pitched


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Related to pitched: pitched battle

pitch 1

 (pĭch)
n.
1. Any of various thick, dark, sticky substances obtained from the distillation residue of coal tar, wood tar, or petroleum and used for waterproofing, roofing, caulking, and paving.
2. Any of various natural bitumens, such as mineral pitch or asphalt.
3. A resin derived from the sap of various coniferous trees, as the pines.
tr.v. pitched, pitch·ing, pitch·es
To smear or cover with pitch.

[Middle English pich, from Old English pic and from Anglo-Norman piche, both from Latin pix, pic-.]

pitch 2

 (pĭch)
v. pitched, pitch·ing, pitch·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To throw, usually with careful aim. See Synonyms at throw.
b. To discard by throwing: pitched my worn-out sneakers.
2. Baseball
a. To throw (the ball) from the mound to the batter.
b. To play (a game or part of a game) as pitcher.
c. To assign as pitcher: The manager decided to pitch a left-hander.
3. To erect or establish; set up: pitched a tent; pitch camp.
4. To set firmly; implant; embed: pitched stakes in the ground.
5. To set at a specified downward slant: pitched the roof at a steep angle.
6.
a. To set at a particular level, degree, or quality: pitched her expectations too high.
b. Music To set the pitch or key of.
c. To adapt so as to be applicable; direct: pitched his speech to the teenagers in the audience.
7. Informal To attempt to promote or sell, often in a high-pressure manner: "showed up on local TV to pitch their views" (Business Week).
8. Sports To hit (a golf ball) in a high arc with backspin so that it does not roll very far after striking the ground.
9. Games
a. To lead (a card), thus establishing the trump suit.
b. To discard (a card other than a trump and different in suit from the card led).
v.intr.
1. To throw or toss something, such as a ball, horseshoe, or bale.
2. Baseball To play in the position of pitcher.
3. To plunge headlong: He pitched over the railing.
4.
a. To stumble around; lurch.
b. To buck, as a horse.
5.
a. Nautical To dip bow and stern alternately.
b. To oscillate about a lateral axis so that the nose lifts or descends in relation to the tail. Used of an aircraft.
c. To oscillate about a lateral axis that is both perpendicular to the longitudinal axis and horizontal to the earth. Used of a missile or spacecraft.
6. To slope downward: The hill pitches steeply.
7. To set up living quarters; encamp; settle.
8. Sports To hit a golf ball in a high arc with backspin so that it does not roll very far after striking the ground.
n.
1. The act or an instance of pitching.
2. Baseball
a. A throw of the ball by the pitcher to the batter.
b. A ball so thrown: hit the pitch into left field.
3. Sports A playing field. Also called wicket.
4.
a. Nautical The alternate dip and rise of a vessel's bow and stern.
b. The alternate lift and descent of the nose and tail of an airplane.
5.
a. A steep slope.
b. The degree of such a slope.
c. Sports A single interval between ledges or anchors used as belaying points in mountaineering: a climb of six pitches.
6. Architecture
a. The angle of a roof.
b. The highest point of a structure: the pitch of an arch.
7. A level or degree, as of intensity: worked at a feverish pitch.
8.
a. Acoustics The distinctive quality of a sound, dependent primarily on the frequency of the sound waves produced by its source.
b. Music The relative position of a tone within a range of musical sounds, as determined by this quality.
c. Music Any of various standards for this quality associating each tone with a particular frequency.
9.
a. The distance traveled by a machine screw in a single revolution.
b. The distance between two corresponding points on adjacent screw threads or gear teeth.
c. The distance between two corresponding points on a helix.
10. The distance that a propeller would travel in an ideal medium during one complete revolution, measured parallel to the shaft of the propeller.
11. Informal
a. A line of talk designed to persuade: "[his] pious pitch for ... austerity" (Boston Globe).
b. An advertisement.
12. Chiefly British The stand of a vendor or hawker.
13. Games See seven-up.
14. Printing The density of characters in a printed line, usually expressed as characters per inch.
Phrasal Verbs:
pitch in Informal
1. To set to work vigorously.
2. To join forces with others; help or cooperate.
pitch into Informal
To attack verbally or physically; assault.
pitch on/upon
Informal To succeed in choosing or achieving, usually quickly: pitched on the ideal solution.

[Middle English pichen, probably from Old English *piccean, causative of *pīcian, to prick.]

pitched

(pɪtʃt)
adj
(Architecture) sloping downwards

pitched

- Describing a "steeply downward sloping" roof built at an angle.
See also related terms for sloping.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.pitched - (of sound) set to a certain pitch or key; usually used as a combining form; "high-pitched"
2.pitched - set at a slant; "a pitched rather than a flat roof"
inclined - at an angle to the horizontal or vertical position; "an inclined plane"
Translations

pitched

[pɪtʃt] ADJ pitched battle (Mil, fig) → batalla f campal
a pitched roofun tejado a dos aguas

pitched

[ˈpɪtʃt] adj (= slanting) [roof] → en pentepitched battle n
(MILITARY)bataille f rangée
(fig)bataille f rangée
Police fought a pitched battle with about 40 youths → Une bataille rangée a opposé la police à une quarantaine de jeunes.

pitched

adj
pitched roofSattel- or Giebeldach nt
battleoffen
References in classic literature ?
It was not far to Longmeadow, but the tent was pitched and the wickets down by the time they arrived.
With a groan he pitched forward and fell almost at the boy's feet.
The howling of the wind grew louder, flecks of foam began to separate themselves from the crests of the waves, and the vessel pitched, rolled and tossed more violently.
But I got a dreaming and sprawling about one night, and somehow, Sam got pitched on the floor, and came near breaking his arm.
This puts me in mind of fastening to an elephant in a tilbury on a plain --makes the wheel-spokes fly, boys, when you fasten to him that way; and there's danger of being pitched out too, when you strike a hill.
said he, tossing his little head, "I have only been giving those young people a lesson; they did not know when they had had enough, nor when I had had enough, so I just pitched them off backward; that was the only thing they could understand.
Yet ten years before, when there were no unions in Packingtown, there was a strike, and national troops had to be called, and there were pitched battles fought at night, by the light of blazing freight trains.
The huge green fragment of ice on which she alighted pitched and creaked as her weight came on it, but she staid there not a moment.
It was a tall white pine, on the top of a hill; and though I got well pitched, I was well paid for it, for I discovered new mountains in the horizon which I had never seen before--so much more of the earth and the heavens.
My knapsack brought my head down first, and I pitched into some rocks about a dozen feet below; they caught something, and tumbled me off the edge, head over heels, into the gully; the baton was dashed from my hands, and I whirled downward in a series of bounds, each longer than the last; now over ice, now into rocks, striking my head four or five times, each time with increased force.