks by armed forces, their caravan arrived, in October, at the vast oasis of Asben.
The Oriental fable of the poor Arab who carried away from the pillage of palace a kettle at the bottom of which was concealed a bag of gold, and whom everybody allowed to pass without jealousy, - this fable had become a truth in the prince's mansion.
The hosts of Helium would batter at the gates of Manator, the great green warriors of John Carter's savage allies would swarm up from the dead sea bottoms lusting for pillage and for loot, the stately ships of her beloved navy would soar above the unprotected towers and minarets of the doomed city which only capitulation and heavy tribute could then save.
Like monkeys they scrambled aboard, swarming below deck in search, thought von Horn, of pillage.