piteously


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pit·e·ous

 (pĭt′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Demanding or arousing pity: a piteous appeal for help. See Synonyms at pathetic.
2. Archaic Pitying; compassionate.

[Middle English, from Old French piteus, from Late Latin pietōsus, merciful, from Latin pietās, compassion; see piety.]

pit′e·ous·ly adv.
pit′e·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.piteously - in a piteous manner
Translations
بِعَطْفٍ وَشَفَقَه
soucitně
hjerteskærende
af vorkunnsemi
acıklı/acınacak bir şekilde

piteously

[ˈpɪtɪəslɪ] ADVlastimeramente

piteously

advmitleiderregend; cry etc alsokläglich

piteously

[ˈpɪtɪəslɪ] advpietosamente

pity

(ˈpiti) noun
1. a feeling of sorrow for the troubles and sufferings of others. He felt a great pity for her.
2. a cause of sorrow or regret. What a pity (that) she can't come.
verb
to feel pity for (someone). She pitied him; She is to be pitied.
piteous (ˈpitiəs) adjective
pitiful. a piteous cry/sight.
ˈpiteously adverb
ˈpiteousness noun
ˈpitiable adjective
pitiful. He was in a pitiable condition; He made a pitiable attempt.
ˈpitiably adverb
ˈpitiful adjective
1. very sad; causing pity. a pitiful sight.
2. very poor, bad etc; causing contempt. a pitiful attempt; a pitiful amount of money.
ˈpitifully adverb
ˈpitifulness noun
ˈpitiless adjective
without pity. pitiless cruelty.
ˈpitilessly adverb
ˈpitilessness noun
ˈpityingly adverb
in a way which shows that one feels pity for someone. He looked at her pityingly.
have pity on
to feel pity for (someone because of something). Have pity on the old man.
take pity on
to act kindly, or relent, towards (someone), from a feeling of pity. He took pity on the hungry children and gave them food.
References in classic literature ?
It was hard to tell what was happening in the rear; the people who were falling behind shrieked as piteously as those who were already lost.
The child checked herself, looked piteously at them, and said, sorrowfully,
He snatched the child from her, and then made the men-slaves who were chained before and behind her throw her on the ground and hold her there and expose her body; and then he laid on with his lash like a madman till her back was flayed, she shriek- ing and struggling the while piteously.
It was a quarter well stocked with deformed, leering, unkempt and uncombed idiots, who held out hands or caps and begged piteously.
Presently the old judge came out of his faint and looked up piteously into the sympathetic face that was bent over him.
During all my first sleep, I was following the windings of an unknown road; total obscurity environed me; rain pelted me; I was burdened with the charge of a little child: a very small creature, too young and feeble to walk, and which shivered in my cold arms, and wailed piteously in my ear.
He stood first on one leg and then on the other; rolling and unrolling his part, and looking piteously in the faces of the friends about him.
He had been quite familiar with one old ghost, in a white waistcoat, with a monstrous iron safe attached to its ankle, who cried piteously at being unable to assist a wretched woman with an infant, whom it saw below, upon a door-step.
At this they howled piteously, as though in grief, but I called to them that I would come again and be their king, and it seemed as though their brute hearts understood my words.
In the present instance, the apprehension of impending evil was inspired by no less respectable a prophet than a large lean black dog, which, sitting upright, howled most piteously as the foremost riders left the gate, and presently afterwards, barking wildly, and jumping to and fro, seemed bent upon attaching itself to the party.
Then she paused; considered; looked bewildered; and at last appealed piteously to Agatha.
I bound her, but just as I was about to kill her she began to low most piteously, and I saw that her eyes were streaming with tears.