pipes


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pipe

 (pīp)
n.
1.
a. A hollow cylinder or tube used to conduct a liquid, gas, or finely divided solid.
b. A section or piece of such a tube.
2.
a. A device for smoking, consisting of a tube of wood, clay, or other material with a small bowl at one end.
b. An amount of smoking material, such as tobacco, needed to fill the bowl of a pipe; a pipeful.
3. Informal
a. A tubular part or organ of the body.
b. pipes The passages of the human respiratory system.
4. Abbr. p.
a. A large wine cask, especially one having a capacity of 126 gallons or 2 hogsheads (478 liters).
b. This volume as a unit of liquid measure.
5. Music
a. A tubular wind instrument, such as a flute.
b. Any of the tubes in an organ.
c. pipes A small wind instrument, consisting of tubes of different lengths bound together.
d. pipes A bagpipe.
6. pipes Informal The vocal cords; the voice, especially as used in singing.
7. A birdcall.
8. Nautical A whistle used for signaling crew members: a boatswain's pipe.
9. Geology
a. A vertical cylindrical vein of ore.
b. One of the vertical veins of eruptive origin in which diamonds are found in South Africa.
10. Geology An eruptive passageway opening into the crater of a volcano.
11. Metallurgy A cone-shaped cavity in a steel ingot, formed during cooling by escaping gases.
v. piped, pip·ing, pipes
v.tr.
1.
a. To convey (liquid or gas) by means of pipes.
b. To convey as if by pipes, especially to transmit by wire or cable: piped music into the store.
2. To provide with pipes or connect with pipes.
3.
a. To play (a tune) on a pipe or pipes.
b. To lead by playing on pipes.
4. Nautical
a. To signal (crew members) with a boatswain's pipe.
b. To receive aboard or mark the departure of by sounding a boatswain's pipe.
5. To utter in a shrill reedy tone.
6. To furnish (a garment or fabric) with piping.
7. To force through a pastry tube, as frosting onto a cake.
8. Slang To take a look at; notice.
v.intr.
1. To play on a pipe.
2. To speak shrilly; make a shrill sound.
3. To chirp or whistle, as a bird does.
4. Nautical To signal the crew with a boatswain's pipe.
5. Metallurgy To develop conical cavities during solidification.
Phrasal Verbs:
pipe down Slang
To stop talking; be quiet.
pipe up
To speak up.

[Middle English, from Old English pīpe, from Vulgar Latin *pīpa, from Latin pīpāre, to chirp.]

pipes

(paɪps)
pl n
1. (Instruments) the pipes Scot the bagpipes
2. (Anatomy) the respiratory tract
3. (Anatomy) the vocal cords
Translations
القِرَب
dudy
sækkepibe
pánsíp
panflautasekkjapípur

pipe

(paip) noun
1. a tube, usually made of metal, earthenware etc, through which water, gas etc can flow. a water pipe; a drainpipe.
2. a small tube with a bowl at one end, in which tobacco is smoked. He smokes a pipe; (also adjective) pipe tobacco.
3. a musical instrument consisting of a hollow wooden, metal etc tube through which the player blows or causes air to be blown in order to make a sound. He played a tune on a bamboo pipe; an organ pipe.
verb
1. to convey gas, water etc by a pipe. Water is piped to the town from the reservoir.
2. to play (music) on a pipe or pipes. He piped a tune.
3. to speak in a high voice, make a high-pitched sound. `Hallo,' the little girl piped.
ˈpiper noun
a person who plays a pipe or pipes, especially the bagpipes.
pipes noun plural
bagpipes or some similar instrument. He plays the pipes.
ˈpiping noun
1. the act of playing a musical pipe or pipes.
2. (the act or process of conveying water, gas etc by means of) a length of pipe or number of pipes. lead piping; Piping the oil ashore will not be easy.
adjective
(of a sound) high-pitched. a piping voice.
pipe dream
an idea which can only be imagined, and which would be impossible to carry out. For most people a journey round the world is only a pipe dream.
ˈpipeline noun
a long line of pipes used for conveying oil, gas, water etc. an oil pipeline across the desert.
piping hot
very hot. piping hot soup.
References in classic literature ?
Funny, eh--just to think of them smoking pipes and chattering as they drove along as unconcerned as I am now.
Several pipes, that had been extinguished, were lighted again; while the newcomer, without speaking a word, drew his tomahawk from his girdle, and filling the bowl on its head began to inhale the vapors of the weed through the hollow handle, with as much indifference as if he had not been absent two weary days on a long and toilsome hunt.
The usual hurried, feverish toil in the claim was suspended; the pick and shovel were left sticking in the richest "pay gravel;" the toiling millionaires themselves, ragged, dirty, and perspiring, lay panting under the nearest shade, where the pipes went out listlessly, and conversation sank to monosyllables.
Human blood, in order to keep its freshness, should run in hidden streams, as the water of an aqueduct is conveyed in subterranean pipes.
I lost some time, now, for these big children, their fears gone, became so ravished with wonder over my awe-compelling fireworks that I had to stay there and smoke a couple of pipes out before they would let me go.
Buck and his ma and all of them smoked cob pipes, except the nigger woman, which was gone, and the two young women.
Finn the Red-Handed had stolen a skillet and a quan- tity of half-cured leaf tobacco, and had also brought a few corn-cobs to make pipes with.
Then came the "woodsy bit," with her feet pressing the slippery carpet of brown pine needles; the "woodsy bit" so full of dewy morning, surprises,--fungous growths of brilliant orange and crimson springing up around the stumps of dead trees, beautiful things born in a single night; and now and then the miracle of a little clump of waxen Indian pipes, seen just quickly enough to be saved from her careless tread.
I've a picture like it in one of my books--crowds of lovely people and children with garlands and branches with blossoms on them, everyone laughing and dancing and crowding and playing on pipes.
Drawers were left open; coats and hats, account-books and papers, pipes and fishing-rods were all scattered about together.
Cruncher beguiled the earlier watches of the night with solitary pipes, and did not start upon his excursion until nearly one o'clock.
I have seen Tom Pipes go climbing up the church-steeple; I have watched Strap, with the knapsack on his back, stopping to rest himself upon the wicket-gate; and I know that Commodore Trunnion held that club with Mr.