pitfall


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pit·fall

 (pĭt′fôl′)
n.
1. An unapparent source of trouble or danger; a hidden hazard: "potential pitfalls stemming from their optimistic inflation assumptions" (New York Times).
2. A concealed hole in the ground that serves as a trap.

pitfall

(ˈpɪtˌfɔːl)
n
1. an unsuspected difficulty or danger
2. (Hunting) a trap in the form of a concealed pit, designed to catch men or wild animals
[Old English pytt pit1 + fealle trap]

pit•fall

(ˈpɪtˌfɔl)

n.
1. a lightly covered and unnoticeable pit prepared as a trap for people or animals.
2. any trap or danger for the unwary.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pitfall - an unforeseen or unexpected or surprising difficulty
difficulty - a factor causing trouble in achieving a positive result or tending to produce a negative result; "serious difficulties were encountered in obtaining a pure reagent"
2.pitfall - a trap in the form of a concealed hole
trap - a device in which something (usually an animal) can be caught and penned

pitfall

noun (usually plural) danger, difficulty, peril, catch, trap, hazard, drawback, snag, uphill (S. African), banana skin (informal) The pitfalls of working abroad are numerous.

pitfall

noun
A source of danger or difficulty not easily foreseen and avoided:
Translations
مَزْلَق، خَطَر كامِن
léčka
faldgrubefælde
csapdakelepceverem
gryfja, dulinn hætta
beklenmedik tehliketuzak

pitfall

[ˈpɪtfɔːl] N (fig) (= danger) → peligro m; (= problem) → dificultad f, escollo m
there are many pitfalls aheadhay muchos peligros por delante
it's a pitfall for the unwaryes una trampa para los imprudentes
how to avoid the pitfalls involved in buying a housecómo evitar las dificultades or los escollos que conlleva la compra de una casa
"Pitfalls of English""Escollos mpl del Inglés"

pitfall

[ˈpɪtfɔːl] n (= unsuspected difficulty or danger) → piège m, chausse-trape f

pitfall

n (fig)Falle f, → Fallstrick m; “Pitfalls of English”„Hauptschwierigkeiten der englischen Sprache

pitfall

[ˈpɪtˌfɔːl] n (fig) → tranello, trappola

pit1

(pit) noun
1. a large hole in the ground. The campers dug a pit for their rubbish.
2. a place from which minerals are dug, especially a coal-mine. a chalk-pit; He works at/down the pit.
3. a place beside a motor race track for repairing and refuelling racing cars. The leading car has gone into the pit(s).
verbpast tense, past participle ˈpitted
(with against) to set (a person or thing) against another in a fight, competition etc. He was pitted against a much stronger man.
ˈpitfall noun
a possible danger. She has managed to avoid most of the pitfalls of life.
References in classic literature ?
By then making a loop of about a couple of miles into the open country at the back of Pumblechook's premises, I got round into the High-street again, a little beyond that pitfall, and felt myself in comparative security.
Of course there were plenty who envied him his large custom, and many was the pitfall set for me, so that he never dared to let me out of his sight.
For the first time in his life, Kim thrilled to the clean pride (it can be a deadly pitfall, none the less) of Departmental praise - ensnaring praise from an equal of work appreciated by fellow- workers.
So it came about that the First of the Tigers taught the Hairless One to kill--and ye know what harm that has since done to all our peoples--through the noose, and the pitfall, and the hidden trap, and the flying stick and the stinging fly that comes out of white smoke [Hathi meant the rifle], and the Red Flower that drives us into the open.
His true objective was the provision of a full, accurate, legible script for our noble but ill-dressed language; but he was led past that by his contempt for the popular Pitman system of Shorthand, which he called the Pitfall system.
Besides this, a great pitfall for Sergius lay in the fact of his extreme antipathy to his new Abbot, a cunning worldly man who was making a career for himself in the Church.
Not even the Welsh Giant, who, according to the popular expression, was so 'slow' as to perform a fatal surgical operation upon himself, in emulation of a juggling-trick achieved by his arch- enemy at breakfast-time; not even he fell half so readily into the snare prepared for him, as the old lady did into this artful pitfall.
We both fell into the same snare; oh dear, what a pitfall it was; it almost ruined me
5] I was interested by finding here the hollow conical pitfall of the lion-ant, or some other insect; first a fly fell down the treacherous slope and immediately disappeared; then came a large but unwary ant; its struggles to escape being very violent, those curious little jets of sand, described by Kirby and Spence
When the Christian hero of a hundred charitable victories plunges into a pitfall that has been dug for him by mistake, oh, what a warning it is to the rest of us to be unceasingly on our guard
Before one can cry she IS wrong, she seems to have started forward, and to be a creature actually running of its own accord, with broken knees and failing legs, through every variety of hole and pitfall, and stumbling constantly.
With a kind of religious fervor he had managed to go through the pitfalls of his youth and to remain virginal until after his marriage.