pitier

pitier

(ˈpɪtɪə)
n
someone who pities others or another person

pit•i•er

(ˈpɪt i ər)

n.
a person who pities.
[1595–1605]
References in periodicals archive ?
Pilfer & CIA, Benedito Pitier Filho, 55-35-3714-4778, pifferfilho@poeos-net.
If the President is convinced that a statute violates equal protection, then the DOJ can push for recognition of rights and equality, as it did in its lower-court litigation in Pitier v.
23 (criticizing readability formulas when used by persons without expertise in reading and language); Emily Pitier & Ani Nenkova, Revisiting Readability: A Unified Framework for Predicting Text Quality, http://www.
22 October 2008: Kevin James Gladen Boehm, John Casimir Burzynski, Brian Emerson Cox, Matthew Mead Dellinger, Zachary Ara Elmassian, Jennifer Rebecca Ewing, Natalie Elizabeth Gross, Jessica Morgan Hall, Allison Finley Hardy, Brian Thomas Lynch, Melissa Stewart Mills, Christine Marie Misterka, Jonathan Stas Nogay, Samantha Elizabeth Pitier, Margaret Brundage Porter, Derek Robert Schatzlein, Adam William Halonen Seeley, Krista Ann Slavicek.
Supreme Court recognized this right in the famous case of Pitier v.
29) The prospect that the Court's increasingly embattled liberals could use PITier v.
Supreme Court, in Pitier v Doe (1982), ruled that public education (K-12) must be provided to all children.
43) In some contexts, the word 'pity' implies that the pitier is in some way better off than the person who is pitied.
Interestingly, Professor Pitier, author of one of the leading articles on the poisonous tree doctrine, describes Wong Sun both ways.
One result, a distancing pity, is an appealing safety maneuver, keeping us, if not coldly analytical in Brechtian Verfremdungseffekt, at least apart, as other, as the pitier who feels the difference between ourselves and these women.
On the other hand, recent studies such as that of Pitiers and collaborators (24), on type 2 diabetic patients with average glucose levels of 14.
Responding to the idea that an adult who enjoys fairy tales is to be "scorned and pitied for arrested development," Lewis argues that it is the scorners and pitiers who are arrested: