piquancy


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pi·quant

 (pē′kənt, -känt′, pē-känt′)
adj.
1. Pleasantly pungent or tart in taste; spicy.
2. Appealingly provocative; charming: a piquant wit; a piquant face.
3. Causing hurt feelings; stinging: "people with equally piquant opinions about obesity, appearance and American doublespeak about weight" (Virginia Heffernan).

[French, from Old French, present participle of piquer, to prick; see pique.]

pi′quan·cy, pi′quant·ness n.
pi′quant·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.piquancy - a tart spicy qualitypiquancy - a tart spicy quality      
spicery, spiciness, spice - the property of being seasoned with spice and so highly flavored
2.piquancy - the quality of being agreeably stimulating or mentally exciting
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare

piquancy

noun
1. spiciness, bite (informal), kick (informal), edge, flavour, spice, relish, zest, tang, sharpness, pungency a little mustard to add piquancy
2. interest, pep, zip (informal), vitality, colour, spirit, excitement, vigour, zing (informal), raciness, pizzazz or pizazz (informal) These facts lent a certain piquancy to the case.
Translations
حَرافَه
pikantnost
skarphed
csípõs ízfûszeres ízínycsiklandó ízpikáns íz
bragîskerpa; e-î kitlandi/spennandi
pikantnosť
hoşlukmayhoşluk

piquancy

[ˈpiːkənsɪ] Nlo fuerte, gusto m fuerte; [of situation] → chispa f, gracia f

piquancy

nPikantheit f, → Würze f; (fig)Pikanterie f

piquancy

[ˈpiːkənsɪ] n (of food) → gusto piccante; (of situation) → aspetto intrigante

piquant

(ˈpiːkənt) adjective
sharp in taste; appetizing. a piquant sauce; a piquant (= exciting or interesting) situation.
ˈpiquantly adverb
ˈpiquancy noun
References in classic literature ?
For, if you reflect a moment, you will see that, while it is easy to choose what virtues we would have our wife possess, it is all but impossible to imagine those faults we would desire in her, which I think most lovers would admit add piquancy to the loved one, that fascinating wayward imperfection which paradoxically makes her perfect.
That sauce was made up of contradictions and sufferings, of agonising inward analysis, and all these pangs and pin-pricks gave a certain piquancy, even a significance to my dissipation--in fact, completely answered the purpose of an appetising sauce.
It was a beautiful, though not precisely regular and somewhat haughty aspect, but with a certain piquancy about the eyes and mouth, which, of all expressions, would have seemed the most impossible to throw over a wooden countenance.
The answer was given in imperfect English, a circumstance that rendered the sweet round tones of the speaker very agreeable to the ear, and lent the charm of piquancy to what she said.
There were much glare and glitter and piquancy and phantasm--much of what has been since seen in "Hernani".
Had not my mind been so full of Polina, I should have given myself up to the comical piquancy of the impending denouement, and laughed my fill at it.
He was not exactly amused at the interpretation, but he could not help detecting- in it a certain piquancy.
The thoughts, too, that run around the ring of familiar guests have a piquancy and mirthfulness, and oftentimes a vivid truth, which more rarely find their way into the elaborate intercourse of dinner.
He had quitted the party early, and would have thought it altogether tedious but for the novelty of certain introductions, especially the introduction to Miss Brooke, whose youthful bloom, with her approaching marriage to that faded scholar, and her interest in matters socially useful, gave her the piquancy of an unusual combination.
Their talk had none of the piquancy which scandal and ill-natured gossip give to the conversation of society; only the father and uncle read the newspapers, even the most harmless journal contains references to crimes or to public evils, and she whom I hoped to win had never cast her eyes over their sheets.
But if Maggie had been the queen of coquettes she could hardly have invented a means of giving greater piquancy to her beauty in Stephen's eyes; I am not sure that the quiet admission of plain sewing and poverty would have done alone, but assisted by the beauty, they made Maggie more unlike other women even than she had seemed at first.
So God has armed youth and puberty and manhood no less with its own piquancy and charm, and made it enviable and gracious and its claims not to be put by, if it will stand by itself.