pitched battle

(redirected from pitched battles)
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pitched battle

(pĭcht)
n.
1. An intense battle fought in close contact by troops arranged in a predetermined formation.
2. A fiercely waged battle or struggle between opposing forces.

pitched battle

n
1. (Military) a battle ensuing from the deliberate choice of time and place, engaging all the planned resources
2. any fierce encounter, esp one with large numbers

pitched′ bat′tle


n.
an intense battle at close quarters.
[1600–10]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pitched battle - a fierce battle fought in close combat between troops in predetermined positions at a chosen time and place
battle, engagement, fight, conflict - a hostile meeting of opposing military forces in the course of a war; "Grant won a decisive victory in the battle of Chickamauga"; "he lost his romantic ideas about war when he got into a real engagement"
Translations
pravidelná bitva
szabályos ütközet
uppstillt orrusta
pravidelná bitka
meydan savaşımuharebesi

pitched battle

[ˌpɪtʃtˈbætl] n (Mil) (also) (fig) → battaglia campale

pitch1

(pitʃ) verb
1. to set up (a tent or camp). They pitched their tent in the field.
2. to throw. He pitched the stone into the river.
3. to (cause to) fall heavily. He pitched forward.
4. (of a ship) to rise and fall violently. The boat pitched up and down on the rough sea.
5. to set (a note or tune) at a particular level. He pitched the tune too high for my voice.
noun
1. the field or ground for certain games. a cricket-pitch; a football pitch.
2. the degree of highness or lowness of a musical note, voice etc.
3. an extreme point or intensity. His anger reached such a pitch that he hit her.
4. the part of a street etc where a street-seller or entertainer works. He has a pitch on the High Street.
5. the act of pitching or throwing or the distance something is pitched. That was a long pitch.
6. (of a ship) the act of pitching.
-pitched
of a (certain) musical pitch. a high-pitched / low-pitched voice.
ˈpitcher noun
a person who pitches especially (in baseball) the player who throws the ball.
pitched battle
a battle between armies that have been prepared and arranged for fighting beforehand. They fought a pitched battle.
ˈpitchfork noun
a large long-handled fork for lifting and moving hay.
References in classic literature ?
Lamai fought pitched battles with his brothers and sisters for teasing Jerry, and these battles invariably culminated in Lenerengo taking a hand and impartially punishing all her progeny.
Duels, skirmishes, pitched battles, and general engagements were to be seen on every side.
They have occasionally pitched battles, fought on appointed days, and at specific places, which are generally the banks of a rivulet.
Therefore I shall fight no pitched battles, my dear Planchet," said the Gascon, laughing.
I made four aristocratic connections, and had four pitched battles with them: three thrashed me, and one I thrashed.
Pitched battles had been fought with the small armies of armed strike-breakers* put in the field by the employers' associations; the Black Hundreds, appearing in scores of wide-scattered places, had destroyed property; and, in consequence, a hundred thousand regular soldiers of the United States has been called out to put a frightful end to the whole affair.
Detesting war, the Utopians make a practice of hiring certain barbarians who, conveniently, are their neighbors, to do whatever fighting is necessary for their defense, and they win if possible, not by the revolting slaughter of pitched battles, but by the assassination of their enemies' generals.
Well, then, madame, yes, I did feel fear; and though I have been through twelve pitched battles and I cannot count how many charges and skirmishes, I own for the third time in my life I was afraid.
Yet ten years before, when there were no unions in Packingtown, there was a strike, and national troops had to be called, and there were pitched battles fought at night, by the light of blazing freight trains.
In nineteen pitched battles was I; in six- and-forty skirmishes of horse; and in small affairs without number.
Six times the Italian Government tried to dislodge him, and was defeated in six pitched battles as if by Napoleon.
The two factions drew out their forces for a pitched battle.