pirate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

pi·rate

 (pī′rĭt)
n.
1. One who commits or practices piracy at sea.
2. One who makes use of or reproduces the work of another without authorization.
3. One who illegally intercepts or uses radio or television signals, especially one who operates an illegal television or radio station.
v. pi·rat·ed, pi·rat·ing, pi·rates
v.tr.
1. To attack and rob (a ship at sea).
2. To take (something) by piracy.
3. To make use of or reproduce (another's work) without authorization.
v.intr.
To act as a pirate; practice piracy.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pīrāta, from Greek peirātēs, from peirān, to attempt, from peira, trial; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

pi·rat′ic (pī-răt′ĭk), pi·rat′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
pi·rat′i·cal·ly adv.

pirate

(ˈpaɪrɪt)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a person who commits piracy
2. (Nautical Terms)
a. a vessel used by pirates
b. (as modifier): a pirate ship.
3. a person who illicitly uses or appropriates someone else's literary, artistic, or other work
4. (Broadcasting)
a. a person or group of people who broadcast illegally
b. (as modifier): a pirate radio station.
vb
(tr) to use, appropriate, or reproduce (artistic work, ideas, etc) illicitly
[C15: from Latin pīrāta, from Greek peirātēs one who attacks, from peira an attempt, attack]
piratical, piˈratic adj
piˈratically adv

pi•rate

(ˈpaɪ rət)

n., v. -rat•ed, -rat•ing. n.
1. a person who robs or commits illegal violence at sea or on the shores of the sea.
2. a ship used by such persons.
3. a person who uses or reproduces the work or invention of another without authorization.
4. a person who transmits radio or television signals illicitly.
v.t.
5. to commit piracy upon; plunder; rob.
6. to take by piracy.
7. to use or reproduce (a book, an invention, etc.) without authorization or legal right.
v.i.
8. to commit or practice piracy.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Latin pīrāta < Greek peirātḗs=peirā-, variant s. of peirân to attack + -tēs agent n. suffix]
pi•rat•i•cal (paɪˈræt ɪ kəl, pɪ-) pi•rat′ic, adj.
pi•rat′i•cal•ly, adv.

pirate


Past participle: pirated
Gerund: pirating

Imperative
pirate
pirate
Present
I pirate
you pirate
he/she/it pirates
we pirate
you pirate
they pirate
Preterite
I pirated
you pirated
he/she/it pirated
we pirated
you pirated
they pirated
Present Continuous
I am pirating
you are pirating
he/she/it is pirating
we are pirating
you are pirating
they are pirating
Present Perfect
I have pirated
you have pirated
he/she/it has pirated
we have pirated
you have pirated
they have pirated
Past Continuous
I was pirating
you were pirating
he/she/it was pirating
we were pirating
you were pirating
they were pirating
Past Perfect
I had pirated
you had pirated
he/she/it had pirated
we had pirated
you had pirated
they had pirated
Future
I will pirate
you will pirate
he/she/it will pirate
we will pirate
you will pirate
they will pirate
Future Perfect
I will have pirated
you will have pirated
he/she/it will have pirated
we will have pirated
you will have pirated
they will have pirated
Future Continuous
I will be pirating
you will be pirating
he/she/it will be pirating
we will be pirating
you will be pirating
they will be pirating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pirating
you have been pirating
he/she/it has been pirating
we have been pirating
you have been pirating
they have been pirating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pirating
you will have been pirating
he/she/it will have been pirating
we will have been pirating
you will have been pirating
they will have been pirating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pirating
you had been pirating
he/she/it had been pirating
we had been pirating
you had been pirating
they had been pirating
Conditional
I would pirate
you would pirate
he/she/it would pirate
we would pirate
you would pirate
they would pirate
Past Conditional
I would have pirated
you would have pirated
he/she/it would have pirated
we would have pirated
you would have pirated
they would have pirated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pirate - someone who uses another person's words or ideas as if they were his ownpirate - someone who uses another person's words or ideas as if they were his own
stealer, thief - a criminal who takes property belonging to someone else with the intention of keeping it or selling it
2.pirate - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nationpirate - someone who robs at sea or plunders the land from the sea without having a commission from any sovereign nation
Barbary pirate, corsair - a pirate along the Barbary Coast
despoiler, freebooter, looter, pillager, plunderer, raider, spoiler - someone who takes spoils or plunder (as in war)
sea king - a Viking pirate chief
3.pirate - a ship that is manned by piratespirate - a ship that is manned by pirates  
corsair - a swift pirate ship (often operating with official sanction)
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Verb1.pirate - copy illegally; of published material
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
2.pirate - take arbitrarily or by force; "The Cubans commandeered the plane and flew it to Miami"
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
seize - take or capture by force; "The terrorists seized the politicians"; "The rebels threaten to seize civilian hostages"
skyjack - subject an aircraft to air piracy; "the plane was skyjacked to Uzbekistan"
carjack - take someone's car from him by force, usually with the intention of stealing it; "My car was carjacked last night!"

pirate

noun
1. buccaneer, raider, rover, filibuster, marauder, corsair, sea wolf, freebooter, sea robber, sea rover In the nineteenth century, pirates roamed the seas.
2. plagiarist, plagiarizer, cribber (informal), copyright infringer software pirates who turn out cheap copies of copyright games
verb
1. copy, steal, reproduce, bootleg, lift (informal), appropriate, borrow, poach, crib (informal), plagiarize pirated copies of music tapes

pirate

noun
One who illicitly reproduces the artistic work, for example, of another:
verb
To reproduce (the artistic work of another, for example) illicitly:
Translations
قُرْصانيَنْشُر بِدون تَفْويض
pirátvydat bez povolení
piratsørøver
pirato
piraat
merirosvopiraatti
gusar
irodalmi kalózkalózkalózkiadásban megjelentet
sjóræningie-r sem brÿtur einkaréttarlöggefa út/útvarpa í heimildarleysi
海賊
해적
pirata
išleisti pažeidžiant autorines teisespiratavimastransliuoti pažeidžiant autorines teises
izdarīt literāru u.tml. zādzībupārkāpt autortiesībaspirāts
piratapirateado
pirat
vydať bez povolenia
gusarpirat
piratsjörövare
โจรสลัด
korsankorsan yayın yapmak/basmak
cướp biển

pirate

[ˈpaɪərɪt]
A. Npirata mf (also in publishing)
B. VT [+ book, tape, video, software] → piratear
C. CPDpirata inv
pirate broadcasting, pirate radio Nemisión f pirata
pirate radio station Nemisora f pirata

pirate

[ˈpaɪrət]
n
(at sea)pirate m/f
(= bootlegger) → pirate m/f
modif
[treasure, flag, crew] → de pirates
[material, video, tape, edition] → pirate
vt [+ tape, video, book, computer game] → piraterpirate copy ncopie f pirate

pirate

nSeeräuber(in) m(f), → Pirat(in) m(f); (= pirate ship)Seeräuberschiff nt, → Piratenschiff nt; (also pirate cab)nicht konzessioniertes Taxi
vt bookeinen Raubdruck herstellen von; invention, ideastehlen; a pirated copy of the recordeine Raubpressung; pirated editionRaubdruck m

pirate

[ˈpaɪrɪt]
1. n (also) (fig) → pirata m
2. vt (product) → contraffare; (idea) → impossessarsi di; (record, video, book) → riprodurre abusivamente

pirate

(ˈpaiərət) noun
1. a person who attacks and robs ships at sea. Their ship was attacked by pirates; (also adjective) a pirate ship.
2. a person who does something without legal right, eg publishes someone else's work as his own or broadcasts without a licence. a pirate radio-station.
verb
to publish, broadcast etc without the legal right to do so. The dictionary was pirated and sold abroad.
ˈpiracy noun
the act(s) of a pirate. He was accused of piracy on the high seas; Publishing that book under his own name was piracy.

pirate

قُرْصان pirát pirat Pirat πειρατής pirata merirosvo pirate gusar pirata 海賊 해적 piraat sjørøver pirat pirata пират pirat โจรสลัด korsan cướp biển 海盗
References in classic literature ?
Joe was for being a hermit, and living on crusts in a remote cave, and dying, some time, of cold and want and grief; but after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate.
Here a little knot of struggling warriors trampled a bed of gorgeous pimalia; there the curved sword of a black man found the heart of a thern and left its dead foeman at the foot of a wondrous statue carved from a living ruby; yonder a dozen therns pressed a single pirate back upon a bench of emerald, upon whose iridescent surface a strangely beautiful Barsoomian design was traced out in inlaid diamonds.
And the winds of adventure blew the oyster pirate sloops up and down San Francisco Bay, from raided oyster-beds and fights at night on shoal and flat, to markets in the morning against city wharves, where peddlers and saloon-keepers came down to buy.
The largest of the two pirate ships was commanded by a Japanese captain, who spoke a little Dutch, but very imperfectly.
Hence, I conclude, that in boasting himself to be high lifted above a whaleman, in that assertion the pirate has no solid basis to stand on.
Upon this we fell into further discourse, in which, to my alarm and amazement, he spoke of the villainous doings of a certain pirate ship that had long been the talk of mariners in those seas; no other, in a word, than the very ship he was now on board of, and which we had so unluckily purchased.
Virginia took a keen delight in watching the Malays and lascars at their work, telling von Horn that she had to draw upon her imagination but little to picture herself a captive upon a pirate ship--the half naked men, the gaudy headdress, the earrings, and the fierce countenances of many of the crew furnishing only too realistically the necessary savage setting.
And if the friends sent no money, the pirates often threw the people into the sea.
The fairies take an hour longer in the morning, the beasts attend to their young, the redskins feed heavily for six days and nights, and when pirates and lost boys meet they merely bite their thumbs at each other.
A roar of laughter went up from the different boats, for the rest of the pirates had been listening to the discussion.
So the king went all through the crowd with his hat swabbing his eyes, and blessing the people and praising them and thanking them for being so good to the poor pirates away off there; and every little while the prettiest kind of girls, with the tears running down their cheeks, would up and ask him would he let them kiss him for to remember him by; and he always done it; and some of them he hugged and kissed as many as five or six times -- and he was invited to stay a week; and everybody wanted him to live in their houses, and said they'd think it was an honor; but he said as this was the last day of the camp-meeting he couldn't do no good, and besides he was in a sweat to get to the Indian Ocean right off and go to work on the pirates.
Presently there came swiftly over the sparkling sea Tyrsenian (30) pirates on a well- decked ship -- a miserable doom led them on.