pirate


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pi·rate

 (pī′rĭt)
n.
1. One who commits or practices piracy at sea.
2. One who makes use of or reproduces the work of another without authorization.
3. One who illegally intercepts or uses radio or television signals, especially one who operates an illegal television or radio station.
v. pi·rat·ed, pi·rat·ing, pi·rates
v.tr.
1. To attack and rob (a ship at sea).
2. To take (something) by piracy.
3. To make use of or reproduce (another's work) without authorization.
v.intr.
To act as a pirate; practice piracy.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pīrāta, from Greek peirātēs, from peirān, to attempt, from peira, trial; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

pi·rat′ic (pī-răt′ĭk), pi·rat′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
pi·rat′i·cal·ly adv.

pirate

(ˈpaɪrɪt)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a person who commits piracy
2. (Nautical Terms)
a. a vessel used by pirates
b. (as modifier): a pirate ship.
3. a person who illicitly uses or appropriates someone else's literary, artistic, or other work
4. (Broadcasting)
a. a person or group of people who broadcast illegally
b. (as modifier): a pirate radio station.
vb
(tr) to use, appropriate, or reproduce (artistic work, ideas, etc) illicitly
[C15: from Latin pīrāta, from Greek peirātēs one who attacks, from peira an attempt, attack]
piratical, piˈratic adj
piˈratically adv

pi•rate

(ˈpaɪ rət)

n., v. -rat•ed, -rat•ing. n.
1. a person who robs or commits illegal violence at sea or on the shores of the sea.
2. a ship used by such persons.
3. a person who uses or reproduces the work or invention of another without authorization.
4. a person who transmits radio or television signals illicitly.
v.t.
5. to commit piracy upon; plunder; rob.
6. to take by piracy.
7. to use or reproduce (a book, an invention, etc.) without authorization or legal right.
v.i.
8. to commit or practice piracy.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin pīrāta < Greek peirātḗs=peirā-, variant s. of peirân to attack + -tēs agent n. suffix]
pi•rat•i•cal (paɪˈræt ɪ kəl, pɪ-) pi•rat′ic, adj.
pi•rat′i•cal•ly, adv.

pirate


Past participle: pirated
Gerund: pirating

Imperative
pirate
pirate
Present
I pirate
you pirate
he/she/it pirates
we pirate
you pirate
they pirate
Preterite
I pirated
you pirated
he/she/it pirated
we pirated
you pirated
they pirated
Present Continuous
I am pirating
you are pirating
he/she/it is pirating
we are pirating
you are pirating
they are pirating
Present Perfect
I have pirated
you have pirated
he/she/it has pirated
we have pirated
you have pirated
they have pirated
Past Continuous
I was pirating
you were pirating
he/she/it was pirating
we were pirating
you were pirating
they were pirating
Past Perfect
I had pirated
you had pirated
he/she/it had pirated
we had pirated
you had pirated
they had pirated
Future
I will pirate
you will pirate
he/she/it will pirate
we will pirate
you will pirate
they will pirate
Future Perfect
I will have pirated
you will have pirated
he/she/it will have pirated
we will have pirated
you will have pirated
they will have pirated
Future Continuous
I will be pirating
you will be pirating
he/she/it will be pirating
we will be pirating
you will be pirating
they will be pirating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pirating
you have been pirating
he/she/it has been pirating
we have been pirating
you have been pirating
they have been pirating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pirating
you will have been pirating
he/she/it will have been pirating
we will have been pirating
you will have been pirating
they will have been pirating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pirating
you had been pirating
he/she/it had been pirating
we had been pirating
you had been pirating
they had been pirating
Conditional
I would pirate
you would pirate
he/she/it would pirate
we would pirate
you would pirate
they would pirate
Past Conditional
I would have pirated
you would have pirated
he/she/it would have pirated
we would have pirated
you would have pirated
they would have pirated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pirate - someone who uses another person's words or ideas as if they were his ownpirate - someone who uses another person's words or ideas as if they were his own
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
2.pirate - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nationpirate - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nation
Barbary pirate, corsair - a pirate along the Barbary Coast
despoiler, freebooter, looter, pillager, plunderer, raider, spoiler - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)
sea king - a Viking pirate chief
3.pirate - a ship that is manned by piratespirate - a ship that is manned by pirates  
corsair - a swift pirate ship (often operating with official sanction)
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Verb1.pirate - copy illegally; of published material
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
2.pirate - take arbitrarily or by force; "The Cubans commandeered the plane and flew it to Miami"
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
seize - take or capture by force; "The terrorists seized the politicians"; "The rebels threaten to seize civilian hostages"
skyjack - subject an aircraft to air piracy; "the plane was skyjacked to Uzbekistan"
carjack - take someone's car from him by force, usually with the intention of stealing it; "My car was carjacked last night!"

pirate

noun
1. buccaneer, raider, rover, filibuster, marauder, corsair, sea wolf, freebooter, sea robber, sea rover In the nineteenth century, pirates roamed the seas.
2. plagiarist, plagiarizer, cribber (informal), copyright infringer software pirates who turn out cheap copies of copyright games
verb
1. copy, steal, reproduce, bootleg, lift (informal), appropriate, borrow, poach, crib (informal), plagiarize pirated copies of music tapes

pirate

noun
One who illicitly reproduces the artistic work, for example, of another:
verb
To reproduce (the artistic work of another, for example) illicitly:
Translations
قُرْصانيَنْشُر بِدون تَفْويض
pirátvydat bez povolení
piratsørøver
pirato
piraat
merirosvopiraatti
gusar
irodalmi kalózkalózkalózkiadásban megjelentet
sjóræningie-r sem brÿtur einkaréttarlöggefa út/útvarpa í heimildarleysi
海賊
해적
pirata
išleisti pažeidžiant autorines teisespiratavimastransliuoti pažeidžiant autorines teises
izdarīt literāru u.tml. zādzībupārkāpt autortiesībaspirāts
piratapirateado
pirat
vydať bez povolenia
gusarpirat
piratsjörövare
โจรสลัด
korsankorsan yayın yapmak/basmak
cướp biển

pirate

[ˈpaɪərɪt]
A. Npirata mf (also in publishing)
B. VT [+ book, tape, video, software] → piratear
C. CPDpirata inv
pirate broadcasting, pirate radio Nemisión f pirata
pirate radio station Nemisora f pirata

pirate

[ˈpaɪrət]
n
(at sea)pirate m/f
(= bootlegger) → pirate m/f
modif
[treasure, flag, crew] → de pirates
[material, video, tape, edition] → pirate
vt [+ tape, video, book, computer game] → piraterpirate copy ncopie f pirate

pirate

nSeeräuber(in) m(f), → Pirat(in) m(f); (= pirate ship)Seeräuberschiff nt, → Piratenschiff nt; (also pirate cab)nicht konzessioniertes Taxi
vt bookeinen Raubdruck herstellen von; invention, ideastehlen; a pirated copy of the recordeine Raubpressung; pirated editionRaubdruck m

pirate

[ˈpaɪrɪt]
1. n (also) (fig) → pirata m
2. vt (product) → contraffare; (idea) → impossessarsi di; (record, video, book) → riprodurre abusivamente

pirate

(ˈpaiərət) noun
1. a person who attacks and robs ships at sea. Their ship was attacked by pirates; (also adjective) a pirate ship.
2. a person who does something without legal right, eg publishes someone else's work as his own or broadcasts without a licence. a pirate radio-station.
verb
to publish, broadcast etc without the legal right to do so. The dictionary was pirated and sold abroad.
ˈpiracy noun
the act(s) of a pirate. He was accused of piracy on the high seas; Publishing that book under his own name was piracy.

pirate

قُرْصان pirát pirat Pirat πειρατής pirata merirosvo pirate gusar pirata 海賊 해적 piraat sjørøver pirat pirata пират pirat โจรสลัด korsan cướp biển 海盗
References in classic literature ?
roared the captain, as a Portuguese pirate hove in sight, with a flag black as ink flying from her foremast.
I'd give it all to you, the pirate gold and every bit of treasure we could dig up.
The sailor of that day would go near to be arraigned as a pirate in our own.
And thus have these naked Nantucketers, these sea hermits, issuing from their ant-hill in the sea, overrun and conquered the watery world like so many Alexanders; parcelling out among them the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans, as the three pirate powers did Poland.
Upon the ocean of commerce it sailed as a pirate ship; it had hoisted the black flag and declared war upon civilization.
Simon Legree, Tom's master, had purchased slaves at one place and another, in New Orleans, to the number of eight, and driven them, handcuffed, in couples of two and two, down to the good steamer Pirate, which lay at the levee, ready for a trip up the Red river.
The right of the grim-visaged pirate upon the high seas is exactly the same.
An English hero of the road would be the next best thing to an Italian bandit; and that could only be surpassed by a Levantine pirate.
The man was limping on towards this latter, as if he were the pirate come to life, and come down, and going back to hook himself up again.
The chub and the dace and the carp, not to speak of that Chinese pirate the pike, might still look to it, when I came forth armed with rod and line; but for me and my house the trout is henceforth sacred.
I followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all, with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting, far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.
The largest of the two pirate ships was commanded by a Japanese captain, who spoke a little Dutch, but very imperfectly.