pits


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pit 1

 (pĭt)
n.
1. A natural or artificial hole or cavity in the ground.
2.
a. An excavation for the removal of mineral deposits; a mine.
b. The shaft of a mine.
3. A concealed hole in the ground used as a trap; a pitfall.
4. A small indentation in a surface: pits in a windshield.
5.
a. A natural hollow or depression in the body or an organ.
b. A small indented scar left in the skin by smallpox or other eruptive disease; a pockmark.
c. Zoology Either of a pair of depressions between the nostril and the eye of a pit viper that contain heat-sensing organs.
d. Botany A cavity in the wall of a plant cell where there is no secondary wall, as in fibers, tracheids, and vessel elements.
e. Informal An armpit.
6. An enclosed, usually sunken area in which animals, such as dogs or gamecocks, are placed for fighting.
7.
a. The section directly in front of and below the stage of a theater, in which the musicians sit.
b. Chiefly British The ground floor of a theater behind the stalls.
8.
a. The section of an exchange where trading in a specific commodity is carried on.
b. The gambling area of a casino.
9.
a. A sunken area in a garage floor from which mechanics may work on cars.
b. often pits Sports An area beside an auto racecourse where cars may be refueled or serviced during a race: pulled into the pits to have the tires rotated.
10.
a. Hell. Used with the.
b. A miserable or depressing place or situation.
c. pits Slang The worst. Used with the: "New York politics are the pits" (Washington Star).
11. Football The middle areas of the defensive and offensive lines.
v. pit·ted, pit·ting, pits
v.tr.
1. To mark with cavities, depressions, or scars: a surface pitted with craters.
2. To set in direct opposition or competition: a war that pitted brother against brother.
3. To place, bury, or store in a pit.
v.intr.
1. To become marked with pits.
2. To retain an impression after being indented. Used of the skin.
3. To stop at a refueling area during an auto race.

[Middle English, from Old English pytt, ultimately from Latin puteus, well; see pau- in Indo-European roots.]

pit 2

 (pĭt)
n.
The single central kernel or stone of certain fruits, such as a peach or cherry.
tr.v. pit·ted, pit·ting, pits
To extract the pit from (a fruit).

[Dutch, from Middle Dutch.]

pits

(pɪts)
pl n
the pits slang the worst possible person, place, or thing
[C20: perhaps shortened from armpits]

pits

Special areas along racing tracks for refueling and servicing the cars.
References in classic literature ?
Find it he did, soon after dawn, and not far from the sand pits.
I was naturally startled, and lost no time in going out and across the Ottershaw bridge to the sand pits.
Quick, guardsmen, to the pits with the black maniac who wishes to throw his life away for a poor joke upon your ruler
Mounds where the grass was rank and high, and where brambles, dock-weed, and such-like vegetation, were confusedly heaped together, they always avoided; for dismal stories were told in that country of the old pits hidden beneath such indications.
Into the silence and darkness of the pits you will enter upon your reflection this night with the knowledge that should you fail within a reasonable time to agree to the alternative which has been offered you, never shall you emerge from the darkness and the silence again.
Into this he bore the girl and down a long, narrow corridor and winding runways that led to lower levels until they came to the pits of the palace of O-Tar.
Often they ceased their labors to squat, resting and gossiping, with much laughter, at the edge of the pit they were digging.
He also felt along the sides of the pit with his hands to see if it were possible to get out of it without help, but he found they were quite smooth and afforded no hold anywhere, at which he was greatly distressed, especially when he heard how pathetically and dolefully Dapple was bemoaning himself, and no wonder he complained, nor was it from ill-temper, for in truth he was not in a very good case.
Beyond that post a fresh pit had been dug in the ground, and near the post and the pit a large crowd stood in a semicircle.
And so he did not see or scent what a more wary Numa might readily have discovered until, with the cracking of twigs and a tumbling of earth, he was precipitated into a cunningly devised pit that the wily Wamabos had excavated for just this purpose in the center of the game trail.
This is a ruined Khan of the Middle Ages, in one of whose side courts is a great walled and arched pit with water in it, and this pit, one tradition says, is the one Joseph's brethren cast him into.
The last notes of the introduction to the opera were being played, and the seats in the pit were all filled, when Pesca and I reached the theatre.