pitching


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pitch 1

 (pĭch)
n.
1. Any of various thick, dark, sticky substances obtained from the distillation residue of coal tar, wood tar, or petroleum and used for waterproofing, roofing, caulking, and paving.
2. Any of various natural bitumens, such as mineral pitch or asphalt.
3. A resin derived from the sap of various coniferous trees, as the pines.
tr.v. pitched, pitch·ing, pitch·es
To smear or cover with pitch.

[Middle English pich, from Old English pic and from Anglo-Norman piche, both from Latin pix, pic-.]

pitch 2

 (pĭch)
v. pitched, pitch·ing, pitch·es
v.tr.
1.
a. To throw, usually with careful aim. See Synonyms at throw.
b. To discard by throwing: pitched my worn-out sneakers.
2. Baseball
a. To throw (the ball) from the mound to the batter.
b. To play (a game or part of a game) as pitcher.
c. To assign as pitcher: The manager decided to pitch a left-hander.
3. To erect or establish; set up: pitched a tent; pitch camp.
4. To set firmly; implant; embed: pitched stakes in the ground.
5. To set at a specified downward slant: pitched the roof at a steep angle.
6.
a. To set at a particular level, degree, or quality: pitched her expectations too high.
b. Music To set the pitch or key of.
c. To adapt so as to be applicable; direct: pitched his speech to the teenagers in the audience.
7. Informal To attempt to promote or sell, often in a high-pressure manner: "showed up on local TV to pitch their views" (Business Week).
8. Sports To hit (a golf ball) in a high arc with backspin so that it does not roll very far after striking the ground.
9. Games
a. To lead (a card), thus establishing the trump suit.
b. To discard (a card other than a trump and different in suit from the card led).
v.intr.
1. To throw or toss something, such as a ball, horseshoe, or bale.
2. Baseball To play in the position of pitcher.
3. To plunge headlong: He pitched over the railing.
4.
a. To stumble around; lurch.
b. To buck, as a horse.
5.
a. Nautical To dip bow and stern alternately.
b. To oscillate about a lateral axis so that the nose lifts or descends in relation to the tail. Used of an aircraft.
c. To oscillate about a lateral axis that is both perpendicular to the longitudinal axis and horizontal to the earth. Used of a missile or spacecraft.
6. To slope downward: The hill pitches steeply.
7. To set up living quarters; encamp; settle.
8. Sports To hit a golf ball in a high arc with backspin so that it does not roll very far after striking the ground.
n.
1. The act or an instance of pitching.
2. Baseball
a. A throw of the ball by the pitcher to the batter.
b. A ball so thrown: hit the pitch into left field.
3. Sports A playing field. Also called wicket.
4.
a. Nautical The alternate dip and rise of a vessel's bow and stern.
b. The alternate lift and descent of the nose and tail of an airplane.
5.
a. A steep slope.
b. The degree of such a slope.
c. Sports A single interval between ledges or anchors used as belaying points in mountaineering: a climb of six pitches.
6. Architecture
a. The angle of a roof.
b. The highest point of a structure: the pitch of an arch.
7. A level or degree, as of intensity: worked at a feverish pitch.
8.
a. Acoustics The distinctive quality of a sound, dependent primarily on the frequency of the sound waves produced by its source.
b. Music The relative position of a tone within a range of musical sounds, as determined by this quality.
c. Music Any of various standards for this quality associating each tone with a particular frequency.
9.
a. The distance traveled by a machine screw in a single revolution.
b. The distance between two corresponding points on adjacent screw threads or gear teeth.
c. The distance between two corresponding points on a helix.
10. The distance that a propeller would travel in an ideal medium during one complete revolution, measured parallel to the shaft of the propeller.
11. Informal
a. A line of talk designed to persuade: "[his] pious pitch for ... austerity" (Boston Globe).
b. An advertisement.
12. Chiefly British The stand of a vendor or hawker.
13. Games See seven-up.
14. Printing The density of characters in a printed line, usually expressed as characters per inch.
Phrasal Verbs:
pitch in Informal
1. To set to work vigorously.
2. To join forces with others; help or cooperate.
pitch into Informal
To attack verbally or physically; assault.
pitch on/upon
Informal To succeed in choosing or achieving, usually quickly: pitched on the ideal solution.

[Middle English pichen, probably from Old English *piccean, causative of *pīcian, to prick.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pitching - (baseball) playing the position of pitcher on a baseball teampitching - (baseball) playing the position of pitcher on a baseball team
playing - the action of taking part in a game or sport or other recreation
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
2.pitching - abrupt up-and-down motion (as caused by a ship or other conveyance); "the pitching and tossing was quite exciting"
movement, motility, motion, move - a change of position that does not entail a change of location; "the reflex motion of his eyebrows revealed his surprise"; "movement is a sign of life"; "an impatient move of his hand"; "gastrointestinal motility"
careen, sway, tilt, rock - pitching dangerously to one side
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Translations

pitching

n (Mus inf: by DJ) → Pitchen nt
References in classic literature ?
Her monstrosities in the way of cattle would have taken prizes at an agricultural fair, and the perilous pitching of her vessels would have produced seasickness in the most nautical observer, if the utter disregard to all known rules of shipbuilding and rigging had not convulsed him with laughter at the first glance.
In the dim light the fig- ures of the men standing upon the express truck and pitching the boxes in at the doors of the cars were but dimly discernible.
In my native town of Salem, at the head of what, half a century ago, in the days of old King Derby, was a bustling wharf -- but which is now burdened with decayed wooden warehouses, and exhibits few or no symptoms of commercial life; except, perhaps, a bark or brig, half-way down its melancholy length, discharging hides; or, nearer at hand, a Nova Scotia schooner, pitching out her cargo of firewood -- at the head, I say, of this dilapidated wharf, which the tide often overflows, and along which, at the base and in the rear of the row of buildings, the track of many languid years is seen in a border of unthrifty grass -- here, with a view from its front windows adown this not very enlivening prospect, and thence across the harbour, stands a spacious edifice of brick.
At this moment Derick was in the act of pitching his lamp-feeder at the advancing boats, and also his oil-can; perhaps with the double view of retarding his rivals' way, and at the same time economically accelerating his own by the momentary impetus of the backward toss.
Here, Bruno," he called, whistling to the lumbering Newfoundland, who came pitching tumultuously toward them.
I even walk, on two or three occasions, in a sickly, spoony manner, round and round the house after the family are gone to bed, wondering which is the eldest Miss Larkins's chamber (and pitching, I dare say now, on Mr.
Without having any definite idea of the penalties I had incurred, it was clear to me that village boys could not go stalking about the country, ravaging the houses of gentlefolks and pitching into the studious youth of England, without laying themselves open to severe punishment.
Absorbed in the effort to maintain his equilibrium, he leaned, now forward, now back, in close imitation of the pitching of a carriage when violently jolted.
And all the time, as we were pitching it in red hot, we were keeping the women off him as best we could for they were as wild as harpies.
Soon, I felt by certain movements of pitching and tossing that the Nautilus was leaving the depths and returning to the surface.
He made his four hearty meals every day, regardless of the most persistent rolling and pitching on the part of the steamer; and he played whist indefatigably, for he had found partners as enthusiastic in the game as himself.
We could not stand up to look about us, because of the pitching of the boat.