piñon jay

(redirected from pinon jay)
Related to pinon jay: Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus

piñon jay

n.
Variant of pinyon jay.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Flocking and annual cycle of the pinon jay, Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus.
Green cones of the pinon pine stimulate late summer breeding in the pinon jay.
pinon seed assessment by the pinon jay, Gymnorhinus cyanocephalus.
Some corvids, like Clark's nutcrackers (Nucifraga columbiana) and pinon jays (Gymnnorhinus cyanocephalus), have relatively long, pointed bills and can pry open unripened cones and extract seeds (Vander Wall & Balda, 1981).
pinon jays and nutcrackers are known to use the coloration of Pinus edulis and P.
Scrub jays live in pairs and are more secretive than pinon jays, but it is possible that on a regional scale their population densities exceed those of the more conspicuous pinon jays.
Ligon (1978) estimated that a flock of 250 pinon jays could cache about 4.
This scene has been repeated in New Mexico for probably thousands of years, and benefits both the pinon and the pinon jay.
A complex and fascinating interdependent relationship exists between the pine and the bird (including both the gregarious pinon jay and the more solitary scrub jay).
One pinon jay is reported to have carried more than 50 seeds in a single trip, truly an amazing number.
The afternoon tranquility is suddenly shattered by the clamoring racket of a flock of several dozen blue pinon jays screeching to each other as they swoop into the forest.
Others include the gray jay (sometimes gray and white; also called Canada jay), found as far south as northern California and Arizona; blue jay (blue crest, back, wings, and tail; white on lower body with black "necklace" on throat), found in central Colorado and Wyoming; Mexican jay (like scrub, with gray throat), found in the Southwest; and pinon jay (wholly dull blue), found from the intermountain area east to Oklahoma.