pita

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pi·ta 1

 (pē′tə)
n.
A round flat bread of Middle Eastern origin that can be opened to form a pocket for filling. Also called pocket bread.

[Modern Greek pita, pie, cake, bread, from Medieval Greek, perhaps of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German bizzo, pizzo, bite, morsel; see bheid- in Indo-European roots.]

pi·ta 2

 (pē′tə)
n.
1. Any of several agaves that yield strong leaf fibers. Also called istle.
2. The fiber of any of these plants, used in making cordage and paper.

[Spanish, perhaps of Taíno origin; perhaps akin to Taíno pitahaya, pitahaya.]

pita

(ˈpiːtə)
n
1. (Plants) any of several agave plants yielding a strong fibre. See also istle
2. (Plants) a species of pineapple, Ananas magdalenae, the leaves of which yield a white fibre
3. (Plants) Also called: pita fibre the fibre obtained from any of these plants, used in making cordage and paper
[C17: via Spanish from Quechua]

pi•ta1

(ˈpi tə)

n., pl. -tas.
1. a fiber obtained from plants of the genera Agave, Aechmea, etc., used for cordage, mats, etc.
2. any of these plants.
[1690–1700; < American Spanish < Quechua pita or Aymara p'ita]

pi•ta2

(ˈpi tɑ, -tə)

n.
a round, flat Middle Eastern bread having a pocket that can be filled to make a sandwich. Also called pi′ta bread`.
[1950–55, Amer.; < Modern Greek pētta, pitta bread, cake, pie]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pita - usually small round bread that can open into a pocket for fillingpita - usually small round bread that can open into a pocket for filling
flatbread - any of various breads made from usually unleavened dough
gyro - a Greek sandwich: sliced roast lamb with onion and tomato stuffed into pita bread
Middle East, Mideast, Near East - the area around the eastern Mediterranean; from Turkey to northern Africa and eastward to Iran; the site of such ancient civilizations as Phoenicia and Babylon and Egypt and the birthplace of Judaism and Christianity and Islam; had continuous economic and political turmoil in the 20th century; "the Middle East is the cradle of Western civilization"