piratical


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pi·rate

 (pī′rĭt)
n.
1. One who commits or practices piracy at sea.
2. One who makes use of or reproduces the work of another without authorization.
3. One who illegally intercepts or uses radio or television signals, especially one who operates an illegal television or radio station.
v. pi·rat·ed, pi·rat·ing, pi·rates
v.tr.
1. To attack and rob (a ship at sea).
2. To take (something) by piracy.
3. To make use of or reproduce (another's work) without authorization.
v.intr.
To act as a pirate; practice piracy.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pīrāta, from Greek peirātēs, from peirān, to attempt, from peira, trial; see per- in Indo-European roots.]

pi·rat′ic (pī-răt′ĭk), pi·rat′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
pi·rat′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.piratical - characteristic of pirates; "piratical attackers"
2.piratical - characteristic of piracy; "piratical editions of my book"
Translations

piratical

[paɪˈrætɪkəl] ADJpirático

piratical

adjseeräuberisch, piratenhaft
References in classic literature ?
So have I seen a bird with clipped wing, making affrighted broken circles in the air, vainly striving to escape the piratical hawks.
A little green worm came crawling over a dewy leaf, lifting two-thirds of his body into the air from time to time and "sniffing around," then proceeding again -- for he was measuring, Tom said; and when the worm approached him, of its own accord, he sat as still as a stone, with his hopes rising and falling, by turns, as the creature still came toward him or seemed inclined to go elsewhere; and when at last it considered a painful moment with its curved body in the air and then came decisively down upon Tom's leg and began a journey over him, his whole heart was glad -- for that meant that he was going to have a new suit of clothes -- without the shadow of a doubt a gaudy piratical uniform.
Peggotty's house on a piratical expedition, with a black flag at the masthead, bearing the inscription 'Tidd's Practice', under which diabolical ensign he was carrying me and little Em'ly to the Spanish Main, to be drowned.
They jeered the piratical private, and called attention to various defects in his personal ap- pearance; and they were wildly enthusiastic in support of the young girl.
Instead of accepting their invitation, Captain Bonneville took his departure with all possible dispatch, eager to be out of the vicinity of such a piratical horde; nor did he relax the diligence of his march, until, on the second day, he reached the banks of the Sweet Water, beyond the limits of the Crow country, and a heavy fall of snow had obliterated all traces of his course.
On board the Tremolino, wrapped up in a black CABAN, the picturesque cloak of Mediterranean seamen, with those massive moustaches and his remorseless eyes set off by the shadow of the deep hood, he looked piratical and monkish and darkly initiated into the most awful mysteries of the sea.
Some lost heart, and proposed to return, rather than fight their way, and, in a manner, run the gauntlet through the country of these piratical marauders.
It looked like a piratical division of loot; but Tom Platt came out of it roped with black pigtail and stuffed with cakes of chewing and smoking tobacco.
He momentarily fulfilled all Fanshaw's fable of an old piratical Admiral; though the details seemed afterwards to decompose into accidents.
He calls the rich men together, the highest bidder gets the speculation, pays the Pacha on the spot, and then sells out to smaller fry, who sell in turn to a piratical horde of still smaller fry.
Now the power of the crafty old Malay extended from one end of this great river on which the long-house lay to the other, and though not all the tribes admitted allegiance to him, yet there were few who would not furnish him with men and boats when he required them; for his piratical cruises carried him often up and down the stream, and with his savage horde it was possible for him to wreak summary and terrible vengeance upon those who opposed him.
They were barbarians, living partly from piratical expeditions against the northern and eastern coasts of Europe, partly from their flocks and herds, and partly from a rude sort of agriculture.