pillage

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Related to pillagers: looting

pil·lage

 (pĭl′ĭj)
v. pil·laged, pil·lag·ing, pil·lag·es
v.tr.
1. To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war; plunder.
2. To take as spoils.
v.intr.
To take spoils by force.
n.
1. The act of pillaging.
2. Something pillaged; spoils.

[From Middle English, booty, from Old French, from piller, to take (by ruse), plunder, manhandle, from Vulgar Latin *pīliāre, perhaps originally meaning "to deprive (someone) of his felt cap" and derived from Latin pilleus, pīleus, felt cap (given to an ancient Roman freedman as a symbol of his emancipation); perhaps akin to Greek pīlos, felt.]

pil′lag·er n.

pillage

(ˈpɪlɪdʒ)
vb
to rob (a town, village, etc) of (booty or spoils), esp during a war
n
1. the act of pillaging
2. something obtained by pillaging; booty
[C14: via Old French from piller to despoil, probably from peille rag, from Latin pīleus felt cap]
ˈpillager n

pil•lage

(ˈpɪl ɪdʒ)

v. -laged, -lag•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to strip ruthlessly of money or goods by open violence, as in war; plunder.
2. to take as booty.
v.i.
3. to rob with open violence; take booty.
n.
4. the act of plundering, esp. in war.
5. booty.
[1350–1400; Middle English pilage < Middle French pillage, derivative of piller to pillage, orig., to abuse, tear]
pil′lag•er, n.

pillage

1. the act of plundering or large scale robbery, usually accompanied by violence as in wartime.
2. plundered property; booty.
See also: Theft, War

pillage


Past participle: pillaged
Gerund: pillaging

Imperative
pillage
pillage
Present
I pillage
you pillage
he/she/it pillages
we pillage
you pillage
they pillage
Preterite
I pillaged
you pillaged
he/she/it pillaged
we pillaged
you pillaged
they pillaged
Present Continuous
I am pillaging
you are pillaging
he/she/it is pillaging
we are pillaging
you are pillaging
they are pillaging
Present Perfect
I have pillaged
you have pillaged
he/she/it has pillaged
we have pillaged
you have pillaged
they have pillaged
Past Continuous
I was pillaging
you were pillaging
he/she/it was pillaging
we were pillaging
you were pillaging
they were pillaging
Past Perfect
I had pillaged
you had pillaged
he/she/it had pillaged
we had pillaged
you had pillaged
they had pillaged
Future
I will pillage
you will pillage
he/she/it will pillage
we will pillage
you will pillage
they will pillage
Future Perfect
I will have pillaged
you will have pillaged
he/she/it will have pillaged
we will have pillaged
you will have pillaged
they will have pillaged
Future Continuous
I will be pillaging
you will be pillaging
he/she/it will be pillaging
we will be pillaging
you will be pillaging
they will be pillaging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pillaging
you have been pillaging
he/she/it has been pillaging
we have been pillaging
you have been pillaging
they have been pillaging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pillaging
you will have been pillaging
he/she/it will have been pillaging
we will have been pillaging
you will have been pillaging
they will have been pillaging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pillaging
you had been pillaging
he/she/it had been pillaging
we had been pillaging
you had been pillaging
they had been pillaging
Conditional
I would pillage
you would pillage
he/she/it would pillage
we would pillage
you would pillage
they would pillage
Past Conditional
I would have pillaged
you would have pillaged
he/she/it would have pillaged
we would have pillaged
you would have pillaged
they would have pillaged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pillage - goods or money obtained illegallypillage - goods or money obtained illegally  
stolen property - property that has been stolen
cut - a share of the profits; "everyone got a cut of the earnings"
2.pillage - the act of stealing valuable things from a placepillage - the act of stealing valuable things from a place; "the plundering of the Parthenon"; "his plundering of the great authors"
aggression, hostility - violent action that is hostile and usually unprovoked
banditry - the practice of plundering in gangs
rapine, rape - the act of despoiling a country in warfare
looting, robbery - plundering during riots or in wartime
despoilation, despoilment, despoliation, spoilation, spoliation, spoil - the act of stripping and taking by force
ravaging, devastation - plundering with excessive damage and destruction
depredation, predation - an act of plundering and pillaging and marauding
sack - the plundering of a place by an army or mob; usually involves destruction and slaughter; "the sack of Rome"
Verb1.pillage - steal goods; take as spoils; "During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"
deplume, displume - strip of honors, possessions, or attributes

pillage

verb
1. plunder, strip, sack, rob, raid, spoil (archaic), rifle, loot, ravage, ransack, despoil, maraud, reive (dialect), depredate (rare), freeboot, spoliate Soldiers went on a rampage, pillaging stores and shooting.
noun
1. plundering, sacking, robbery, plunder, sack, devastation, marauding, depredation, rapine, spoliation There were no signs of violence or pillage.

pillage

verb
To rob of goods by force, especially in time of war:
Archaic: harrow, spoil.
noun
Goods or property seized unlawfully, especially by a victor in wartime:
booty, loot, plunder, spoil (used in plural).
Slang: boodle.
Nautical: prize.
Translations
rüüstamarüüstamine
ryöstää
plundra

pillage

[ˈpɪlɪdʒ]
A. Npillaje m, saqueo m
B. VT & VIsaquear

pillage

[ˈpɪlɪdʒ]
vtpiller
vipiller
npillage m

pillage

n (= act)Plünderung f; (= booty)Beute f
vtiplündern

pillage

[ˈpɪlɪdʒ]
1. vtsaccheggiare
2. vidarsi al saccheggio
References in classic literature ?
Felton only expressed, with regard to the duke, the feeling of execration which all the English had declared toward him whom the Catholics themselves called the extortioner, the pillager, the debauchee, and whom the Puritans styled simply Satan.
For my wife Elizabeth, the Vikings take top billing, although I suspect she was rooting for the Scandinavian pillagers and not their peasant victims or the damsel in distress.
Experience taught them they were more likely to encounter rapists and pillagers than a kindly band of Danish social workers.
Erol Rizaov wonders in Utrinski vesnik whether someone will help archbishop Timotej to defend Clement's city Ohrid and the holy waters of the lake from the pillagers.
Thanks to centuries of rotten PR, their image as pillagers and looters is so ingrained in the popular imagination it is unlikely to be shifted any time soon.
Jones soon appeared on Dan Abrams's show on MSNBC and on CBS's Early Show, and dozens of other news outlets featured her story prominently, including CNN and Keith Olbermann's Countdown, where the outspoken host compared Halliburton to barbarians and pillagers.
In short, the use of rational basis review has meant that "property is at the mercy of the pillagers.
Obviously, several artefacts have been recovered from here; the pillagers hide their loot on-site in convenient tombs and covered by desiccated reeds and maize stalks.
Frankie v The Pirate Pillagers will be published in June this year.
The books will be aimed at children aged five and above and the first title, Frankie Versus The Pirate Pillagers, will be published in June 2013.
THOUGH PORTUGAL, as slave transporters and pillagers, has been on Angolan soil for 500 years, it was only at the beginning of the 20th century that its take-over of the country was completed.